CollectionsCommunity
IN THE NEWS

Community

NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do sick people have a right to be treated in their own community? Do residents have a right to say who gets care nearby? The questions have a familiar ring in Northeast Philadelphia, where residents have repeatedly opposed new methadone maintenance clinics, forcing hundreds of their neighbors to travel across the city for care. A new chapter in the debate will open Wednesday, when State Rep. Kevin J. Boyle (D., Phila.) holds a hearing in Mayfair on a bill that would give communities more power over the approval process.
NEWS
November 15, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SHE CALLED THEM "gifts of love. " Mary Earline Davis delighted in making small craft items, such as a cross, a bank, a calendar or a poem of encouraging words, that she would place in baskets for distribution to family, friends and church members. That was the kind of woman Earline was: always considerate, always loving and willing to lend a hand and always inspiring others. "Her main mission was to care for her family," said her granddaughter, Monika Davis. "My grandmother was very giving and willing to help her friends, family and neighbors whenever they were in need.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a continuing outreach effort, the Delaware County Council will head for Marple Township to hold its next evening meeting, at 6 on March 27 at the municipal building, 227 S. Sproul Rd., Broomall. It will be a regular business meeting, but the council will also invite residents to give input during the public comment period. "It is our hope that these evening meetings will encourage our residents to become more involved with local government and in turn help us to communicate more directly with our residents," said Thomas McGarrigle, council chairman.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Jose Manuel Benito was detained and ordered deported, his young children went to LOVE Park in Philadelphia with their mother and made a wish on the fountain that Dad would come home. "It was all I could think of to do," Benito's partner, Blanca Bautista, said after his surprise release this week. Benito, 32, who has lived in the country for 13 years and has four children, 11 and younger, with Bautista, was arrested by immigration agents at his East Camden home in May. The investigators were looking for someone else when they knocked on his door, law enforcement sources say. But when they ran Benito's name, they saw he had been deported before - in 2004 on a return trip from visiting his widowed father in Puebla, Mexico - and arrested him. In the four months that followed, Bautista, overcoming her own fears as an undocumented immigrant, did much more to keep her family together than drop a coin in a fountain.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
WE JUST MIGHT save the city's oldest African-American bookstore. If things keep going the way they have since my column about Hakim's Bookstore - family-owned-and-operated since 1959 - the struggling black literary institution just may be around for another half-century. The response has been overwhelming, said owner Yvonne Blake. People have called and written from all over with memories about the bookstore that was started by Blake's late father, Dawud Hakim. Many, including Tariq "Black Thought" Trotter of the Roots, have shared the story on social media and put out a plea for support under #savehakims.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
NOT IN MY back yard. That sentiment is felt by some folks who live in the brick rowhouses across Haverford Avenue from Philadelphia's brand new, $110 million youth-detention center. The city didn't fully consult with them before deciding to build in the Mill Creek community, some say, and now there is uncertainty over how property values, taxes and traffic will be impacted. Some residents are working with the city to make the best of the situation. City bigwigs cut the ribbon for the Philadelphia Juvenile Justice Services Center two weeks ago. The first teenage defendants are expected to move in from the old Youth Study Center in January.
NEWS
December 9, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
By 2005, when Brett Bonfield and Beth Filla bought a big old house near Knight Park, Collingswood's evolution from sleepy Camden County suburb to dynamic regional destination had begun. So they rolled up their sleeves and helped move it along. "Instantly, we loved living here," says Filla, owner and director of Yogawood, the popular yoga studio downtown. "Collingswood has become such a cool hub," she adds. "And it keeps getting cooler and cooler. " Bonfield, since 2008 the director of the Collingswood Library, says the borough "has been a transformative place.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | Morgan Zalot
Chillin' Wit' is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. AS LATE-afternoon sun breaks through the clouds and residents enjoy a warm Sunday afternoon on their patios on Tudor Street off Frankford Avenue, Mayfair Town Watch President Milt Martelack kicks back with Vice President Anna Stacey as her husband prepares a barbecued feast on his double grill. "If you go through the neighborhood, you'll see everyone else doing the same thing," Martelack says with a grin.
NEWS
September 16, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
For local artist James Burns, creating a mural depicting the emotions surrounding suicide hits close to home. "Suicide is not just about ending one person's suffering," Burns said. "What people don't realize is that it starts a whole chain reaction of sorrow for those who are left behind. " Burns, 37, is head artist on the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program's latest project, "Finding the Light Within," at 119 S. 31st St. The painter was denied the opportunity to know his grandfather because of his untimely death, and while working on the two-year project, he lost friends from graduate school and high school months apart.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | BY JULIA TERRUSO, Staff Writer
AS MAYOR KENNEY'S official black SUV rolled up, high-pitched cheers erupted from the steps to Southwest Philadelphia's Penrose School and the rat-tat-tat of the drum line started inside the building. "He's here! He's here!" Kenney shook hands with the second-grade welcoming party, standing in a line with "Welcome, Mayor Kenney" signs and shy smiles. "Thank you for having me," he said. "Should we go inside?" The mayor has said he will visit one school a week as a nod to his focus on education and two big promises: making pre-K education available to every child in Philadelphia, and putting in place "community schools" - campuses that offer residents access to health, counseling and social services, and community development programs.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|