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Common Law Marriage

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Actor William Hurt's former lover, Sandra Jennings, yesterday lost a bid to take a $5 million bite out of Hurt's $10 million assets when a Manhattan judge ruled that no common-law marriage ever existed between them. Meanwhile, Jennings' lawyer, Richard Golub, accused state Supreme Court Justice Jacqueline Silbermann of being "star struck and in love" with the blond, Oscar-winning defendant. "Let five judges who are men decide this," quipped Golub, who plans to appeal. Jennings, a former ballerina who bore Hurt a son during their three-year relationship, had sought to cash in on a legal argument that the couple had a common-law marriage in South Carolina, where they cohabited briefly while Hurt was filming "The Big Chill.
NEWS
November 25, 2003 | By Kathy Boccella and Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
It was a traditional wedding in nearly every way, but one seemingly essential element was missing: someone to perform the ceremony. That's how Peter Schneider and Susan DeJarnatt wanted it when they got hitched in their Mount Airy backyard before dozens of guests on May 28, 1995. Instead of having a minister or judge perform the wedding, the couple married themselves. As Benjamin Franklin and his mate did centuries ago, "we declared ourselves to be married," Schneider, 48, said of the blink-and-you'll-miss-it ceremony, which ended when the groom stomped on a glass.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | By Kevin McKinney, Special to The Inquirer
Jean L. Walker lived with Rufus Heck for more than 30 years. She raised their two children with him. And she stood by his bedside daily for three years before he succumbed to illness in 1987 at 73. Now, Walker, 61, of Oxford, Chester County, has sued Heck's former employer, Lukens Steel Co. in Coatesville, seeking Heck's pension fund death benefits. Lukens contends Walker is not entitled to them because the two were never married. In the lawsuit filed Tuesday in Common Pleas Court in Chester County, Walker maintained that she and Heck were bound by a common-law marriage.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | New York Daily News
William Hurt's first wife, actress Mary Beth Hurt, testified yesterday that she urged her then-husband to marry his pregnant lover in 1982, but he declared he was "finished with marriage. " The actress testified for Hurt at the close of the palimony suit brought against the Oscar-winning actor by former ballerina Sandra Jennings, his ex- lover and mother of his son Alexander, 6. Mary Beth Hurt, wearing a slouchy gray sweatshirt and skirt and a cropped blonde hairstyle, said she and Hurt had been separated several years when he told her he wanted a divorce during a September 1982 meeting.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | New York Daily News
Actor William Hurt ordered an employee to shred his financial records "quietly" and have his home checked for electronic bugs after he learned he was being sued by ex-lover Sandra Jennings, the employee testified yesterday. Hurt's mouth dropped open and he ran his fingers through his thinning blond hair as his former assistant, Diana Schiebel, told a Manhattan court: "He said that I had to take all the financial records and quietly destroy them. " Hurt later called his first witness, a South Carolina law professor who said that in his opinion no common-law marriage exists between Hurt, 39, and Jennings, 32, as the former ballerina claims in her "divorce" suit seeking half of up to $10 million from Hurt.
NEWS
March 13, 2013
Welsh-born Princess Lilian of Sweden, 97, whose decades-long love story with the king's uncle was one of the better-kept secrets of the royal household, died Sunday. A brief statement on the Royal Palace's website said Princess Lilian died at her home in Stockholm. It didn't give a cause of death, but she had Alzheimer's disease and had been in poor health for several years. Lilian Craig met Prince Bertil in 1943, but the prince's obligations to the throne and Lilian's status as a divorced commoner prevented them from making their love public, and it would take more than 30 years before they could marry.
NEWS
May 4, 1998 | BY MARK A. ARONCHICK
What do Ben & Jerry's, Lotus Corp., IBM, U.S. West, the city of Chicago and Burlington, Vt., have in common? All have found ways to provide domestic-partner benefits to gay and lesbian employees. In Pennsylvania, a multitude of legal rights and obligations are triggered by marital status. Rights to pensions, bereavement leave and employer health-care programs are typically governed by whether the individuals involved are married. Under Pennsylvania law, heterosexual couples can enter into a marriage through civil or religious ceremonies or they can create a common-law marriage merely by agreeing in private or in public to be married.
NEWS
June 17, 1989 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, the Washington Post and United Press International
On the verge of their summer tour, which includes a July 7 stop at Philadelphia's JFK Stadium, the Grateful Dead have begun mailing letters to fans asking them to control their behavior so that "police, merchants, neighbors can be comfortable" with this traveling circus . . . or the circus won't be able to travel no mo'. " The 24-year-old band seems to be more popular than ever, and in recent years there have been increased clashes with police and...
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
Now at last, a courtroom drama starring a real Oscar-award-winning actor. Live and in color, brought to you directly from our television studio, uh, courtroom, in Manhattan: It's William Hurt v. Sandra Jennings! Roll the credits please. Sandra Jennings: A former ballet dancer, and mother of 6-year-old Alex Hurt. She claims that she was as-good-as-married to the father of their child. Five years post-split, she wants half of the $7 million he has earned since 1982. William Hurt: Father of Alex, but now husband of Heidi Henderson.
NEWS
June 14, 1989 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
Harry Britt, the ruddy and ebullient president of the Board of Supervisors, rushes into his book-lined cubbyhole of an office in City Hall and immediately defines the subject at hand. "We're talking about love here!" What we are actually talking about when we're talking about love(!) is the domestic partners bill. The ordinance Britt wrote has just been signed. It sets up a new non-married, non-single category of relations called "domestic partners. " Any couples who want to enter into the earthly state of partnership will now be allowed an official ceremony called registration.
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NEWS
March 13, 2013
Welsh-born Princess Lilian of Sweden, 97, whose decades-long love story with the king's uncle was one of the better-kept secrets of the royal household, died Sunday. A brief statement on the Royal Palace's website said Princess Lilian died at her home in Stockholm. It didn't give a cause of death, but she had Alzheimer's disease and had been in poor health for several years. Lilian Craig met Prince Bertil in 1943, but the prince's obligations to the throne and Lilian's status as a divorced commoner prevented them from making their love public, and it would take more than 30 years before they could marry.
NEWS
November 25, 2003 | By Kathy Boccella and Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
It was a traditional wedding in nearly every way, but one seemingly essential element was missing: someone to perform the ceremony. That's how Peter Schneider and Susan DeJarnatt wanted it when they got hitched in their Mount Airy backyard before dozens of guests on May 28, 1995. Instead of having a minister or judge perform the wedding, the couple married themselves. As Benjamin Franklin and his mate did centuries ago, "we declared ourselves to be married," Schneider, 48, said of the blink-and-you'll-miss-it ceremony, which ended when the groom stomped on a glass.
NEWS
May 4, 1998 | BY MARK A. ARONCHICK
What do Ben & Jerry's, Lotus Corp., IBM, U.S. West, the city of Chicago and Burlington, Vt., have in common? All have found ways to provide domestic-partner benefits to gay and lesbian employees. In Pennsylvania, a multitude of legal rights and obligations are triggered by marital status. Rights to pensions, bereavement leave and employer health-care programs are typically governed by whether the individuals involved are married. Under Pennsylvania law, heterosexual couples can enter into a marriage through civil or religious ceremonies or they can create a common-law marriage merely by agreeing in private or in public to be married.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | By Kevin McKinney, Special to The Inquirer
Jean L. Walker lived with Rufus Heck for more than 30 years. She raised their two children with him. And she stood by his bedside daily for three years before he succumbed to illness in 1987 at 73. Now, Walker, 61, of Oxford, Chester County, has sued Heck's former employer, Lukens Steel Co. in Coatesville, seeking Heck's pension fund death benefits. Lukens contends Walker is not entitled to them because the two were never married. In the lawsuit filed Tuesday in Common Pleas Court in Chester County, Walker maintained that she and Heck were bound by a common-law marriage.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Actor William Hurt's former lover, Sandra Jennings, yesterday lost a bid to take a $5 million bite out of Hurt's $10 million assets when a Manhattan judge ruled that no common-law marriage ever existed between them. Meanwhile, Jennings' lawyer, Richard Golub, accused state Supreme Court Justice Jacqueline Silbermann of being "star struck and in love" with the blond, Oscar-winning defendant. "Let five judges who are men decide this," quipped Golub, who plans to appeal. Jennings, a former ballerina who bore Hurt a son during their three-year relationship, had sought to cash in on a legal argument that the couple had a common-law marriage in South Carolina, where they cohabited briefly while Hurt was filming "The Big Chill.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
Now at last, a courtroom drama starring a real Oscar-award-winning actor. Live and in color, brought to you directly from our television studio, uh, courtroom, in Manhattan: It's William Hurt v. Sandra Jennings! Roll the credits please. Sandra Jennings: A former ballet dancer, and mother of 6-year-old Alex Hurt. She claims that she was as-good-as-married to the father of their child. Five years post-split, she wants half of the $7 million he has earned since 1982. William Hurt: Father of Alex, but now husband of Heidi Henderson.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | New York Daily News
William Hurt's first wife, actress Mary Beth Hurt, testified yesterday that she urged her then-husband to marry his pregnant lover in 1982, but he declared he was "finished with marriage. " The actress testified for Hurt at the close of the palimony suit brought against the Oscar-winning actor by former ballerina Sandra Jennings, his ex- lover and mother of his son Alexander, 6. Mary Beth Hurt, wearing a slouchy gray sweatshirt and skirt and a cropped blonde hairstyle, said she and Hurt had been separated several years when he told her he wanted a divorce during a September 1982 meeting.
NEWS
June 27, 1989 | New York Daily News
Actor William Hurt ordered an employee to shred his financial records "quietly" and have his home checked for electronic bugs after he learned he was being sued by ex-lover Sandra Jennings, the employee testified yesterday. Hurt's mouth dropped open and he ran his fingers through his thinning blond hair as his former assistant, Diana Schiebel, told a Manhattan court: "He said that I had to take all the financial records and quietly destroy them. " Hurt later called his first witness, a South Carolina law professor who said that in his opinion no common-law marriage exists between Hurt, 39, and Jennings, 32, as the former ballerina claims in her "divorce" suit seeking half of up to $10 million from Hurt.
NEWS
June 17, 1989 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, the Washington Post and United Press International
On the verge of their summer tour, which includes a July 7 stop at Philadelphia's JFK Stadium, the Grateful Dead have begun mailing letters to fans asking them to control their behavior so that "police, merchants, neighbors can be comfortable" with this traveling circus . . . or the circus won't be able to travel no mo'. " The 24-year-old band seems to be more popular than ever, and in recent years there have been increased clashes with police and...
NEWS
June 14, 1989 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
Harry Britt, the ruddy and ebullient president of the Board of Supervisors, rushes into his book-lined cubbyhole of an office in City Hall and immediately defines the subject at hand. "We're talking about love here!" What we are actually talking about when we're talking about love(!) is the domestic partners bill. The ordinance Britt wrote has just been signed. It sets up a new non-married, non-single category of relations called "domestic partners. " Any couples who want to enter into the earthly state of partnership will now be allowed an official ceremony called registration.
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