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NEWS
April 9, 2008 | By ED SCHWARTZ
WITH INCREASING concern in Philadelphia over the lack of attention being paid to urban issues in the presidential campaign, here are 10 questions that might be raised with Sens. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama in their debate on April 16 or in their various appearances in the area between now and the primary. 1. Do you see the strengthening of America's cities and improving the quality of life for urban residents as an important priority for your administration? 2. How specifically would your proposals to address America's foreclosure crisis protect urban residents from losing their homes?
NEWS
February 19, 1987 | By Ellen Pulver, Special to The Inquirer
Glenolden Borough Council voted Tuesday night to apply for up to $60,000 in federal money to study the borough's sewer system. About half the borough has been designated by the Delaware County Planning Department as a lower-income area, and will be targeted in the sewer-system study, said Councilwoman Margaret Oravez. According to the grant application's guidelines, the project should primarily benefit lower-income households or a lower-income area. The county Planning Department will handle the application for the money.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | by john rowe
A FINANCIAL SETBACK can strike any family at any time, due to job loss, an unexpected illness, or sudden major expenses related to care for an elderly parent or sick child. For middle-class families, the response may be to forego a summer vacation or cut back on holiday spending. For lower-income families, the result may be the inability to pay the utilities. According to the Colorado Energy Assistance Foundation, the inability to pay utilities is a leading cause of homelessness, second only to the inability to pay rent.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The federal government plans to give the borough $116,000 more in community development block grant funds this year than it did last year, according to borough officials. And borough officials have earmarked that money for improving parks, housing projects and nonprofit organizations. Last year, Norristown received about $1 million in such grants, said borough director of Planning and Municipal Development, Judith Memberg. The community development block grant program provides financial aid for blighted areas.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | By Kevin McKinney, Special to The Inquirer
Coatesville City Council will seek a three-year $962,000 grant from the Chester County Redevelopment Authority for several projects, including housing rehabilitation, a smoke-detection program, street repaving and recreational parks over the next three years. The council Monday night authorized applying to the county for the Community Development Block Grant funds. The city will meet the county's filing deadline, which is today. Coatesville City Manager Ted Reed said the city had "proven our success in the last three years in administering (block grant)
NEWS
September 19, 1986 | By Russell Cooke and Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Federal housing officials, who recently lifted a ban on the spending of the city's $52 million in Community Development Block Grant funds, imposed new conditions yesterday that must be met to head off a 25 percent reduction in the city's renewed grant. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has drawn up a list of conditions limiting the use of the city's block grant funds for the coming fiscal year - which starts Oct. 1 - and has called for "management corrections" at the city's housing agencies, according to government sources in Philadelphia and in Washington.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
A sanitary sewer-line problem on Cedar Avenue has prompted the Darby Borough Council to revise its 1987 application for federal Community Development Block Grant funds. The council's grants committee Wednesday night approved a new application for sewer-line reconstruction in a two-block stretch of the road in place of three projects that have received tentative approval from the Delaware County Council. "We're sticking our necks out a bit with this revision, because we could end up with nothing," said Maurice Millison, a council member and grants committee chairman.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | By Rich Henson, Inquirer Staff Writer
A host of communities would start housing rehab programs, some senior citizens' centers would get face lifts, a handful of roads would be repaired and the handicapped would find the bathrooms more accessible at Hickory Park in Upper Uwchlan under a grant proposal approved by the Chester County Commissioners. In all, 26 Chester County municipalities and 13 agencies have won preliminary approval for various projects through the Community Development Block Grant program. The grant allocations, which cover a three-year period, were tentatively approved by the Chester County Commissioners on Wednesday.
NEWS
March 10, 1995 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The City Council yesterday transferred millions of dollars in federal Community Development Block Grant funds from the Chester Redevelopment Authority to the new Chester Economic Development Authority. The move was the culmination of a protracted power struggle between Mayor Barbara Bohannan-Sheppard, who appoints the Redevelopment Authority board, and a bipartisan council coalition that created the Economic Development Authority last month. The Economic Development Authority already administers about $3.5 million of Chester's economic development funds.
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The federal government will soon free up more than $11 million in low- income economic development funds it froze earlier this year after a battle for control of the money erupted between the City Council and the mayor. Joyce Gaskins, a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development regional director of community planning and development, said yesterday that the money would be available in about two weeks, after some paperwork is processed. She said that an additional $2.2 million Community Development Block Grant allocation for 1995 would also become available within a few weeks.
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NEWS
June 6, 2012 | by john rowe
A FINANCIAL SETBACK can strike any family at any time, due to job loss, an unexpected illness, or sudden major expenses related to care for an elderly parent or sick child. For middle-class families, the response may be to forego a summer vacation or cut back on holiday spending. For lower-income families, the result may be the inability to pay the utilities. According to the Colorado Energy Assistance Foundation, the inability to pay utilities is a leading cause of homelessness, second only to the inability to pay rent.
NEWS
April 9, 2008 | By ED SCHWARTZ
WITH INCREASING concern in Philadelphia over the lack of attention being paid to urban issues in the presidential campaign, here are 10 questions that might be raised with Sens. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama in their debate on April 16 or in their various appearances in the area between now and the primary. 1. Do you see the strengthening of America's cities and improving the quality of life for urban residents as an important priority for your administration? 2. How specifically would your proposals to address America's foreclosure crisis protect urban residents from losing their homes?
NEWS
June 6, 2003 | By Leonard N. Fleming and Anthony S. Twyman INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Street's Neighborhood Transformation Initiative budget passed yesterday after a grueling week in City Council, but the $121 million package now includes financing to help three affordable-housing programs. For the fourth day, angry residents went to Council to pound the administration over the anti-blight initiative and what they say is a move to snatch properties without sufficient notice in the name of neighborhood improvement. Even Sam Katz, Street's opponent in the mayoral race, showed up to bash the administration over its failure to soothe residents' fears of losing their homes.
NEWS
December 11, 1996 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Delaware County Council yesterday announced a settlement with the federal government over more than $5 million that had allegedly been misused by the county's former economic development agency. The settlement with the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development will free up more than $3 million that had been frozen in loan accounts of the now-defunct Delaware County Partnership for Economic Development since 1990. The money will now be put back into the county Community Development Block Grant program to create jobs or to benefit low- and moderate-income residents, county officials said yesterday.
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The federal government will soon free up more than $11 million in low- income economic development funds it froze earlier this year after a battle for control of the money erupted between the City Council and the mayor. Joyce Gaskins, a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development regional director of community planning and development, said yesterday that the money would be available in about two weeks, after some paperwork is processed. She said that an additional $2.2 million Community Development Block Grant allocation for 1995 would also become available within a few weeks.
NEWS
March 10, 1995 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The City Council yesterday transferred millions of dollars in federal Community Development Block Grant funds from the Chester Redevelopment Authority to the new Chester Economic Development Authority. The move was the culmination of a protracted power struggle between Mayor Barbara Bohannan-Sheppard, who appoints the Redevelopment Authority board, and a bipartisan council coalition that created the Economic Development Authority last month. The Economic Development Authority already administers about $3.5 million of Chester's economic development funds.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The federal government plans to give the borough $116,000 more in community development block grant funds this year than it did last year, according to borough officials. And borough officials have earmarked that money for improving parks, housing projects and nonprofit organizations. Last year, Norristown received about $1 million in such grants, said borough director of Planning and Municipal Development, Judith Memberg. The community development block grant program provides financial aid for blighted areas.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | By Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The impoverished City of Chester could quickly tap $9.6 million in federal aid but has failed to complete the minimal requirements to free the funding, a HUD spokesman said yesterday. Michael Zerega of the Department of Housing and Urban Development said he told Chester Mayor Barbara Bohannan-Sheppard early yesterday that "we're not happy" that Chester had not availed itself of $3.6 million in Community Development Block Grant funds and $6 million in Urban Development Action Grant money.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | By Kevin McKinney, Special to The Inquirer
Coatesville City Council will seek a three-year $962,000 grant from the Chester County Redevelopment Authority for several projects, including housing rehabilitation, a smoke-detection program, street repaving and recreational parks over the next three years. The council Monday night authorized applying to the county for the Community Development Block Grant funds. The city will meet the county's filing deadline, which is today. Coatesville City Manager Ted Reed said the city had "proven our success in the last three years in administering (block grant)
NEWS
November 21, 1988
City Council just received $750,000 to give Class 500 goodies to its favorite community organizations. This concludes a protracted battle between the administration and Council. The mayor took charge of the Class 500 grant program after Council made a mess of the process. Then the mayor proceeded to make a mess of the process. Some Council members' pet projects were slighted, so Council got mad and refused to pass a transfer ordinance needed to keep the city government operating.
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