CollectionsCommunity
IN THE NEWS

Community

NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Amy Teibel, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu waded Monday into one of Israel's deepest political morasses, urging lawmakers to find a "just" replacement for a law that has exempted tens of thousands of ultra-Orthodox Jews from compulsory military service. The Israeli leader appeared before a parliamentary committee charged with crafting a new draft law after the current system was deemed illegal by the country's Supreme Court. With a July 31 deadline looming, the committee must find a compromise palatable to both to secular and modern Orthodox religious parties, whose followers serve in the military, and to ultra-Orthodox coalition partners, who say their loyalists are serving the state by serving God. Netanyahu told the panel's first meeting that a more equitable sharing of the country's defense burden must be implemented gradually, and without pitting any one sector against another.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
For local artist James Burns, creating a mural depicting the emotions surrounding suicide hits close to home. "Suicide is not just about ending one person's suffering," Burns said. "What people don't realize is that it starts a whole chain reaction of sorrow for those who are left behind. " Burns, 37, is head artist on the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program's latest project, "Finding the Light Within," at 119 S. 31st St. The painter was denied the opportunity to know his grandfather because of his untimely death, and while working on the two-year project, he lost friends from graduate school and high school months apart.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2015 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nic Esposito is at once a romantic and a realist, and both inform his passions: farming, telling stories, and advocating for fresh, local food for all. Now, with Kensington Homestead , his second book and first attempt at nonfiction, Esposito, 32, is emerging as a literary voice for the wildly vibrant farm community in Philadelphia. His 14-essay collection chronicles the joys and frustrations of growing crops in uber-urban East Kensington, where the forces of gentrification press relentlessly through the swirl of entrenched poverty.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
As Mayor Kenney's official black SUV rolled up, high-pitched cheers erupted from the steps to Southwest Philadelphia's Penrose School and the rat-tat-tat of the drum line started inside the building. "He's here! He's here!" Kenney shook hands with the second-grade welcoming party, standing in a line with "Welcome, Mayor Kenney" signs and shy smiles. "Thank you for having me," he said. "Should we go inside?" The mayor has said he will visit one school a week as a nod to his focus on education and two big promises: making pre-K education available to every child in Philadelphia, and putting in place "community schools" - campuses that offer residents access to health, counseling and social services, and community development programs.
NEWS
June 2, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
WANT TO MEET people, make new friends - maybe even start a little romance in your life? Ruth Harvey had the secret: Get off your duff, get out and do things. Do things that you enjoy and get to know people who enjoy the same things. And they will introduce you to other people, and pretty soon you have a network. Bars and nightspots are OK if you like that sort of thing, but try burning off paint from the hull of a tall ship, as Ruth did back in the late '80s on the Gazela. "So while you're down there burning off paint, you're having a conversation with someone and you realize you have something in common," she said.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Phillip Lucas and Daily News Staff Writer
Jerry Buckley, former vice president of public affairs at Campbell's Soup, was named the CEO of the Pennsylvania SPCA after 16 years with the Camden-based company.   During his tenure, Buckley also served as chairman of the Campbell Soup Foundation, the company's 37-year-old community-enrichment organization, which has worked to address hunger and childhood obesity, among other issues.   SPCA officials cited Buckley's communications background as one of his strongest attributes, along with his experience in business and philanthropy.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
True Green Capital Management L.L.C. and CIT Group Inc. announced the closing of $35 million of financing for a 12.3-megawatt solar rooftop system to provide power for the privatized housing community at Joint Military Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Burlington County. United Communities L.L.C., the owner of the 2,104-unit community, estimated the 13.7 million kilowatt hours produced each year by the system will provide about 40 percent of the community's annual electricity needs. United Communities is owned by First Montgomery Group of Marlton.
NEWS
June 4, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three recent graduates of the Curtis Institute of Music will become inaugural fellows of ArtistYear, a pilot program designed to bring a year-long AmeriCorps-like community service opportunity to the world of the arts in Philadelphia. The program, launched as part of the Aspen Institute's Franklin Project, which aims to create one million service-year positions by 2023, will kick off in the 2014-15 academic year. Former U.S. Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal, chair of the Franklin Project's Leadership Council, said the project aims to make community service a standard practice for all young Americans.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THE Daily News already knows that Helen Ubiñas is influential. But it's nice to hear someone else say it, too. The People Paper columnist was recently named one of the Delaware Valley's Most Influential Latinos by Impacto Latin Newspaper, a local news magazine. Impacto created the award in 2005 to "recognize individuals who have made great contributions to the Delaware Valley's Latino community and the community at large," Napoleon Garcia, the magazine's publisher, said in a statement.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | For The Inquirer / JILL ANNA GREENBERG
Riding in a balloon. Eating barbecued chicken. Those were among the activities at the first Plymouth Day Saturday. The event was sponsored by the township's Parks and Recreation Department. It was designed to bring the community together and is planned to be held annually.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|