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Common Sense

NEWS
March 17, 1995 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Like other companies grappling with the federal regulatory octopus, Custom Print owner Stu McMichael currently fills out 20 toxic-emission forms for his Virginia print shop. But under regulatory reforms announced by President Clinton yesterday, he'll be able to breeze through with only one form. With the Republican-led Congress pushing sweeping changes to curb federal regulation, Clinton announced a series of more modest steps aimed at freeing businesses from cumbersome rules.
NEWS
March 17, 1995 | By Trudy Rubin
Having just returned home from five weeks in places where wars are raging or brewing, I find that something seems to have gone missing in American politics. Common sense. I usually breathe a sigh of relief after returning home from countries where political leaders indulge in the kind of vicious polemics that encourage longtime neighbors to start killing each other. Not this time. A week back in the United States and my eyes and ears are overwhelmed by the kind of blatant demagoguery from Washington that I associate with leaders of failing states.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | By Malcolm Garcia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Opponents of the auto-inspection test implemented last year are bringing their fight to the polls. "Instead of taking and accepting candidates presented to us, we're telling our members to write in an alternative name as a protest vote," said John DiPrimio of the group Citizens for Common Sense. DiPrimio said voters could write in his name or a name of their own choosing. The campaign won't change the outcome of the election but will "draw more attention to our cause," said DiPrimio, a general contractor.
NEWS
August 29, 2005 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
With the deadline to qualify in New Jersey's first "Clean Elections" only eight days away, rules have been eased for collecting the 1,500 small contributions candidates need to participate in the public-financing pilot program. The State Election Enforcement Commission will now allow voters to make online contributions of $5 and $30 using debit or check cards at a Web site the state Treasury Department expects to have operating later this week. Assembly candidates in Camden County's Sixth District and Monmouth County's 13th District - the only two legislative districts participating in the state's Clean Elections experiment - have in previous weeks had to collect contributions solely by check or money order.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dave Mock surveyed the large crowd, his head shaking incredulously. "My biggest concern," said the president of the Rotary Club of Feasterville, "was that no one was going to come. " Call it a sign of the times. At least 200 people turned out last week to learn how they could protect themselves if they became targets of a carjacking. Scheduled to start at 7 p.m. at the Holiday Inn on Street Road, people - old and young, men and women - began filing in before 6:45 p.m., quickly filling the small room as special agents from the FBI - the scheduled guest speakers - fiddled with a television set and checked the overhead slide projector.
SPORTS
June 18, 1996 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The understanding has hit home, all over the big-business college sports landscape, that the system is broken. Even the NCAA seems to have gotten the message. The news hits that a top basketball player like Marcus Camby has taken money and jewelry from an agent and has said he would do it again, and that at the same time he has filed criminal charges against the agent for blackmail. The news hits, and nobody at the NCAA is surprised. It "reconfirms" the problems the organization has, one of its staff members said.
LIVING
October 22, 1992 | By Gary Blonston, KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE Contributing to this story were Inquirer Washington Bureau writers Kristin Huckshorn, Barbara Demick and David Everett
From the moment he put on his Boy Scout uniform, from the first time he counted his extra pay for delivering newspapers in dangerous neighborhoods in Texarkana, Texas, Ross Perot, patriot and capitalist, did not just chase the American dream - he lived the American myth. In time, he became a national emblem of hard work, entrepreneurial fire and common sense. He embraced family, country, charity, loyalty, contempt for sloth and self-indulgence, intolerance of fools and their follies.
NEWS
January 29, 2012
1. d. Thetford. 2. c. Corsets. 3. b. 1774. 4. a. Pennsylvania Magazine. 5. c. Bordentown City, N.J. 6. True, as early as 1775 in the essay "African Slavery in America. " 7. b. "Common Sense. " 8. c. "Rights of Man. " 9. d. "Dissertation on First Principles of Government. " 10. a. "The American Crisis. "
NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By WILLIAM C. KASHATUS
ON THE EVE of the American Revolution, Britain's North American colonists were divided over the issue of independence. A third favored separation from England. Another third opposed it, and yet another third was indifferent, believing that the issue didn't affect them. That changed in January 1776 with the publication of Thomas Paine's "Common Sense. " The 47-page pamphlet served as a lightning rod for American independence by mobilizing the masses for revolution. But Paine's volatile rhetoric and his controversial background prevented historians from recognizing his significant contribution as a Founding Father until two centuries later.
NEWS
April 29, 1991
A lot of candidates we've talked to lately have been promising to return "common sense" to government, if elected, which initially seemed to be a rather over-modest pledge. That, however, was before "alleygate. " One would think that the supposedly overburdened Department of Licenses and Inspections would be too busy to go to court to rid the city of a gate put up to discourage burglars from entering houses through an alley near the corner of 19th and Waverly Streets, and which was apparently doing no one any harm.
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