CollectionsCommon People
IN THE NEWS

Common People

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 27, 2011
TO LETTER-writer Stuart Caesar: As a Republican and fiscal conservative, I must take serious issue with you. The U.S. was founded by men and woman fighting to be free of taxation without representation. These patriots were not part of a standing army; they were common people who left behind their life to fight for something better. This would occur again in the Civil War, and World wars I and II. No war we have fought since those days has been worth the cost we paid. While I respect the people who join our nation's armies, they do so of their own free will, and are paid for it. We had no reason to deploy troops in Iraq other than misinformation about WMDs.
NEWS
June 10, 2012
When TV personality Bothaina Kamel decided to run for president in April 2011, she knew she had no chance of winning. But she wanted "to break taboos, and I believe I've achieved this. " Back then, "a woman candidate was regarded as an alien, but now the idea is accepted. Now there has been a woman candidate who went through the process. " Moreover, when Kamel traveled to remote villages to collect signatures for her candidacy, she found that common people accepted a female contender.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1996 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ladies and gentlemen, the new British Invasion has finally found its showman, and his name is Jarvis Cocker. Pulp, the Sheffield, England, band led by the 6-foot-4 stickman with the foppish 'do, completed its first U.S. tour on Sunday with a sold-out show at the Theater of Living Arts. For 90 minutes, Cocker was everything his immobile countrymen in Oasis - the band Pulp deserves to follow to a mass-audience breakthrough - aren't. As his Bowiesque croon soared on one terrific post-disco pop tune after the next, Cocker pumped his pelvis, kicked like a Rockette, and acted out the lyrics with theatrical flair.
NEWS
March 5, 2009
IN APRIL 2005, my sister and a number of patrons a bar she owns were robbed at gunpoint by two masked men. The perpetrators were pursued and apprehended by Philadelphia police. Masks, weapons and the contents of the cash drawer (nearly $600) were recovered. All items were taken by the city to be held as evidence. After close to four years of delayed hearings, the trial finally resulted, God only know how, in a hung jury. My sister, who'd been requesting her money since mid-2005, was calling the D.A.'s office without success.
NEWS
August 18, 1991
THOUGHTS ON PATRIOTISM Patriotism in its most common usage is best defined as the last refuge of scoundrels, who label every infamy and abomination as patriotism. Let me list some of the things these above-mentioned scoundrels define as patriotism: Fighting wars of aggression thousands of miles away. Fighting wars of colonial oppression. Poisioning the atmosphere with auto emissions and pollution and acid rain. Ruthlessly destroying forest. Promoting racism as a means of winning elections.
NEWS
March 13, 1993 | By ROGER E. HERNANDEZ
A political brawl in Georgia is a reminder of the great paradox that is at the very soul of this country. Earlier this week Gov. Zell Miller said he would end his fight to remove the Confederate battle emblem from the state flag. Miller told reporters he did not think he could win. Amazing. How is it possible that in 1993 there are still people who want a symbol of slavery to represent their state? Don't they care that it is offensive to people whose ancestors were slaves?
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Margaret Mary Flanigan Long, 72, a tireless worker for the Camden County Democratic Party who also served as director of payroll and assistant director of personnel for the Camden County CETA program from 1976 until retiring in 1983, died Tuesday at home of cancer. A Lindenwold resident since 1990, Mrs. Long was born in Philadelphia and had resided in Camden County, first in East Camden and then in Bellmawr, since she was 5. Her interest in politics began in 1968 when Thomas S. Higgins, later her son-in-law, made a losing bid to unseat then-Rep.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | By GEORGE F. WILL
The two most important months in Washington's history were June 1790 and June 1987. In June 1790, Jefferson and Hamilton met in Manhattan and agreed: Jefferson would support Hamilton's plan for national assumption of states' debts, Hamilton would support Jefferson's plan for moving the capital south from New York. In June 1987, Bea Kristol moved here from New York with her husband Irving. He is a one-man critical mass, whose move symbolized the movement of the nation's center of intellectual gravity from New York and to the right.
NEWS
January 27, 2011
AMONG the many lessons from the Kermit Gosnell debacle is that the medical profession needs to do a better job of policing itself. That includes taking action when repeated litigation against one physician suggests that he's become a problem. Such was the case with Gosnell. I joined legendary trial lawyer James E. Beasley in the practice of law in 1993. One of the first medical-malpractice files he assigned me had been filed by the firm in November 1992 against a West Philadelphia physician who was not yet a household name.
NEWS
April 23, 2007 | By RANDY LoBASSO
IT HAPPENED so fast. Less than 24 hours after the terrible massacre at Virginia Tech, with 33 dead, including the shooter, Ken Ham, who leads an outfit called Answers in Genesis, had this to say: "We live in an era when public schools and colleges have all but banned God from science classes . . . The more such a philosophy permeates the culture, the more we would expect to see a sense of purposelessness and hopelessness that pervades people's...
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 24, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THROUGHOUT THE DAY, hundreds of pilgrims from the World Meeting of Families made their way to the Knotted Grotto, beside the Cathedral Basilica of Ss. Peter and Paul, to write their prayers on strips of cloth and add them to the 40,000 already tied there, stirring gently in the breeze. Each pilgrim wrote a personal plea, tied it to a fence, then untied someone else's prayer, carried it inside the grotto, tied it to the wood frame and prayed for a complete stranger, bound together only by a mutual Catholic faith.
NEWS
June 30, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Several dozen protesters affiliated with the Occupy movement convened from cities nationwide on Independence Mall Saturday, setting off tensions with park rangers on the first morning of a planned five-day national Occupy gathering. Rangers disgruntled occupiers by telling them that they could not bring their tents, even unassembled ones, onto the lawn owned by the National Park Service. Told that they could not set up a card table to distribute literature on the Market Street sidewalk without a permit, protesters held out a "people's permit" that they had drafted.
NEWS
June 10, 2012
When TV personality Bothaina Kamel decided to run for president in April 2011, she knew she had no chance of winning. But she wanted "to break taboos, and I believe I've achieved this. " Back then, "a woman candidate was regarded as an alien, but now the idea is accepted. Now there has been a woman candidate who went through the process. " Moreover, when Kamel traveled to remote villages to collect signatures for her candidacy, she found that common people accepted a female contender.
NEWS
April 27, 2011
TO LETTER-writer Stuart Caesar: As a Republican and fiscal conservative, I must take serious issue with you. The U.S. was founded by men and woman fighting to be free of taxation without representation. These patriots were not part of a standing army; they were common people who left behind their life to fight for something better. This would occur again in the Civil War, and World wars I and II. No war we have fought since those days has been worth the cost we paid. While I respect the people who join our nation's armies, they do so of their own free will, and are paid for it. We had no reason to deploy troops in Iraq other than misinformation about WMDs.
NEWS
January 27, 2011
AMONG the many lessons from the Kermit Gosnell debacle is that the medical profession needs to do a better job of policing itself. That includes taking action when repeated litigation against one physician suggests that he's become a problem. Such was the case with Gosnell. I joined legendary trial lawyer James E. Beasley in the practice of law in 1993. One of the first medical-malpractice files he assigned me had been filed by the firm in November 1992 against a West Philadelphia physician who was not yet a household name.
NEWS
March 5, 2009
IN APRIL 2005, my sister and a number of patrons a bar she owns were robbed at gunpoint by two masked men. The perpetrators were pursued and apprehended by Philadelphia police. Masks, weapons and the contents of the cash drawer (nearly $600) were recovered. All items were taken by the city to be held as evidence. After close to four years of delayed hearings, the trial finally resulted, God only know how, in a hung jury. My sister, who'd been requesting her money since mid-2005, was calling the D.A.'s office without success.
NEWS
June 2, 2008 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the waning hours before tomorrow's primary election, Democratic Senate candidates Rep. Rob Andrews and incumbent Sen. Frank Lautenberg stayed close to home yesterday, working to turn out their core supporters. Lautenberg focused on church services and ethnic festivals in North Jersey, while Andrews campaigned in his base of South Jersey, visiting diners, supermarkets and community events. At the Crystal Lake Diner in Westmont yesterday, Andrews worked the lunchtime crowd, shaking hands and chatting.
NEWS
April 23, 2007 | By RANDY LoBASSO
IT HAPPENED so fast. Less than 24 hours after the terrible massacre at Virginia Tech, with 33 dead, including the shooter, Ken Ham, who leads an outfit called Answers in Genesis, had this to say: "We live in an era when public schools and colleges have all but banned God from science classes . . . The more such a philosophy permeates the culture, the more we would expect to see a sense of purposelessness and hopelessness that pervades people's...
NEWS
January 11, 2003
Underlying causes for ailing holiday sales Downplaying a holiday shopping season that some sources report as the worst showing in 30 years, Robert Tracinski waxes sentimental about the "tranquil atmosphere of the shopping malls" (Commentary, "Peace now may require war very soon," Jan. 2). He neglects to mention that the slump in holiday retail purchases was the logical consequence of yet another year of economic downturn, unchecked corporate corruption (resulting in vanishing pensions)
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brother Jude Sanelli, 73, simply "Brother Jude" to the elderly he served for more than 25 years, died of complications associated with cancer of the gall bladder Sunday at his home in South Philadelphia.Brother Jude's home also is home to about two dozen women who live at Our Mother of Good Counsel Center, an assisted-living facility that he founded. Brother Jude, an Augustinian monk, opened the facility in 1974 as a place for elderly people whose families could not or would not care for them.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|