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NEWS
February 28, 1990 | By Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
Madaline Dunn "got a feeling" from the leaders of the 300 Overbrook High School students who walked out of school last week to protest what they said was a racist article written by an Overbrook teacher. The feeling was anguish and frustration. It was the feeling of being the target of racism. Dunn, a community leader, felt she had been judged because of her race, "not on what I have inside," she said, touching her heart. "They look at your skin and kind of slough you off. " She and about 60 parents, students and community leaders met at Overbrook High last night to discuss the walkout and to let the students know they were proud of them.
NEWS
July 22, 2002 | By Vern Anastasio
There is a single character in the Chinese alphabet, which, depending on how it is used, can stand for either "crisis" or "opportunity. " Here we are at the dawn of the 21st century, a new beginning in America, and Philadelphia, the most amazing of urban places, is forced to apply this character to its future, to its neighborhoods and to its families. Despite the amazing revitalization of Center City, the City of Neighborhoods consistently loses population. Four hundred thousand residents have departed since 1950, and 68,000 residents fled during the booming 1990s.
NEWS
December 22, 1994 | By Amy S. Rosenberg and Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writer Vanessa Williams contributed to this article
Officials in Philadelphia and Camden assured community leaders yesterday that the neighborhoods themselves would have a leading voice in determining how the $100 million flowing into the empowerment zone over the next two years will be spent. "I support community involvement to the nth degree," said Mayor Arnold W. Webster of Camden. Mayor Rendell outlined a process in which community leaders would be elected to community trust boards that would set the budget for spending the federal money.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | By Jody Benjamin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A proposal to create a municipal commission to help improve relations between diverse groups of residents has the unanimous support of council, but is getting a lukewarm reception from some community leaders and the mayor. Mayor George Ruch, a Republican, has told business administrator William Fiscella that he does not intend to appoint members to the Human Relations Committee if it is approved by council. Ruch will finish a two-year term as mayor in December and will not seek a second term.
NEWS
June 12, 1992 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Several North Philadelphia community leaders have rallied to the defense of a troubled mental-health service, hoping to pursuade the city to reverse its decision to cancel its $8 million contract. But Health Commissioner Robert Ross, saying he wants an organization that can provide "excellent services, yet be accountable to the terms of the contract," is standing firm in his decision. The controversy involves the Charles R. Drew Community Mental Health/Mental Retardation Center, which is headquartered at Broad Street and Old York Road in Logan and operates seven clinics.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | By Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City officials and community leaders have been quietly discussing plans to help keep Philadelphia calm if an acquittal in the Rodney King federal trial reignites violence in Los Angeles. But most are predicting that Philadelphia will remain immune from the rioting that nearly destroyed South Central Los Angeles and left small scars in other cities last spring after four Los Angeles police officers were acquitted in the beating of King. "Philadelphia behaved in just a sterling fashion after the last verdict, and we have every expectation our population will respond in the exact same way in the event of an adverse verdict this time," David L. Cohen, Mayor Rendell's chief of staff, said yesterday.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | By Peter Smolowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Community members would help teach students how to become successful adults under a program outlined yesterday by West Chester Area School District officials and community leaders. "Healthy Communities/Healthy Youth" calls for community members to help children learn 40 positive traits, including integrity, responsibility and self-esteem, said Superintendent Janet Shaner. Those teaching such values would include families, businesses, government agencies, religious organizations and civic groups, she said.
NEWS
March 12, 2006 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A half-dozen community leaders from Louisiana visited a firehouse in a quiet neighborhood of Upper Darby yesterday to say thanks to the people of Southeastern Pennsylvania for tons - literally, tons - of help in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. And they got a little more help in the process - a $440,000 check for hurricane relief raised from businesses and individual local donors. R. David Paulison, acting director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, came up from Washington for the gathering at the Primose-Secane-Westbrook Fire Company.
NEWS
August 12, 1993 | By Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite six weeks of canvassing, cajoling and counseling, the city's summer immunization project is about halfway short of its goal of giving free shots to 5,000 Philadelphia children. So yesterday, Mayor Rendell and City Health Commissioner Robert K. Ross held a pep rally to energize about 150 community leaders, who were asked to help the city reach its goal before the program ends next Thursday. "We have seven working days to go on the ICARE project," Rendell said, referring to the acronym for the federally funded Immunize Children at Early Risk program.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | By Jeff Eckhoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Backed by a chorus of black community leaders charging racism, Eleanor "Betty" Loper, president of West Chester's Borough Council and its only African American member, has thwarted an attempt to boot her from office. Loper, all but out the door when Wednesday's council meeting began, ended up with a tighter grip than ever on West Chester's political power. Councilwoman Janet Colliton and former Council President Mitch Crane, two of her most vocal critics and supporters of the attempted ouster, announced they would resign.
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NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edwin J. Poplawski, 88, of Springfield, Delaware County, a banker, World War II veteran, and community organizer, died Wednesday, July 9, of lung cancer at Vitas Hospice at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital. Mr. Poplawski worked for 23 years at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia and another 23 years at the First Pennsylvania Bank before retiring as an assistant vice president in 1989. As part of his job, Mr. Poplawski created and launched technical designs in the areas of computer automation, advanced security functions, and data integrity and controls.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A coalition of about 20 African American community activists announced plans Friday to develop an agenda for reducing poverty in Philadelphia's black community. Known collectively as the Philadelphia Community of Leaders, the group said during a news conference at Laborers District Council headquarters that it planned to address the difficult issue of poverty by focusing on improving education and economic development and reducing violence. The nonprofit group, which includes developers Kenny Gamble and Rahim Islam, lawyer George Burrell, antiviolence activist Bilal Qayyum, and former School Reform Commission Chairwoman Sandra Dungee Glenn, also announced it would host its first community conference at 8:30 a.m. Saturday at Universal Audenried High School, 3301 Tasker St. The event, which is open to the public, will allow members to present their issues and goals and engage members of the community, Islam said.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
MARCELLUS TEMPLE'S kid brother got his butt handed to him in a fistfight on the hardscrabble streets of North Philly last Sunday. After the fight, Temple's little brother went home to lick his wounds and figure out his next move. Revenge . The 16-year-old needed revenge. He turned to Temple, 25, for help. Cops say the two brothers then armed themselves with two handguns and returned to Gratz and Oxford streets, the site of the lopsided fistfight, and started blasting away.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Willard S. Boothby Jr., 92, of Bryn Mawr and Jupiter, Fla., a respected leader in Philadelphia's business and philanthropic communities, died Saturday, March 22, of complications after a fall, at his Florida home. A Philadelphia native, Mr. Boothby was managing director of Paine Webber & Co., a stock brokerage and asset management firm, before retiring in the early 1990s. But he found time to take a leadership role in many local institutions, including as president of the Academy of Music and as a director of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF PEOPLE IN the Melrose Park Gardens neighborhood had a problem like vandalism, drug dealing, etc., they wouldn't call the cops directly. They would call Ed Roberson. Ed had the cellphone number of the captain of the 35th District and he would make the calls. Because Ed was recognized as a longtime leader of the community and one who cared deeply about its welfare, he would invariably get the action he sought. At election time, Ed invited candidates to meetings he organized at churches or other locations to talk with the voters.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE AIR WAS redolent of charred wood, the furniture black with soot, half-burned papers were strewn about - but in the cherished tradition of journalism, the staff got the newspaper out. Someone had deliberately set a Dumpster on fire in 1998 outside the building in North Philadelphia where the weekly Community Focus was being published, and the fire spread into the building. Drug dealers were believed responsible, angered by editorials demanding they be shut down. But this wasn't the first time the newspaper was the target of somebody's anger.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan S. Davis, 75, a former fourth-grade teacher, longtime Camden community leader, and vice chair of the Cooper Health System's board of trustees, died of lung cancer Saturday. Mrs. Davis, of Camden, underwent chemotherapy for three years before she succumbed to the disease at Cooper University Hospital, said Theodore Z. Davis, her husband of 53 years and a retired state Superior Court judge. He was the city's chief administrator from 2006 to 2009, during the state's takeover of Camden.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
TUCKED AWAY under a canopy of trees in the heart of Germantown is Maplewood Mall, a quaint, narrow street long past its glory days but - in the eyes of some community leaders - full of potential. This weekend, in what organizers hope will open the rest of the community's eyes about opportunities along the stretch, Maplewood Mall will come alive with a "Reimagine Maplewood Mall" block party on Saturday. The brainchild of a handful of community leaders, the party will feature live music, food from local restaurants, the work of area artists and activities for kids.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
VIVIAN HUGHES remembers the days when the streets in the Abbotsford Homes were alive with the sound of children playing double Dutch and marbles outside - a time when the community was a safe haven for its youngest and oldest members. Now, Hughes, 70, and other longtime tenants of the public-housing development, perched high on a hill in East Falls near the Roosevelt Expressway, say the violence in their community - and the stigma that's come with it - needs to be turned around. So she, along with a handful of other residents who were newly elected to Abbotsford's revamped tenant council, are banking on a resurgence in the tight-knit community.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gregory Scott was trying to protect his mother's West Philadelphia front porch. The community leader known to friends as "Chops" lost his life Wednesday night in an ongoing dispute to keep an unwelcome relative away from the Delancey Street home, family members said. Thursday night, two men - including a cousin of the victim's - were charged in his slaying. Police said James Scott, the cousin, shot Gregory Scott after the latest episode in a series of confrontations that stretched over a year.
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