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NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a continuing outreach effort, the Delaware County Council will head for Marple Township to hold its next evening meeting, at 6 on March 27 at the municipal building, 227 S. Sproul Rd., Broomall. It will be a regular business meeting, but the council will also invite residents to give input during the public comment period. "It is our hope that these evening meetings will encourage our residents to become more involved with local government and in turn help us to communicate more directly with our residents," said Thomas McGarrigle, council chairman.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Jose Manuel Benito was detained and ordered deported, his young children went to LOVE Park in Philadelphia with their mother and made a wish on the fountain that Dad would come home. "It was all I could think of to do," Benito's partner, Blanca Bautista, said after his surprise release this week. Benito, 32, who has lived in the country for 13 years and has four children, 11 and younger, with Bautista, was arrested by immigration agents at his East Camden home in May. The investigators were looking for someone else when they knocked on his door, law enforcement sources say. But when they ran Benito's name, they saw he had been deported before - in 2004 on a return trip from visiting his widowed father in Puebla, Mexico - and arrested him. In the four months that followed, Bautista, overcoming her own fears as an undocumented immigrant, did much more to keep her family together than drop a coin in a fountain.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nic Esposito is at once a romantic and a realist, and both inform his passions: farming, telling stories, and advocating for fresh, local food for all. Now, with Kensington Homestead , his second book and first attempt at nonfiction, Esposito, 32, is emerging as a literary voice for the wildly vibrant farm community in Philadelphia. His 14-essay collection chronicles the joys and frustrations of growing crops in uber-urban East Kensington, where the forces of gentrification press relentlessly through the swirl of entrenched poverty.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
NOT IN MY back yard. That sentiment is felt by some folks who live in the brick rowhouses across Haverford Avenue from Philadelphia's brand new, $110 million youth-detention center. The city didn't fully consult with them before deciding to build in the Mill Creek community, some say, and now there is uncertainty over how property values, taxes and traffic will be impacted. Some residents are working with the city to make the best of the situation. City bigwigs cut the ribbon for the Philadelphia Juvenile Justice Services Center two weeks ago. The first teenage defendants are expected to move in from the old Youth Study Center in January.
NEWS
June 4, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three recent graduates of the Curtis Institute of Music will become inaugural fellows of ArtistYear, a pilot program designed to bring a year-long AmeriCorps-like community service opportunity to the world of the arts in Philadelphia. The program, launched as part of the Aspen Institute's Franklin Project, which aims to create one million service-year positions by 2023, will kick off in the 2014-15 academic year. Former U.S. Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal, chair of the Franklin Project's Leadership Council, said the project aims to make community service a standard practice for all young Americans.
REAL_ESTATE
December 1, 2013 | By Alison Burdo, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the span of 30 minutes most afternoons in the DiFabio household, Carlie, 18; Sophia, 9; Madelena, 7; and Ariella, 6, discard their book bags, remove their coats, and kick off their shoes as they return from school. But gear that might easily become confused - such as school supplies belonging to the kindergartner and the second grader - seldom is, thanks to a "locker room" in the DiFabios' home in Harrison Township, Gloucester County. "It minimizes the chaos of having to get four kids out the door in the morning," said Alicia DiFabio.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 50 people - including religious leaders, political officials, and community members - gathered in Yardley on Friday afternoon to denounce an anti-Semitic slur apparently spray-painted onto a family's garage door this week. Organized by State Rep. Steve Santarsiero (D., Bucks), the event featured speeches from him and Lower Makefield Township Supervisor Jeff Benedetto as well as two rabbis, a nun, a Presbyterian pastor, a representative from a local Islamic group, and other community members.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
For local artist James Burns, creating a mural depicting the emotions surrounding suicide hits close to home. "Suicide is not just about ending one person's suffering," Burns said. "What people don't realize is that it starts a whole chain reaction of sorrow for those who are left behind. " Burns, 37, is head artist on the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program's latest project, "Finding the Light Within," at 119 S. 31st St. The painter was denied the opportunity to know his grandfather because of his untimely death, and while working on the two-year project, he lost friends from graduate school and high school months apart.
NEWS
December 31, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
CHERRY HILL Joyce Alexander Walker, 60, the first African American elected to the Cherry Hill Township Council, died Saturday, Dec. 28, after battling cancer, according to local officials. Even before her historic election in 1997, Mrs. Walker displayed her dedication to her community, they said. "She was a citizen in every sense of the word," said Eric Kipnis, who befriended Mrs. Walker when both worked on President Obama's 2008 campaign. He called her "a fighter for all the right reasons.
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | BY SHIRA GOODMAN & NICHOLAS RAMSEY
ON AUG. 1, just before 10 p.m. on Etting Street near Dickinson, in Grays Ferry, neighbors filled the street enjoying the mild summer evening. Three-year-old Tynirah Borum sat on a porch getting her hair braided. Two young men from the neighborhood arrived on a bicycle, began arguing and with complete disregard for life, fired off several rounds from a handgun. Tragically, they shot four people, one of whom was Tynirah. Shot through the left side of her chest, she died not long after.
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