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NEWS
March 10, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
Parishioners of St. Martin de Porres Catholic Church mourned slain Philadelphia Police Officer Robert Wilson III on Sunday, embraced his grieving fellow officers, and collected money to help support his two young sons. Wilson, 30, was killed Thursday in a GameStop holdup just two blocks down the street from the gray stone church that serves the Swampoodle neighborhood of North Philadelphia. The death of the officer - who was buying a video game for his 9-year-old son, Quahmier, as a reward for good grades - rocked the region.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SHE CALLED THEM "gifts of love. " Mary Earline Davis delighted in making small craft items, such as a cross, a bank, a calendar or a poem of encouraging words, that she would place in baskets for distribution to family, friends and church members. That was the kind of woman Earline was: always considerate, always loving and willing to lend a hand and always inspiring others. "Her main mission was to care for her family," said her granddaughter, Monika Davis. "My grandmother was very giving and willing to help her friends, family and neighbors whenever they were in need.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a continuing outreach effort, the Delaware County Council will head for Marple Township to hold its next evening meeting, at 6 on March 27 at the municipal building, 227 S. Sproul Rd., Broomall. It will be a regular business meeting, but the council will also invite residents to give input during the public comment period. "It is our hope that these evening meetings will encourage our residents to become more involved with local government and in turn help us to communicate more directly with our residents," said Thomas McGarrigle, council chairman.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Jose Manuel Benito was detained and ordered deported, his young children went to LOVE Park in Philadelphia with their mother and made a wish on the fountain that Dad would come home. "It was all I could think of to do," Benito's partner, Blanca Bautista, said after his surprise release this week. Benito, 32, who has lived in the country for 13 years and has four children, 11 and younger, with Bautista, was arrested by immigration agents at his East Camden home in May. The investigators were looking for someone else when they knocked on his door, law enforcement sources say. But when they ran Benito's name, they saw he had been deported before - in 2004 on a return trip from visiting his widowed father in Puebla, Mexico - and arrested him. In the four months that followed, Bautista, overcoming her own fears as an undocumented immigrant, did much more to keep her family together than drop a coin in a fountain.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
On warm days, Sylvester "Button" Combs could often be found sitting on a wooden bench on Swedesboro's Kings Highway. During cold weather, he would find shelter in a local Christian thrift store and pantry, where he was greeted regularly by staff and volunteers with a cup of coffee and doughnuts or a pack of his beloved chicken nuggets from Wawa. Known by many simply by his nickname, the homeless man was a fixture for years in the tiny rural Gloucester County community that lovingly tended to him. Residents and business owners regularly gave Combs meals and clothing, cigarettes, and sometimes a warm place to stay.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
For local artist James Burns, creating a mural depicting the emotions surrounding suicide hits close to home. "Suicide is not just about ending one person's suffering," Burns said. "What people don't realize is that it starts a whole chain reaction of sorrow for those who are left behind. " Burns, 37, is head artist on the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program's latest project, "Finding the Light Within," at 119 S. 31st St. The painter was denied the opportunity to know his grandfather because of his untimely death, and while working on the two-year project, he lost friends from graduate school and high school months apart.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE FIRST BLOW came from behind. Micheal Allen had been relaxing in bed, writing in her journal, when her head exploded with pain. The hits hammered on, breaking her nose and ripping open her cheek. Allen rolled out of bed to face her attacker, a fellow resident of the Kintock Center, the halfway house in North Philadelphia where both women were sent last spring as parole violators. "I could see blood pouring down my face and my body just went weak," Allen said recently, recalling the May 16 attack.
NEWS
March 26, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
Sister Kimberly Kessler has learned the solitary truth about the path she has chosen. She has prayed, studied, and served with the Sisters of the Holy Redeemer in Huntingdon Valley for eight years, with two more to go before taking her final vows. She already has outlasted three other aspirants, who gave up along the way. At age 39 one of the youngest nuns in a community of just 18, she sometimes worries about a future with a dwindling group of sisters to carry on the mission. In Kessler, the predicament of religious life crystallizes.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
NOT IN MY back yard. That sentiment is felt by some folks who live in the brick rowhouses across Haverford Avenue from Philadelphia's brand new, $110 million youth-detention center. The city didn't fully consult with them before deciding to build in the Mill Creek community, some say, and now there is uncertainty over how property values, taxes and traffic will be impacted. Some residents are working with the city to make the best of the situation. City bigwigs cut the ribbon for the Philadelphia Juvenile Justice Services Center two weeks ago. The first teenage defendants are expected to move in from the old Youth Study Center in January.
REAL_ESTATE
December 1, 2013 | By Alison Burdo, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the span of 30 minutes most afternoons in the DiFabio household, Carlie, 18; Sophia, 9; Madelena, 7; and Ariella, 6, discard their book bags, remove their coats, and kick off their shoes as they return from school. But gear that might easily become confused - such as school supplies belonging to the kindergartner and the second grader - seldom is, thanks to a "locker room" in the DiFabios' home in Harrison Township, Gloucester County. "It minimizes the chaos of having to get four kids out the door in the morning," said Alicia DiFabio.
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