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NEWS
November 15, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SHE CALLED THEM "gifts of love. " Mary Earline Davis delighted in making small craft items, such as a cross, a bank, a calendar or a poem of encouraging words, that she would place in baskets for distribution to family, friends and church members. That was the kind of woman Earline was: always considerate, always loving and willing to lend a hand and always inspiring others. "Her main mission was to care for her family," said her granddaughter, Monika Davis. "My grandmother was very giving and willing to help her friends, family and neighbors whenever they were in need.
NEWS
September 21, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Sidney T. Yates, 84, a lawyer from Upper Makefield Township who worked with schools, local governments, and lending institutions, died Tuesday, Sept. 10, of congestive heart failure in Kintnersville. In 1956, Mr. Yates joined the law firm of William R. Stuckert in Newtown Borough and shortly afterward became managing partner of the renamed Stuckert & Yates. The firm has been in business for many years, with Mr. Yates at the helm for half a century. At various times, he was solicitor for the Newtown Borough Council, Upper Makefield School District, Newtown Township, Middletown Township, Centennial School District, Newtown Sewer Authority, Lower Southampton Sewer Authority, Bucks County Intermediate District, and Middle Bucks Area Vocational Technical School Authority.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a continuing outreach effort, the Delaware County Council will head for Marple Township to hold its next evening meeting, at 6 on March 27 at the municipal building, 227 S. Sproul Rd., Broomall. It will be a regular business meeting, but the council will also invite residents to give input during the public comment period. "It is our hope that these evening meetings will encourage our residents to become more involved with local government and in turn help us to communicate more directly with our residents," said Thomas McGarrigle, council chairman.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Jose Manuel Benito was detained and ordered deported, his young children went to LOVE Park in Philadelphia with their mother and made a wish on the fountain that Dad would come home. "It was all I could think of to do," Benito's partner, Blanca Bautista, said after his surprise release this week. Benito, 32, who has lived in the country for 13 years and has four children, 11 and younger, with Bautista, was arrested by immigration agents at his East Camden home in May. The investigators were looking for someone else when they knocked on his door, law enforcement sources say. But when they ran Benito's name, they saw he had been deported before - in 2004 on a return trip from visiting his widowed father in Puebla, Mexico - and arrested him. In the four months that followed, Bautista, overcoming her own fears as an undocumented immigrant, did much more to keep her family together than drop a coin in a fountain.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE FIRST BLOW came from behind. Micheal Allen had been relaxing in bed, writing in her journal, when her head exploded with pain. The hits hammered on, breaking her nose and ripping open her cheek. Allen rolled out of bed to face her attacker, a fellow resident of the Kintock Center, the halfway house in North Philadelphia where both women were sent last spring as parole violators. "I could see blood pouring down my face and my body just went weak," Allen said recently, recalling the May 16 attack.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
NOT IN MY back yard. That sentiment is felt by some folks who live in the brick rowhouses across Haverford Avenue from Philadelphia's brand new, $110 million youth-detention center. The city didn't fully consult with them before deciding to build in the Mill Creek community, some say, and now there is uncertainty over how property values, taxes and traffic will be impacted. Some residents are working with the city to make the best of the situation. City bigwigs cut the ribbon for the Philadelphia Juvenile Justice Services Center two weeks ago. The first teenage defendants are expected to move in from the old Youth Study Center in January.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
After he graduated from the youth program at his Hindu temple, Sapan Modi said, he was unsure how to keep contributing to South Jersey's Indian community. On Sunday - in a ballroom buzzing with a success 25 years in the making - he may have found his answer. "This might be the next phase where people can give back," Modi, 27, said as he and 600 others dedicated the Indian Cultural Center in Evesham Township. "I can't contribute $20,000. But I can contribute my time. " South Jersey's burgeoning Indian community has been working to build the center for more than two decades.
NEWS
June 4, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three recent graduates of the Curtis Institute of Music will become inaugural fellows of ArtistYear, a pilot program designed to bring a year-long AmeriCorps-like community service opportunity to the world of the arts in Philadelphia. The program, launched as part of the Aspen Institute's Franklin Project, which aims to create one million service-year positions by 2023, will kick off in the 2014-15 academic year. Former U.S. Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal, chair of the Franklin Project's Leadership Council, said the project aims to make community service a standard practice for all young Americans.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
For local artist James Burns, creating a mural depicting the emotions surrounding suicide hits close to home. "Suicide is not just about ending one person's suffering," Burns said. "What people don't realize is that it starts a whole chain reaction of sorrow for those who are left behind. " Burns, 37, is head artist on the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program's latest project, "Finding the Light Within," at 119 S. 31st St. The painter was denied the opportunity to know his grandfather because of his untimely death, and while working on the two-year project, he lost friends from graduate school and high school months apart.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nic Esposito is at once a romantic and a realist, and both inform his passions: farming, telling stories, and advocating for fresh, local food for all. Now, with Kensington Homestead , his second book and first attempt at nonfiction, Esposito, 32, is emerging as a literary voice for the wildly vibrant farm community in Philadelphia. His 14-essay collection chronicles the joys and frustrations of growing crops in uber-urban East Kensington, where the forces of gentrification press relentlessly through the swirl of entrenched poverty.
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