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NEWS
February 28, 1990 | By Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
Madaline Dunn "got a feeling" from the leaders of the 300 Overbrook High School students who walked out of school last week to protest what they said was a racist article written by an Overbrook teacher. The feeling was anguish and frustration. It was the feeling of being the target of racism. Dunn, a community leader, felt she had been judged because of her race, "not on what I have inside," she said, touching her heart. "They look at your skin and kind of slough you off. " She and about 60 parents, students and community leaders met at Overbrook High last night to discuss the walkout and to let the students know they were proud of them.
NEWS
July 22, 2002 | By Vern Anastasio
There is a single character in the Chinese alphabet, which, depending on how it is used, can stand for either "crisis" or "opportunity. " Here we are at the dawn of the 21st century, a new beginning in America, and Philadelphia, the most amazing of urban places, is forced to apply this character to its future, to its neighborhoods and to its families. Despite the amazing revitalization of Center City, the City of Neighborhoods consistently loses population. Four hundred thousand residents have departed since 1950, and 68,000 residents fled during the booming 1990s.
NEWS
December 22, 1994 | By Amy S. Rosenberg and Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writer Vanessa Williams contributed to this article
Officials in Philadelphia and Camden assured community leaders yesterday that the neighborhoods themselves would have a leading voice in determining how the $100 million flowing into the empowerment zone over the next two years will be spent. "I support community involvement to the nth degree," said Mayor Arnold W. Webster of Camden. Mayor Rendell outlined a process in which community leaders would be elected to community trust boards that would set the budget for spending the federal money.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | By Jody Benjamin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A proposal to create a municipal commission to help improve relations between diverse groups of residents has the unanimous support of council, but is getting a lukewarm reception from some community leaders and the mayor. Mayor George Ruch, a Republican, has told business administrator William Fiscella that he does not intend to appoint members to the Human Relations Committee if it is approved by council. Ruch will finish a two-year term as mayor in December and will not seek a second term.
NEWS
June 12, 1992 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Several North Philadelphia community leaders have rallied to the defense of a troubled mental-health service, hoping to pursuade the city to reverse its decision to cancel its $8 million contract. But Health Commissioner Robert Ross, saying he wants an organization that can provide "excellent services, yet be accountable to the terms of the contract," is standing firm in his decision. The controversy involves the Charles R. Drew Community Mental Health/Mental Retardation Center, which is headquartered at Broad Street and Old York Road in Logan and operates seven clinics.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | By Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City officials and community leaders have been quietly discussing plans to help keep Philadelphia calm if an acquittal in the Rodney King federal trial reignites violence in Los Angeles. But most are predicting that Philadelphia will remain immune from the rioting that nearly destroyed South Central Los Angeles and left small scars in other cities last spring after four Los Angeles police officers were acquitted in the beating of King. "Philadelphia behaved in just a sterling fashion after the last verdict, and we have every expectation our population will respond in the exact same way in the event of an adverse verdict this time," David L. Cohen, Mayor Rendell's chief of staff, said yesterday.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | By Peter Smolowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Community members would help teach students how to become successful adults under a program outlined yesterday by West Chester Area School District officials and community leaders. "Healthy Communities/Healthy Youth" calls for community members to help children learn 40 positive traits, including integrity, responsibility and self-esteem, said Superintendent Janet Shaner. Those teaching such values would include families, businesses, government agencies, religious organizations and civic groups, she said.
NEWS
March 12, 2006 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A half-dozen community leaders from Louisiana visited a firehouse in a quiet neighborhood of Upper Darby yesterday to say thanks to the people of Southeastern Pennsylvania for tons - literally, tons - of help in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. And they got a little more help in the process - a $440,000 check for hurricane relief raised from businesses and individual local donors. R. David Paulison, acting director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, came up from Washington for the gathering at the Primose-Secane-Westbrook Fire Company.
NEWS
August 12, 1993 | By Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite six weeks of canvassing, cajoling and counseling, the city's summer immunization project is about halfway short of its goal of giving free shots to 5,000 Philadelphia children. So yesterday, Mayor Rendell and City Health Commissioner Robert K. Ross held a pep rally to energize about 150 community leaders, who were asked to help the city reach its goal before the program ends next Thursday. "We have seven working days to go on the ICARE project," Rendell said, referring to the acronym for the federally funded Immunize Children at Early Risk program.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | By Jeff Eckhoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Backed by a chorus of black community leaders charging racism, Eleanor "Betty" Loper, president of West Chester's Borough Council and its only African American member, has thwarted an attempt to boot her from office. Loper, all but out the door when Wednesday's council meeting began, ended up with a tighter grip than ever on West Chester's political power. Councilwoman Janet Colliton and former Council President Mitch Crane, two of her most vocal critics and supporters of the attempted ouster, announced they would resign.
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NEWS
August 20, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frances P. Aulston, 75, founder and executive director of the West Philadelphia Cultural Alliance and a moving force in the preservation of the Paul Robeson House, died Sunday, Aug. 9. Her family declined to release the location and cause of her death. A Philadelphia resident, community leader, and activist, Ms. Aulston was a former research librarian for the Free Library of Philadelphia. In 1984, Ms. Aulston founded the West Philadelphia Cultural Alliance (WPCA) with the help of several local artists.
NEWS
August 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Paul Knox, 87, formerly of Oreland, a lawyer in Montgomery County for many years, died Tuesday, July 21, of cancer at Westminster Canterbury of the Blue Ridge, a retirement community in Charlottesville, Va. Mr. Knox and his wife, Eleanor, had moved to Westminster Canterbury in 2006. The son of Paul Waddell Knox and Florence Welch Knox, Mr. Knox grew up in Chestnut Hill and graduated in January 1946 from Central High School. He began early studies at Yale University in the fall of 1945.
NEWS
May 29, 2015
PHILADELPHIANS ARE passionate about fighting for quality public education. We have marched in the streets countless times. We deserve high quality public neighborhood schools and a school district that listens to us as students, parents and community leaders - and we are willing to fight for it. Unfortunately, the school district has shown again that it is unwilling to take our voices into account and is pushing through a school-closure plan in Kensington....
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
GREGORY "CHOPS" Scott's family loved him so much that when he was murdered in 2013, his nephew - whose bride Scott had offered to walk down the aisle - got married at his uncle's funeral so he could still be a part of their wedding. Scott's community loved him so much that more than 2,000 people attended his service. It seems only one person in this world didn't get along with Scott - his own cousin, James Scott - and yesterday it took a jury less than an hour to convict James Scott of first-degree murder for the killing of Gregory Scott, 55, outside of his West Philadelphia home on Feb. 27, 2013.
NEWS
March 3, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
COMMUNITY relations and departmental oversight took top billing in a report released Monday by a presidential panel co-chaired by Philly's top cop to improve policing across the country. The report was compiled by the 11-member Task Force on 21st Century Policing after 90 days of research that included seven "listening sessions" featuring testimony on best practices from government officials, law-enforcement officers, academics and community leaders. "The report is a step in the right direction, but more work needs to be done, not just by us, but with implementation," Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey told the  Daily News  on Monday in a phone interview from Washington.
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
PERRY FENNELL had this peculiar habit. A dedicated runner, he always searched the ground ahead for a penny. He probably wouldn't have turned down something with a larger value, but it was a penny he coveted. "He always felt it was a special day when he found a penny," his family said. Perry, a prominent dentist and longtime community leader, ran the annual Broad Street Run, a number of other races, and one marathon. What did he do with the pennies? He collected them in jars, and, knowing what kind of a man he was, he probably ended up using them in some worthy cause or other.
NEWS
November 24, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
IN THE FIRST HALF of 2014, the people of Lawncrest had lost hope. Having two high-profile murders take place about one month, and 1 mile, apart will do that to any neighborhood, especially one that was known for decades as a peaceful haven for blue-collar workers. But now, as 2014 draws to a close, community leaders are noticing a marked change in their neighbors' attitudes. And it wasn't for a lack of trying. "In the beginning, when it was fresh, everybody was in shock," said Jean Pleis, the treasurer of the Lawncrest Community Association.
NEWS
November 21, 2014
THANK YOU to the 700-plus people who showed up at Stella Maris Hall to make their feelings clearly known about the very negative prospect of a casino at 10th and Packer. The meeting was hugely united in opposition to a local casino despite some intimidation and a few "planted" speakers who were in attendance to arouse discord against the community leaders who have devoted their time and energy from day one to fight this deadly project. We apologize to everyone who reported feeling intimidated - however, we purposely chose not to limit the audience or the speakers, feeling that an open meeting was more transparent and honest.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
T HE PAST AND future of North Philadelphia will be the topic of four gatherings this week. Tomorrow, the Wagner Free Institute of Science will screen archival news footage, donated to Temple University Library by 6ABC News,in a program called "Unedited North Philadelphia: Girard to Lehigh. " The program, from 6 to 8 p.m., is free. The institute, which has been on Montgomery Avenue near 17th Street since 1865, will accept donations. Ken Scott, president of the Beech Companies, will moderate a panel discussion afterward.
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