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NEWS
October 4, 2012 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer
THERE SHOULD BE a moratorium on closing public schools in the city because the Philadelphia School District's plans disproportionately affect black students, a community group will allege in a federal complaint. ACTION United plans to file a complaint Wednesday with the Office of Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education. Action United cited data that six of eight district schools that have closed or have begun phasing out this year have at least 13 percent more black students than the district average.
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A longtime West Philadelphia community group filed a federal lawsuit Tuesday against Councilwoman Jannie L. Blackwell, alleging that she has tried to ruin it so that another group she has favored could take a leading role in the Mantua section. The suit also alleges that Blackwell struck and injured a woman last year with a side-view mirror as the councilwoman drove away from a community meeting. Blackwell could not be reached Tuesday for comment. Mantua Community Planners and the Rev. Andrew Jenkins, who helped form the group in the 1960s, had offices in the James L. Wright Recreation Center at 34th Street and Haverford Avenue since it opened in 1978.
NEWS
November 13, 2008 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The demise of a neighborhood happens slowly. But the demise of a community organization created to save that neighborhood can happen quickly. So quickly, in fact, that some of the organization's members might not even know it's happening. For more than a decade, United Neighbors of Whitman Park has offered summer and after-school programs from a storefront community center in one of the poorest, most dangerous neighborhoods of Camden, Whitman Park. But some volunteers grew too old to help out. Or died.
SPORTS
August 11, 1999 | By Christopher K. Hepp, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael Volpe holds a fairly firm position on the proposed new baseball park at Broad and Spring Garden Streets - he's solidly in the middle. As president of the Logan Square Neighborhood Association, which takes in the site of the proposed stadium, Volpe represents the group of residents to be most affected if the park becomes a reality. From the Phillies' standpoint, his neutrality suggests that his community group might ultimately be convinced to align itself with the new park.
NEWS
June 16, 1993 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two groups yesterday poured their resources into a few North Camden cellar holes. A crew of 15 city carpenters, masons and laborers, hired by a nonprofit organization, toiled their way up State Street through a row of once incinerated, now gutted brick rowhouses. And six blocks to the south, in the seventh-floor opulence of the Harbour League Club, representatives of seven commercial banks and a second nonprofit group announced the creation of a $3.2 million fund, some of the money destined for the five buildings being rehabilitated on State Street.
NEWS
July 27, 1994 | By Larry Copeland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's late on a summer afternoon as about 60 people gather in a small church on Lehigh Avenue in North Philadelphia. They're the working poor, mostly, and their steps betray the strains of the day's labor as they trudge in to learn how to buy homes. Muted sunlight streaming through the church's stained-glass windows suffuses their weary faces. Hope does, too. For many residents of this area of the city, bounded by Somerset, Huntingdon, 24th and 33d Streets, it often has been hard to cling to hope.
NEWS
December 28, 2006 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A mutiny is brewing in Brewerytown. And it centers on Aazim Muhammad, the executive director of the Brewerytown Community Development Corp. (CDC). As Brewerytown has evolved in three years from a forgotten corner of North Philadelphia into a quickly gentrifying community, Muhammad has been a well-spoken proponent of that change. He has endorsed three big projects at city meetings and talked up the benefits of all the new development. In return, developers have donated $75,000 to the Brewerytown group, while two have spent $300,000 to renovate space in the old Acme warehouse at 30th and Master Streets for an office and computer center for the organization.
NEWS
February 9, 2004 | By Murray Dubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On East Passyunk Avenue, you can be manipulated by a chiropractor, cushioned by an upholsterer, and remembered eternally by a headstone maker. And you also can have your motives questioned, especially if you are Vincent J. Fumo, you're a state senator, and you've helped form a nonprofit group that has more than $35 million to spend - money that you've raised very quietly, including $17 million from Peco Energy Co. The Peco money, which the...
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
A community group has endorsed plans for a 178-unit apartment project with 20,000 feet of street-level retail at the current site of the Woods Bros. lumber yard in East Kensington. The East Kensington Neighbors Association voted 61-to-33 at a meeting last week in favor of the so-called Woods Square project at 2621 Frankford Ave., the group's zoning chair, John Theobald, said. Developer Michael Vegh's plans for the two-acre site show three five-floor residential structures rising over a green roof atop a single-story podium of shops and parking.
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NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
A community group has endorsed plans for a 178-unit apartment project with 20,000 feet of street-level retail at the current site of the Woods Bros. lumber yard in East Kensington. The East Kensington Neighbors Association voted 61-to-33 at a meeting last week in favor of the so-called Woods Square project at 2621 Frankford Ave., the group's zoning chair, John Theobald, said. Developer Michael Vegh's plans for the two-acre site show three five-floor residential structures rising over a green roof atop a single-story podium of shops and parking.
NEWS
March 31, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
A group of young men and women are launching a project in West Philadelphia's Carroll Park section next week that they hope will develop programming to help divert their peers from the streets in violent neighborhoods. Starting Thursday, five young people ages 15 to 23 will recruit residents to complete a survey at the Carroll Park Center for Hope, Help, and Healing, said Latisha Webb, who with her husband, William, founded Opportunity Inc., a community group assisting with the effort.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ahead of what promises to be a contentious City Council zoning hearing Monday, the partnership planning to build the $450 million Live! Hotel & Casino in South Philadelphia said Thursday that it had won the support of the five community groups in neighborhoods surrounding the proposed development. Stadium Casino L.L.C., a partnership between Cordish Cos. of Baltimore and Greenwood Gaming & Entertainment Inc., which owns Bensalem's Parx Casino, said its community-benefits agreement established a charitable fund that will disburse at least $15 million in grants over the next 20 years.
NEWS
October 22, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
DURING CAR RIDES, Duval "DJ" DeShields clamored to listen to "Your Mother," a song by Yusuf Islam released in 2003. "Put on Track 8," he'd tell Donna Baldwin, a former neighbor in the PHA Harrison Plaza development who played her copy of Islam's CD "I Look I See" most weekends when driving DeShields and her son "Quany the Clown" to parties where they entertained children with hip-hop dance. "Who should I give my love to?" Islam, formerly known as Cat Stevens, would sing. "My respect and my honor to?
NEWS
August 4, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
To 13-year-old Keyanna Phipps, on TV shows and in the news, police officers seem scary. "They're like shooting and attacking people for no reason," she said. But the officers in the square-mile borough that she calls home, Kennett Square, are different. "They don't seem like those kind of people," she said. Her opinion of the 14-member police department in Chester County has a lot to do with the efforts of her neighbors. The residents of the East Linden section of Kennett Square have made it their business to make sure the youngsters get to know the police and that the police do the same.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
JUSTIN PARKER learned much more on his neighborhood basketball court than how to shoot a free throw. "I learned how to treat people," the 17-year-old said of his time on the pavement in Oxford Circle. "Being on that court taught me respect. " Chad Dion Lassiter, sitting inside a packed gym in South Philly last night, beamed at Parker's words and offered him a fist bump. If there were a poster child for "Brotherhood and Basketball" - as the event was titled - it would be Parker, a young African-American who found direction and focus through love of the sport.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
JOHN WISNIEWSKI, 60, says he has been with St. Laurentius Church in Fishtown all his life. His parents and grandparents were married there, and he was baptized there. A.J. Thompson, 38, left another church two years ago to join St. Laurentius, a church he found "welcoming," he said. Now, both men are furious with the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, which announced yesterday that it would proceed to demolish the 133-year-old building at Berks and Memphis streets, the oldest Polish church in the city.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of clergy gathered for a special service Wednesday night in North Philadelphia focused on justice in response to police killings of African Americans. The program at New Vision United Methodist Church on North Broad Street was titled "Strange Fruit: The Seven Last Words of Seven Black Lives. " The name is in part a reference to the traditional Holy Week sermon about the last words of Jesus on the cross. It also was inspired by Strange Fruit, the poem about racism and the lynchings of African Americans that Billie Holiday turned into a song.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A SOUTH Philadelphia church and a Mount Airy Jewish community group will offer sanctuary to undocumented immigrants as part of a nationwide civil act of disobedience in response to President Obama's inaction on immigration reform. Each congregation will open its doors to house an undocumented immigrant - who will be defying a federal deportation order - and his or her family. This act of civil disobedience is part of a National Day of Action, said Peter Pedemonti, director of the New Sanctuary Movement of Philadelphia, which will hold a news conference today at the Philadelphia Praise Center, on McKean Street near 17th.
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sale of William Penn High School to Temple University, blocked temporarily by a community group's legal action, will go through after all, officials said Friday. Inez Henderson-Purnell, president of the William Penn Development Coalition, said the group withdrew action against the transfer of the deed for William Penn, a sprawling school complex on North Broad Street. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court had denied the group's request for injunctive relief. "We fought the good fight," Henderson-Purnell said in a statement.
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