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NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
For local artist James Burns, creating a mural depicting the emotions surrounding suicide hits close to home. "Suicide is not just about ending one person's suffering," Burns said. "What people don't realize is that it starts a whole chain reaction of sorrow for those who are left behind. " Burns, 37, is head artist on the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program's latest project, "Finding the Light Within," at 119 S. 31st St. The painter was denied the opportunity to know his grandfather because of his untimely death, and while working on the two-year project, he lost friends from graduate school and high school months apart.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
On warm days, Sylvester "Button" Combs could often be found sitting on a wooden bench on Swedesboro's Kings Highway. During cold weather, he would find shelter in a local Christian thrift store and pantry, where he was greeted regularly by staff and volunteers with a cup of coffee and doughnuts or a pack of his beloved chicken nuggets from Wawa. Known by many simply by his nickname, the homeless man was a fixture for years in the tiny rural Gloucester County community that lovingly tended to him. Residents and business owners regularly gave Combs meals and clothing, cigarettes, and sometimes a warm place to stay.
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
WE JUST MIGHT save the city's oldest African-American bookstore. If things keep going the way they have since my column about Hakim's Bookstore - family-owned-and-operated since 1959 - the struggling black literary institution just may be around for another half-century. The response has been overwhelming, said owner Yvonne Blake. People have called and written from all over with memories about the bookstore that was started by Blake's late father, Dawud Hakim. Many, including Tariq "Black Thought" Trotter of the Roots, have shared the story on social media and put out a plea for support under #savehakims.
NEWS
December 17, 2015 | By Stephanie Farr, STAFF WRITER
"Muslims have feelings. " "REAL Muslims are peaceful" "All humans united against terrorism. " So read just a few of the signs that were carried, clutched and hung up this morning by dozens of Muslim men, women and children at the Masjid Al Madinah Mosque and Islamic Center, in Upper Darby Townshp. Muslim leaders from the center, on 69th Street near Walnut, stood shoulder-to-shoulder with Upper Darby police at a morning news conference to denounce ISIS and affirm their alliance with the police department and their status as American citizens.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
After he graduated from the youth program at his Hindu temple, Sapan Modi said, he was unsure how to keep contributing to South Jersey's Indian community. On Sunday - in a ballroom buzzing with a success 25 years in the making - he may have found his answer. "This might be the next phase where people can give back," Modi, 27, said as he and 600 others dedicated the Indian Cultural Center in Evesham Township. "I can't contribute $20,000. But I can contribute my time. " South Jersey's burgeoning Indian community has been working to build the center for more than two decades.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Amy Teibel, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu waded Monday into one of Israel's deepest political morasses, urging lawmakers to find a "just" replacement for a law that has exempted tens of thousands of ultra-Orthodox Jews from compulsory military service. The Israeli leader appeared before a parliamentary committee charged with crafting a new draft law after the current system was deemed illegal by the country's Supreme Court. With a July 31 deadline looming, the committee must find a compromise palatable to both to secular and modern Orthodox religious parties, whose followers serve in the military, and to ultra-Orthodox coalition partners, who say their loyalists are serving the state by serving God. Netanyahu told the panel's first meeting that a more equitable sharing of the country's defense burden must be implemented gradually, and without pitting any one sector against another.
NEWS
February 6, 2012
Edwige Danticat, 43, whose collection of essays, Create Dangerously, is the 2012 choice for One Book, One Philadelphia, is a literary lioness. Her novel, Breath, Eyes, Memory, an evocation of Haitian-immigrant experience, was selected for Oprah's Book Club in 1998. A decade later, the MacArthur Foundation graced her with a "genius" grant. Now in its 10th year, One Book, One Philadelphia is a project of the Mayor's Office and the Free Library of Philadelphia to promote literacy and community-building by encouraging the public to read and discuss the featured selection.
REAL_ESTATE
December 1, 2013 | By Alison Burdo, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the span of 30 minutes most afternoons in the DiFabio household, Carlie, 18; Sophia, 9; Madelena, 7; and Ariella, 6, discard their book bags, remove their coats, and kick off their shoes as they return from school. But gear that might easily become confused - such as school supplies belonging to the kindergartner and the second grader - seldom is, thanks to a "locker room" in the DiFabios' home in Harrison Township, Gloucester County. "It minimizes the chaos of having to get four kids out the door in the morning," said Alicia DiFabio.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE FIRST BLOW came from behind. Micheal Allen had been relaxing in bed, writing in her journal, when her head exploded with pain. The hits hammered on, breaking her nose and ripping open her cheek. Allen rolled out of bed to face her attacker, a fellow resident of the Kintock Center, the halfway house in North Philadelphia where both women were sent last spring as parole violators. "I could see blood pouring down my face and my body just went weak," Allen said recently, recalling the May 16 attack.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Phillip Lucas and Daily News Staff Writer
Jerry Buckley, former vice president of public affairs at Campbell's Soup, was named the CEO of the Pennsylvania SPCA after 16 years with the Camden-based company.   During his tenure, Buckley also served as chairman of the Campbell Soup Foundation, the company's 37-year-old community-enrichment organization, which has worked to address hunger and childhood obesity, among other issues.   SPCA officials cited Buckley's communications background as one of his strongest attributes, along with his experience in business and philanthropy.
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