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NEWS
November 15, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SHE CALLED THEM "gifts of love. " Mary Earline Davis delighted in making small craft items, such as a cross, a bank, a calendar or a poem of encouraging words, that she would place in baskets for distribution to family, friends and church members. That was the kind of woman Earline was: always considerate, always loving and willing to lend a hand and always inspiring others. "Her main mission was to care for her family," said her granddaughter, Monika Davis. "My grandmother was very giving and willing to help her friends, family and neighbors whenever they were in need.
NEWS
September 21, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Sidney T. Yates, 84, a lawyer from Upper Makefield Township who worked with schools, local governments, and lending institutions, died Tuesday, Sept. 10, of congestive heart failure in Kintnersville. In 1956, Mr. Yates joined the law firm of William R. Stuckert in Newtown Borough and shortly afterward became managing partner of the renamed Stuckert & Yates. The firm has been in business for many years, with Mr. Yates at the helm for half a century. At various times, he was solicitor for the Newtown Borough Council, Upper Makefield School District, Newtown Township, Middletown Township, Centennial School District, Newtown Sewer Authority, Lower Southampton Sewer Authority, Bucks County Intermediate District, and Middle Bucks Area Vocational Technical School Authority.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a continuing outreach effort, the Delaware County Council will head for Marple Township to hold its next evening meeting, at 6 on March 27 at the municipal building, 227 S. Sproul Rd., Broomall. It will be a regular business meeting, but the council will also invite residents to give input during the public comment period. "It is our hope that these evening meetings will encourage our residents to become more involved with local government and in turn help us to communicate more directly with our residents," said Thomas McGarrigle, council chairman.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Jose Manuel Benito was detained and ordered deported, his young children went to LOVE Park in Philadelphia with their mother and made a wish on the fountain that Dad would come home. "It was all I could think of to do," Benito's partner, Blanca Bautista, said after his surprise release this week. Benito, 32, who has lived in the country for 13 years and has four children, 11 and younger, with Bautista, was arrested by immigration agents at his East Camden home in May. The investigators were looking for someone else when they knocked on his door, law enforcement sources say. But when they ran Benito's name, they saw he had been deported before - in 2004 on a return trip from visiting his widowed father in Puebla, Mexico - and arrested him. In the four months that followed, Bautista, overcoming her own fears as an undocumented immigrant, did much more to keep her family together than drop a coin in a fountain.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
NOT IN MY back yard. That sentiment is felt by some folks who live in the brick rowhouses across Haverford Avenue from Philadelphia's brand new, $110 million youth-detention center. The city didn't fully consult with them before deciding to build in the Mill Creek community, some say, and now there is uncertainty over how property values, taxes and traffic will be impacted. Some residents are working with the city to make the best of the situation. City bigwigs cut the ribbon for the Philadelphia Juvenile Justice Services Center two weeks ago. The first teenage defendants are expected to move in from the old Youth Study Center in January.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
Sister Kimberly Kessler has learned the solitary truth about the path she has chosen. She has prayed, studied, and served with the Sisters of the Holy Redeemer in Huntingdon Valley for eight years, with two more to go before taking her final vows. She already has outlasted three other aspirants, who gave up along the way. At age 39 one of the youngest nuns in a community of just 18, she sometimes worries about a future with a dwindling group of sisters to carry on the mission. In Kessler, the predicament of religious life crystallizes.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
WE JUST MIGHT save the city's oldest African-American bookstore. If things keep going the way they have since my column about Hakim's Bookstore - family-owned-and-operated since 1959 - the struggling black literary institution just may be around for another half-century. The response has been overwhelming, said owner Yvonne Blake. People have called and written from all over with memories about the bookstore that was started by Blake's late father, Dawud Hakim. Many, including Tariq "Black Thought" Trotter of the Roots, have shared the story on social media and put out a plea for support under #savehakims.
NEWS
February 10, 2016
AFTER HEARING a bit more community opposition than was scheduled Monday afternoon, the Temple University board of trustees voted unanimously to move forward with a controversial plan to build a $126 million, 35,000-seat stadium and retail complex on North Broad Street. The approval, Temple president Neil Theobald explained, was just for $1 million in "preliminary approval" for design plans, which then would be brought to the community. Not involving the community earlier proved to be a mistake.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
As Mayor Kenney's official black SUV rolled up, high-pitched cheers erupted from the steps to Southwest Philadelphia's Penrose School and the rat-tat-tat of the drum line started inside the building. "He's here! He's here!" Kenney shook hands with the second-grade welcoming party, standing in a line with "Welcome, Mayor Kenney" signs and shy smiles. "Thank you for having me," he said. "Should we go inside?" The mayor has said he will visit one school a week as a nod to his focus on education and two big promises: making pre-K education available to every child in Philadelphia, and putting in place "community schools" - campuses that offer residents access to health, counseling and social services, and community development programs.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
On warm days, Sylvester "Button" Combs could often be found sitting on a wooden bench on Swedesboro's Kings Highway. During cold weather, he would find shelter in a local Christian thrift store and pantry, where he was greeted regularly by staff and volunteers with a cup of coffee and doughnuts or a pack of his beloved chicken nuggets from Wawa. Known by many simply by his nickname, the homeless man was a fixture for years in the tiny rural Gloucester County community that lovingly tended to him. Residents and business owners regularly gave Combs meals and clothing, cigarettes, and sometimes a warm place to stay.
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