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NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do sick people have a right to be treated in their own community? Do residents have a right to say who gets care nearby? The questions have a familiar ring in Northeast Philadelphia, where residents have repeatedly opposed new methadone maintenance clinics, forcing hundreds of their neighbors to travel across the city for care. A new chapter in the debate will open Wednesday, when State Rep. Kevin J. Boyle (D., Phila.) holds a hearing in Mayfair on a bill that would give communities more power over the approval process.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SHE CALLED THEM "gifts of love. " Mary Earline Davis delighted in making small craft items, such as a cross, a bank, a calendar or a poem of encouraging words, that she would place in baskets for distribution to family, friends and church members. That was the kind of woman Earline was: always considerate, always loving and willing to lend a hand and always inspiring others. "Her main mission was to care for her family," said her granddaughter, Monika Davis. "My grandmother was very giving and willing to help her friends, family and neighbors whenever they were in need.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a continuing outreach effort, the Delaware County Council will head for Marple Township to hold its next evening meeting, at 6 on March 27 at the municipal building, 227 S. Sproul Rd., Broomall. It will be a regular business meeting, but the council will also invite residents to give input during the public comment period. "It is our hope that these evening meetings will encourage our residents to become more involved with local government and in turn help us to communicate more directly with our residents," said Thomas McGarrigle, council chairman.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Jose Manuel Benito was detained and ordered deported, his young children went to LOVE Park in Philadelphia with their mother and made a wish on the fountain that Dad would come home. "It was all I could think of to do," Benito's partner, Blanca Bautista, said after his surprise release this week. Benito, 32, who has lived in the country for 13 years and has four children, 11 and younger, with Bautista, was arrested by immigration agents at his East Camden home in May. The investigators were looking for someone else when they knocked on his door, law enforcement sources say. But when they ran Benito's name, they saw he had been deported before - in 2004 on a return trip from visiting his widowed father in Puebla, Mexico - and arrested him. In the four months that followed, Bautista, overcoming her own fears as an undocumented immigrant, did much more to keep her family together than drop a coin in a fountain.
NEWS
July 5, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Power outages could be a worry of the past for businesses in one Chester County township if a proposed solar-powered electrical grid becomes reality. Developers want to build one of the region's first solar microgrids on what was once a problem-plagued landfill in East Whiteland Township. The $15 million system would have more than 11,000 solar panels spanning 30 acres, and produce six to seven megawatts of power specifically for local businesses. A microgrid can connect to an area's main electrical grid, or it can function autonomously, continuing to run during mass outages due, for example, to severe weather.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
For local artist James Burns, creating a mural depicting the emotions surrounding suicide hits close to home. "Suicide is not just about ending one person's suffering," Burns said. "What people don't realize is that it starts a whole chain reaction of sorrow for those who are left behind. " Burns, 37, is head artist on the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program's latest project, "Finding the Light Within," at 119 S. 31st St. The painter was denied the opportunity to know his grandfather because of his untimely death, and while working on the two-year project, he lost friends from graduate school and high school months apart.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
Sister Kimberly Kessler has learned the solitary truth about the path she has chosen. She has prayed, studied, and served with the Sisters of the Holy Redeemer in Huntingdon Valley for eight years, with two more to go before taking her final vows. She already has outlasted three other aspirants, who gave up along the way. At age 39 one of the youngest nuns in a community of just 18, she sometimes worries about a future with a dwindling group of sisters to carry on the mission. In Kessler, the predicament of religious life crystallizes.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | Morgan Zalot
Chillin' Wit' is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. AS LATE-afternoon sun breaks through the clouds and residents enjoy a warm Sunday afternoon on their patios on Tudor Street off Frankford Avenue, Mayfair Town Watch President Milt Martelack kicks back with Vice President Anna Stacey as her husband prepares a barbecued feast on his double grill. "If you go through the neighborhood, you'll see everyone else doing the same thing," Martelack says with a grin.
NEWS
February 10, 2016
AFTER HEARING a bit more community opposition than was scheduled Monday afternoon, the Temple University board of trustees voted unanimously to move forward with a controversial plan to build a $126 million, 35,000-seat stadium and retail complex on North Broad Street. The approval, Temple president Neil Theobald explained, was just for $1 million in "preliminary approval" for design plans, which then would be brought to the community. Not involving the community earlier proved to be a mistake.
NEWS
September 16, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
For local artist James Burns, creating a mural depicting the emotions surrounding suicide hits close to home. "Suicide is not just about ending one person's suffering," Burns said. "What people don't realize is that it starts a whole chain reaction of sorrow for those who are left behind. " Burns, 37, is head artist on the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program's latest project, "Finding the Light Within," at 119 S. 31st St. The painter was denied the opportunity to know his grandfather because of his untimely death, and while working on the two-year project, he lost friends from graduate school and high school months apart.
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