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NEWS
January 23, 1992 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
"We must liberate the electoral process from the tyranny of the campaign dollar. " ". . . We must close the loopholes that allow special interests to throw their money around. " ". . . We must select our judges on the basis of what they know instead of who they know. " There was lots of fife-and-drum, good-government stuff yesterday in Gov. Casey's State of the Commonwealth address. The question is, were his declarations worthy of a brass plaque, or were they merely boilerplate?
NEWS
March 21, 1992 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk angrily warned yesterday that the Commonwealth of Independent States was "doomed" unless Russia stopped trying to dominate the fledgling organization. Speaking at the end of the third summit of commonwealth leaders, Kravchuk sarcastically criticized Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and accused Russia of wanting to be the sole successor to the former Soviet Union. Throughout the day, Kravchuk and other Ukrainian officials indicated that Ukraine, with a population of about 52 million, might soon pull out of the commonwealth, a move that would seriously weaken or kill the alliance that replaced the U.S.S.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
NO ONE in court yesterday disputed that, when Philly cops stopped Khristen Jones' car on April 1, they found more than 496 grams of marijuana worth $4,940, nearly $5,600 in cash, a drug scale, a gun holster and drug-dealing paraphernalia. With all that evidence, it would seem that the District Attorney's Office would have no problem securing a conviction and prison sentence for Jones, 37, of Woodlyn, Delaware County. Instead, Assistant D.A. Geremy Johnson agreed with defense lawyer Lonny Fish to drop a felony drug-dealing charge and let Jones plead no contest to a misdemeanor possession charge.
SPORTS
August 27, 2010
Applebrook's Catherine Elliott used a tournament-best 74 to capture the Women's Golf Association of Philadelphia's 104th Stroke Play Championship on Thursday at Manufacturers Golf and Country Club. Elliott, tied for sixth place after the first day of the 36-hole competition, overtook 18-hole leaders Marji Goldman and Kerry Rutan of the Philadelphia Cricket Club to post a two-day total of 155. Elliott won by a stroke and claimed the Mary Thayer Farnum Cup. Elliott, who helped Penn win the Ivy League title this spring, also claimed the WGAP's Silver Cross, which is awarded to the player with the lowest combined scores from the Farnum Cup and the qualifying round of the Amateur Championship.
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
The Berean Institute has been evicted from its landmark building in North Philadelphia. The historic school, which was founded in 1899 to provide job training to African-Americans, has been ordered to "quit, vacate and remove all belongings" from the state-owned building at 19th Street and Girard Avenue by Friday, according to a letter dated Sept. 6, 2012 from the state Office of the General Counsel. The letter was addressed to Dr. Lorraine Poole-Naranjo, president of the Berean Institute, who said Monday afternoon that the school will move to a new location.
NEWS
December 9, 1991 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer
The leaders of the powerful Slavic republics of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus officially declared the Soviet Union dead yesterday and signed a historic agreement creating a commonwealth of their three independent states. "We, the republics of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, as the founding states of the U.S.S.R., state that the U.S.S.R. as a subject of international law and geopolitical reality ceases to exist," said the agreement signed by the presidents and prime ministers of the three republics.
NEWS
January 13, 1986
I agree 100 percent with Harold J. Weigand's column of Jan. 4, "Go easy on that center," relative to the city's plans for a convention center. The City of Philadelphia and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania should not use our tax dollars for a project of questionable necessity; and the proposed location is ludicrous. L.W. Born Jr. Philadelphia.
SPORTS
June 7, 2012
Golf Association of Phila. SENIOR FOUR-BALL STROKE PLAY At Heidelberg; par 70. Gross Division Mark Leaman, Honeybrook; Marlin Detweiler, Lancaster. . . 65 Tom Borsello, White Clay Creek; Mike Domenick, Phoenixville. . . 67 Mark Walker; Kenneth Zimmer; Laurel Creek. . . 67 Don Donatoni, White Manor; Michael Rose, Talamore. . . 67 Carl Everett, Merion; Neil McDermott, Llanerch. . . 69 Richard Lownes; James Muller, Manufacturers.
NEWS
June 4, 2000
Pennsylvania calls itself a commonwealth. But often it acts as if that title is a cynical joke - never more so than when it gets to squabbling over what it owes its schoolchildren. As you may have heard, the latest installment of "cry wolf" by the city schools has ended, as usual, not with the threatened padlocking of empty-pocketed schools. No, it ended with some typical fiscal abracadabra by state and city officials that delays the day of reckoning for another year. (The money woes are real; it's just the threats that aren't.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 17, 2016
By Jim Cawley, Maari Porter, and Pedro A. Ramos Amid last week's wintry blast, Gov. Wolf unveiled his 2016-17 budget proposal, a frigid reminder of the extraordinary circumstances in which we find ourselves as a commonwealth. With a new fiscal year just around the corner, Pennsylvania remains burdened by the inadequate 2015-16 budget signed on Dec. 29 by the governor, in which he vetoed $7 billion in spending after prolonged wrangling with the Republican-led legislature. Current funding levels are woefully insufficient for a properly functioning commonwealth and, barring further action in Harrisburg, could in fact threaten the education of our children and the well-being of many of our most at-risk populations.
NEWS
January 21, 2016
By Topher Spiro and Meghan O'Toole How can Pennsylvania address income inequality, improve the lives of mothers and children, and save money - all at the same time? This might sound too good to be true, but the commonwealth can accomplish all of these things by expanding the reach of just one type of program: nurse home visiting. Home-visiting programs connect parents with nurses, social workers, and other professionals who provide coaching and guidance on healthy child development and link families with other important services.
NEWS
August 29, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a decision that could prove far-reaching, Commonwealth Court ruled Thursday that the Philadelphia School District does not have the power to override state law and limit charter-school enrollment. The School Reform Commission moved in 2010 to cap enrollment in - and therefore payments to - some city charters that had previously agreed to limits, but it declined to do so under new charters. Those schools, Richard Allen Preparatory and Delaware Valley, were ultimately joined by Folk-Arts Cultural Treasures Charter School, Walter D. Palmer Leadership Learning Partners Charter School, and Wakisha Charter School in a suit claiming the caps were illegal.
NEWS
July 14, 2015 | By Sam Janesch, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Going on two weeks without a budget - and with no end in sight to the stalemate - Pennsylvania could become the last state in the nation to compromise on a new spending plan. As of Friday, the commonwealth was one of five states required to pass a budget by July 1 that still had not. Of them, three have agreed on temporary spending plans to keep services and payments flowing - unlike Pennsylvania, which has lost some of its spending authority. Gov. Wolf has said that his administration will do everything it can to minimize the impact of a stalemate, but that it is important to him to get a strong final product.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Truebright Science Academy Charter School says it's not ready to shut down. The board of the charter in Olney has decided to appeal Friday's Commonwealth Court decision that said the School Reform Commission had ample grounds to close the school for poor academic performance. The three-judge Commonwealth Court panel affirmed a finding by the state Charter Appeal Board, which had upheld the SRC decision. The board found that Truebright had failed to deliver the academic performance it promised in its application and had not met state standards.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
COMMONWEALTH Court yesterday dismissed a lawsuit accusing the state of failing to adequately and equitably fund Pennsylvania public schools. The complaint was filed by six school districts, seven parents, the Pennsylvania Association of Rural and Small Schools and the NAACP Pennsylvania State Conference, who said they plan to appeal to the state Supreme Court. "This is a question of paramount importance to all Pennsylvanians, and we always knew this would ultimately be decided by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court," Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia executive director Jennifer Clarke, a member of the legal team representing the plaintiffs, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commonwealth Court on Friday upheld a year-old lower-court decision that restored $125.8 million in tobacco-settlement money to Pennsylvania. The money had been stripped from the state's share of a 2003 payment under the landmark 1998 agreement by major tobacco companies to compensate states for their health-care costs related to smoking. "We are very pleased with the Commonwealth Court's decision, which ensures the terms of the [master settlement agreement] are followed by the arbitration panel and that Pennsylvania is fairly treated under the terms of the agreement," Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said in a statement.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - With much at stake, lawyers for the School Reform Commission on Wednesday asked a panel of five Commonwealth Court judges to affirm their power to cancel the Philadelphia School District teachers' contract. The law that created the SRC acknowledged that in times of distress, the commission must have at its disposal special powers, argued commission attorney Mark Aronchick. "The polestar is the children, not the protection of some collective bargaining interest that protects the interest of teachers," Aronchick told the judges.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Aaron Bacote scored a career-high 31 points to lift Old Dominion to a 73-67 win over No. 14 Virginia Commonwealth on Saturday in Norfolk, Va. Bacote, who entered the game averaging just four points and shooting 16 percent, had scored just 20 points on the season. He made his first eight shots, including four three-pointers, and was 11 for 13 from the free-throw line to top his previous career high of 28. The Rams (4-2) were paced by Treveon Graham's 34 points and never led after the opening minutes.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can the Philadelphia School Reform Commission cancel union contracts? The question now rests in the hands of Commonwealth Court. As a result of an agreement reached in the last week, a Common Pleas Court judge has permanently enjoined the Philadelphia School District from unilaterally canceling its teachers' contract. The district immediately appealed the decision. Both sides called the order a victory Tuesday: District officials said it was a fast track to Commonwealth Court in Harrisburg, the venue it prefers, widely viewed as more favorable to the SRC's viewpoint.
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