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NEWS
June 1, 2011
IHAPPEN to know Joseph Ligambi (whom the media likes to refer to as "a/k/a Uncle Joe," even though anyone who truly knows him doesn't call him that). He is just like any other father or grandfather in our neighborhood - he's an actual person, not a movie character. For the judge to deny him bail and say he's "a danger to the community" - which community would that be? (Would he like to go north and west of City Hall, then head south and tell us which one is most dangerous?) To characterize a man based on what people see in movies and on TV is unconstitutional and derogatory to his family and nationality.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Kenney campaign is looking for a few good community organizers. Or, to be more accurate, a few good community organizers-to-be. "We want to have anchors in all parts of the city," said Lauren Hitt, spokeswoman for Philadelphia Democratic mayoral candidate Jim Kenney. "We want people who believe in Jim or who believe in their community or who just want a voice in city government. " To that end - and to help register new voters - the campaign is looking for volunteers in its "Summer Organizing Fellowship for Jim Kenney.
NEWS
April 6, 2012
TO CHRIS Vicente: I am one of the idiots, as described in your letter, who is opposed to the voter ID bill. You should change your mind and join in opposing the bill because it undermines our sense of trust and community. When registered voters complete their ballot, they are fulfilling their communal obligation to participate directly in the process of government. When they sign their name in the voter registry, they are affirming that they are exercising their rights as a community member and stepping up to the responsibilities that are entrusted to them as such.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | BY JESSICA GLAZER, Daily News Staff Writer glazerj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5915
TWO YEARS ago, when photographer Tieshka Smith started to document the changes taking place in Germantown, there was no place for her to exhibit her work. Then last year, a community gallery opened on Greene Street, which is where her show, "The Other Germantown," will be on display until Aug. 3. "When it opened, it was like the local community converged on it like an oasis in the desert," she said of the Imperfect Gallery. The first show was so crowded people could barely get in the door, she recalled.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
WHEN ERV Wilson heard the three shots shatter the silence of the early hours of March 6 in the Abbotsford Homes, he had no idea that the bullets had fatally struck a man he knew for almost three decades. "It's sad. When I came across the street and saw him laying there, I didn't know it was him," Wilson, 52, said, motioning toward the spot where someone gunned down Christopher Curry, 41 - a man Wilson had known since childhood - last week in the East Falls housing complex. "The way it went down, it's terrible," said Wilson.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE MUSIC would just have to wait. Whether it was classical, rap or gospel or whatever sounds were filling the Dell Music Center on any given night, Pam Crutchfield's fried-fish sandwiches took precedence. Music fans would stand in long lines to order the sandwiches at the concession stand that Pam operated at the Dell in the '90s and early 2000s. It didn't matter if they missed a few bars of music. You could always hear music, but where else could you find such succulent fare?
NEWS
August 2, 2016
ISSUE | NORMA SHAPIRO An inspiration Senior U.S. District Judge Norma Shapiro was a remarkable jurist, but I remember her for her contributions to the Lower Merion community (" Norma Shapiro; pioneering set prison cap ," July 23). I think of Norma Shapiro as a member and then president of the Lower Merion school board. She treated students, teachers, administrators, and parents with great attention and respect. She was always available to listen privately to one's concerns and suggestions.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Salvatore J. "Sonny" Barbuto, 71, a community labor leader in the region for four decades, died Thursday, Dec. 13, of a pulmonary embolism at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. A longtime South Philadelphia resident and a graduate of Bishop Neumann High School, Mr. Barbuto obtained his bachelor's degree in journalism from Temple University. Mr. Barbuto began his career in 1959 as an administrator for the Retail Clerks Union Local 1360 in South Jersey. He was hired in 1964 by a sister local, Retail Clerks Union 1357, AFL-CIO, in Philadelphia, as executive assistant to the president; the bargaining unit is now the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, Local 1776.
NEWS
March 10, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
Parishioners of St. Martin de Porres Catholic Church mourned slain Philadelphia Police Officer Robert Wilson III on Sunday, embraced his grieving fellow officers, and collected money to help support his two young sons. Wilson, 30, was killed Thursday in a GameStop holdup just two blocks down the street from the gray stone church that serves the Swampoodle neighborhood of North Philadelphia. The death of the officer - who was buying a video game for his 9-year-old son, Quahmier, as a reward for good grades - rocked the region.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do sick people have a right to be treated in their own community? Do residents have a right to say who gets care nearby? The questions have a familiar ring in Northeast Philadelphia, where residents have repeatedly opposed new methadone maintenance clinics, forcing hundreds of their neighbors to travel across the city for care. A new chapter in the debate will open Wednesday, when State Rep. Kevin J. Boyle (D., Phila.) holds a hearing in Mayfair on a bill that would give communities more power over the approval process.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 21, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Two days after Linda Roehner graduated from high school, she started at Hatboro Federal Savings as a teller. Now Roehner, who will turn 55 on Wednesday, runs the place as president and chief executive. "You name it. I did it," she said. "Teller, accounting, loan servicing. " What's it like to be the president of a bank where you started as a teller? It's rewarding. It's nice to know that the board saw my hard work and achievements and rewarded me. It must be inspirational to the tellers.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
The Rev. Willie R. James Sr., 95, of Willingboro, a civil rights pioneer who successfully sued a private developer to racially integrate a neighborhood in that town, died Tuesday, Aug. 2, at the Marcella Center nursing home in Burlington Township. Born Sept. 13, 1920, in Vidalia, La., Rev. James attended all-black schools as a child and went on to attend the historically black Southern University and A&M College in Baton Rouge. In 1941, he was drafted into the Army, where he became an officer in the Criminal Investigation Unit.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
As a pregnant faculty member at Community College of Philadelphia six years ago, Kristy Shuda McGuire would walk through "clouds of smoke" to get into her building. "It really bothered me," said McGuire, an associate biology professor. The college had a ban on smoking inside buildings and near entrances, but that left a lot of areas of campus vulnerable. McGuire got herself on the college's business affairs committee, which deals with building usage, and pushed for tighter restrictions.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Mari Schaefer, Staff Writer
Delaware County Community College graduates are now able to seamlessly transfer to Pennsylvania State University under a recently announced agreement. Students with majors in bachelor of science in biology or business, and bachelor of arts or science in psychology, and have a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 are eligible. Application fees to the university also will be waived, according to officials. Officials noted that Penn State Brandywine in Media, offers the eligible majors and is located close to the DCCC main campus in Marple Township.
NEWS
August 2, 2016
ISSUE | NORMA SHAPIRO An inspiration Senior U.S. District Judge Norma Shapiro was a remarkable jurist, but I remember her for her contributions to the Lower Merion community (" Norma Shapiro; pioneering set prison cap ," July 23). I think of Norma Shapiro as a member and then president of the Lower Merion school board. She treated students, teachers, administrators, and parents with great attention and respect. She was always available to listen privately to one's concerns and suggestions.
NEWS
August 1, 2016
Marcus Allen is the CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters Independence Region In Pedagogy of the Oppressed , Brazilian author and scholar Paulo Freire states, "No one can be authentically human while he prevents others from being so. " I've been thinking a lot lately about this idea of humanity, and who is afforded the privilege of being perceived as fully human. In recent months we too often watched as black men and women had their lives taken at the hands of police, and we also witnessed the murder of police officers.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, STAFF WRITER
Joe Prete, who grew up in Norristown, spent much of the years 2006 to 2014 as an Army infantryman in Iraq and Afghanistan. Today, he's a home contractor and has applied to become a police officer in his hometown. His friend Markus Ismael spent five years in the Air Force in the 1990s, and now works in technology services at the Hill School in Pottstown. Prete, 29, and Ismael, 45, met on Facebook, drawn together by their military service and their participation in a 12-hour endurance event based on experiences of Special Forces soldiers.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Rashad Robinson
  'Look at my African American over here. " When Donald Trump pointed out a black man at a California rally, social media erupted: Here was a man running the most racist campaign in decades trying to use the language of diversity for electoral gain. But here's a dirty little secret: Trump's contradictions when it comes to black people are the norm in American politics. Politicians on both sides of the aisle have long used black communities as pawns in their political chess game, each capitalizing on the symbolism of "blackness" to serve their parties' electoral needs.
NEWS
July 27, 2016 | By Vibha Kannan, Staff Writer
THE PLAYGROUND at Jenks Academy for the Arts and Sciences in Chestnut Hill - with its spacious sandbox and chunky wood structures - is a place of imagination, as Eden Kainer describes it. In a city of cracked asphalt schoolyards, Jenks' playground is a model of green architecture. But in the cash-starved Philadelphia School District, playground equipment and green fields are secondary to more urgent needs - such as replacing fire alarms, hiring nurses, buying books, and repairing decades-old buildings.
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