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NEWS
January 19, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Premier Marian Calfa has quit the Communist Party, reducing the number of Communists in the 21-member federal government to seven, a government spokesman said today. Calfa is the third minister in the coalition government to leave the Communist Party in the last two weeks. Zbynek Fiala, head of the government's press department, made the announcement at a news conference. First Deputy Premier Valtr Komarek, who is in charge of economic affairs, quit the party at the beginning of last week.
NEWS
January 29, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
In disarray since ceding power to Solidarity, the Communists dissolved their 41-year-old party today and broke into two new groups that will seek roles in the East bloc's first parliamentary democracy. Meeting in an ornate hall at the neo-Stalinist Palace of Culture in central Warsaw, the main body of Communists created a new social democratic party. But a breakaway reformer backed by Solidarity leader Lech Walesa, former Gdansk party chief Tadeusz Fiszbach, created another party he said he hoped would not be tainted by the remnants of the old one. Poland has led the past year's whirlwind of democratic reform in the East bloc.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Editorial Board
No political event in the East Bloc in recent memory has raised expectations as high as the special Communist Party conference that is due to begin two days from now in Moscow . During my recent four-week trip to Moscow, Tallinn, Budapest and Prague, intellectuals were fixated on that date. They talked about it with passion, a sense of urgency, and the open fear that if Gorbachev failed at the conference, the hope for reform was lost. In one way or another many echoed the much quoted words of playwright Aleksandr Gelman that "If conservative forces manage to cut short our revolutionary perestroika (restructuring)
NEWS
December 17, 1995 | By Inga Saffron, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Russians are not only voting for a new parliament today. They're voicing their views on the future direction of their country. Although 43 parties are listed on the ballot, representing more than 10,000 candidates, the contest in the last few weeks has been reduced to a choice of whether Russia keeps moving toward a Western-style free-market economy or takes a more authoritarian, anti-capitalist turn. In one camp are the pro-reform government of Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin and several market-oriented opposition parties.
NEWS
June 5, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
Solidarity claimed a smashing victory today in Poland's first democratic election since World War II. Partial unofficial returns today indicated a strong Solidarity victory in the new Senate and the possible rejection of top communist officials in the lower house of Parliament. However, the early returns tabulated by the Solidarity Citizens Committee still represented a tiny fraction of the more than 16 million votes cast yesterday, and a final official count was not expected until Wednesday.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This mountain nation's wayward son, Eduard A. Shevardnadze, returned home yesterday, with many of his countrymen hailing him as the only leader capable of ending the political and economic chaos engulfing the former Soviet republic of Georgia. Shevardnadze, who became a world figure during his five years as Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's foreign minister, flew here yesterday with a one-way ticket and the clear intention of becoming his nation's next leader. The sharply dressed Georgian was greeted by a large and adoring crowd at the airport in the capital of Tbilisi and then toured a region plainly suffering from economic disintegration and the military overthrow of the previous Georgian president.
NEWS
July 2, 1988 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this article
Months of simmering political rivalry exploded into rare public view yesterday as former Moscow party boss Boris N. Yeltsin appealed to a special Communist Party conference for his "political rehabilitation," only to be bitterly rebuffed by Yegor K. Ligachev, the Kremlin's number-two leader. The extraordinary drama, which was broadcast on the evening national news and had longtime political observers shaking their heads in wonderment, featured two diametrically opposed feature players in the theater of perestroika: Yeltsin, the vocal reformer, versus Ligachev, the conservative keeper of party ideology.
NEWS
November 22, 1988 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
At first, no one in the packed hall noticed as the nondescript man with the straight gunmetal hair and the gray herringbone suit made his way down the aisle toward the stage. But as he crossed in front, a hush fell and then a buzz began and, finally, spontaneous applause filled the room. Liu Binyan smiled at the reception and strode to a small table at the center of the Dunlop Auditorium stage on the University of Pennsylvania campus. He sat down, sipped some Pepsi from a cup and, for the next 2 1/2 hours, talked virtually nonstop about what he called a developing crisis in China.
NEWS
September 10, 2011
Former Vietnamese President Vo Chi Cong, 99, died Thursday at a hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam's state media said. Mr. Cong was born Vo Toan in central Quang Nam province and joined the Communist Party in 1935. He gradually rose in the ranks. He was appointed deputy prime minister in 1976, a year after the Vietnam War ended, and served as president from 1987 to 1991. After retiring in 1996 as adviser to the ruling Communist Party, he rarely appeared at public events. - AP
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ever since the Communist regimes in Eastern Europe crumbled like a house of cards, the world has wondered when the granddaddy of them all - the Communist Party of the Soviet Union - would take a similar fall. The huge Communist structure here has wobbled under the assaults of glasnost, free elections and separatist movements. But its deep roots at the local level, its 74-year grip on power, have given it immense staying power. Last week, however, the party suffered a blow - a blow from within - that could bring it down.
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NEWS
June 8, 2013
Chen Xitong, 82, the mayor of Beijing during the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests who served jail time for corruption and later condemned the student crackdown he was portrayed as engineering, died of cancer Sunday, the official Xinhua news agency said, two days before the 24th anniversary of the army's attack on the protesters. His jailing in 1998 on graft charges marked one of the highest-level prosecutions of a Communist Party official since the founding of the People's Republic in 1949.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2013 | By Joe McDonald, Associated Press
BEIJING - The global economic malaise has knocked the stuffing out of Luo Yan's business making toy animals. Sales of Hello Kitty dolls and plush rabbits have fallen 30 percent over the last six months, according to Luo, owner of Tongle Toy Enterprise, which employs 100 people in the southern city of Foshan, near Hong Kong. Orders from the United States and debt-crippled Europe are down 80 percent. "We don't talk about profits anymore," said Luo. China's shaky recovery is losing steam, adding to pressure on its new leaders to shore up growth after a surprise first-quarter decline and launch reforms to support entrepreneurs like Luo who create its new jobs and wealth.
NEWS
February 3, 2013
Xu Liangying, 92, a renowned Chinese rights advocate, physicist, and translator of Albert Einstein's writings, died Jan. 28, in Beijing's university district, where he lived for many years. No cause of death was given. Mr. Xu began translating Einstein in 1962 after being forced to leave his job as editor of a leading science journal for criticizing the policies of the Communist Party led by Mao Tse-tung. He was the main translator of the three volumes of The Collected Works of Einstein in Chinese and initiated or wrote numerous letters and petitions defending human rights.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By Joe McDonald, Associated Press
BEIJING - China's new Communist Party leaders promised Sunday to be ready to spend more if needed to shore up a shaky economic recovery and pledged more market-opening reforms. In the first statement of their economic goals, the leadership wrapped up a two-day planning meeting by pledging continuity with earlier party plans aimed at making China's economy more productive and spreading prosperity to its poor. They gave no indication of plans for major changes. The world's second-largest economy is gradually pulling out of its deepest slump since the 2008 global crisis, but weaker-than-expected November trade data prompted suggestions the rebound might be faltering.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
While our political leaders have been beating each other's brains out, so have China's. Communist Party leaders will name a seven- man ruling committee Thursday. Since China is our main world- power rival and top overseas trading partner - a growing focus for Cigna International , DuPont Co. , Dow Chemical, General Motors, Google, TE Connectivity , and other big U.S. companies; a big market for American coal, meat, and grain; and the place our smartphones are made by regimented workers whose low wages are finally rising - you'd think the results mattered to Americans.
NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Louise Watt, Associated Press
BEIJING - China's ruling Communist elite have endorsed the expulsion of former high-flying politician Bo Xilai and approved final preparations for the party's upcoming congress. The closed-door meeting of the Central Committee that ended Sunday was the last before Communist Party leader Hu Jintao and other government officials begin to cede power to Vice President Xi Jinping and others at the congress, which opens Thursday. The Central Committee said in a statement carried by the official Xinhua news agency that it endorsed decisions to expel Bo and former Railways Minister Liu Zhijun from the Communist Party.
NEWS
October 5, 2012
Eric Hobsbawm, 95, honored as one of Britain's most distinguished historians despite retaining an allegiance to the Communist Party that lasted long after many had left in disgust, died Monday at a London hospital after a long battle with leukemia. He was revered for his ability to make history come alive, using his socialist perspective to tell stories from the people's point of view. His reading of Karl Marx and his experience living in Germany in the early 1930s formed his views.
NEWS
September 2, 2012
Chinese official's demotion seen SHANGHAI - Ling Jihua, a senior Chinese official and a close ally of President Hu Jintao, was named on Saturday to a new post in a move that some Communist Party experts said was a demotion and a surprising development ahead of this year's leadership transition. Ling's appointment as head of a department that deals with trade unions and the Dalai Lama was announced online in the People's Daily, the Communist Party newspaper. The party's once-in-a-decade leadership transition has been complicated by the worst political scandal in decades, with the detention of Bo Xilai, who had been a Politburo member, and the conviction of his wife in the death of a British businessman.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Christopher Bodeen, ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIJING - As big city politician Bo Xilai rose to nationwide prominence with an anti-mafia crusade and mass sing-alongs of communist anthems, many of China's leaders trekked to his metropolis approvingly. Not President Hu Jintao. Hu's conspicuous absence from Chongqing, one of China's biggest cities, was telling. The charisma and self-promotion that made Bo popular with many Chinese at times alienated his political peers. On Thursday, the Communist Party sidelined Bo, removing him from his post as Chongqing's Communist Party boss and highest-ranking official, and likely ending his chances of promotion to the highest ranks of power that seemed within grasp only months ago. Tall and telegenic, Bo is an anomaly that proves the rule in Chinese politics.
NEWS
December 14, 2011 | By Jim Heintz, Associated Press
MOSCOW - The new Russian parliament chosen in a fraud-tainted election will go ahead with its first session, President Dmitry A. Medvedev said Tuesday, showing no inclination to bend to unprecedented nationwide protests that drew tens of thousands into the streets. Medvedev acknowledged the vote-fraud complaints but said lawmakers would meet next Wednesday anyway, ignoring demands that officials annul the election and start over. "The State Duma must begin work," he said at a meeting with leaders of the four parties that won parliamentary seats in the Dec. 4 vote.
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