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NEWS
February 15, 2016
ISSUE | TEMPLE STADIUM Don't disrupt neighborhood; stay at Linc It is outrageous that Temple plans to spend at least $126 million of other people's money to build a football stadium so its team can play there perhaps six times a year ("Temple moves forward with stadium plans," Tuesday). This from a university that cut seven varsity teams for financial reasons, hires 1,400 adjunct instructors, has had its state funding significantly reduced, and repeatedly increases tuition.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Amy Teibel, Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu waded Monday into one of Israel's deepest political morasses, urging lawmakers to find a "just" replacement for a law that has exempted tens of thousands of ultra-Orthodox Jews from compulsory military service. The Israeli leader appeared before a parliamentary committee charged with crafting a new draft law after the current system was deemed illegal by the country's Supreme Court. With a July 31 deadline looming, the committee must find a compromise palatable to both to secular and modern Orthodox religious parties, whose followers serve in the military, and to ultra-Orthodox coalition partners, who say their loyalists are serving the state by serving God. Netanyahu told the panel's first meeting that a more equitable sharing of the country's defense burden must be implemented gradually, and without pitting any one sector against another.
NEWS
December 9, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
By 2005, when Brett Bonfield and Beth Filla bought a big old house near Knight Park, Collingswood's evolution from sleepy Camden County suburb to dynamic regional destination had begun. So they rolled up their sleeves and helped move it along. "Instantly, we loved living here," says Filla, owner and director of Yogawood, the popular yoga studio downtown. "Collingswood has become such a cool hub," she adds. "And it keeps getting cooler and cooler. " Bonfield, since 2008 the director of the Collingswood Library, says the borough "has been a transformative place.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 50 people - including religious leaders, political officials, and community members - gathered in Yardley on Friday afternoon to denounce an anti-Semitic slur apparently spray-painted onto a family's garage door this week. Organized by State Rep. Steve Santarsiero (D., Bucks), the event featured speeches from him and Lower Makefield Township Supervisor Jeff Benedetto as well as two rabbis, a nun, a Presbyterian pastor, a representative from a local Islamic group, and other community members.
NEWS
October 7, 2015 | BY WILLIAM R. MILLER IV, For the Daily News
FIRST AND FOREMOST, Jerry Mondesire was like part of my family, one of my dearest friends for more than 40 years, and I can't begin to tell you how my friends and family are in utter shock at our loss. We knew that he had health challenges. I've been in Mexico since Friday, and I talked with him on Thursday before I left. In that discussion - our conversations always began with "How are you, how you feeling, man?" - Jerry was upbeat and filled with optimism about the needed transplant and the direction in which his health challenges were going.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | Morgan Zalot
Chillin' Wit' is a regular feature of the Daily News spotlighting a name in the news away from the job. AS LATE-afternoon sun breaks through the clouds and residents enjoy a warm Sunday afternoon on their patios on Tudor Street off Frankford Avenue, Mayfair Town Watch President Milt Martelack kicks back with Vice President Anna Stacey as her husband prepares a barbecued feast on his double grill. "If you go through the neighborhood, you'll see everyone else doing the same thing," Martelack says with a grin.
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | BY MARY SYDNOR, For the Daily News
THE ASIAN Arts Initiative, a community-based arts center in Chinatown, has always encouraged local residents' involvement. AAI's latest project, the Social Practice Lab, continued that practice by inviting artists to solicit input for neighborhood art projects from local residents. There's plenty of challenge in the stark, industrial areas on Chinatown's northern edges. Artist Ben Volta and Gayle Isa, executive director of Asian Arts Initiative, recently met with PECO, for instance, about the huge electrical substation between 11th and 12th streets near the old viaduct.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
For local artist James Burns, creating a mural depicting the emotions surrounding suicide hits close to home. "Suicide is not just about ending one person's suffering," Burns said. "What people don't realize is that it starts a whole chain reaction of sorrow for those who are left behind. " Burns, 37, is head artist on the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program's latest project, "Finding the Light Within," at 119 S. 31st St. The painter was denied the opportunity to know his grandfather because of his untimely death, and while working on the two-year project, he lost friends from graduate school and high school months apart.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IS CAMDEN a hopeless case? Britt Starghill didn't think so. As pastor of Kaighn Avenue Baptist Church, Britt wasn't only concerned with the souls of his parishioners, but also with the soul of the impoverished city around him. He was founder of the Nehemiah Project, a community development corporation devoted to fighting the blight afflicting the Gateway section of the city. He adopted the Whittier School, with the aim of seeing to it that its students got the best education to ensure their success in the world beyond the classroom.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE FIRST BLOW came from behind. Micheal Allen had been relaxing in bed, writing in her journal, when her head exploded with pain. The hits hammered on, breaking her nose and ripping open her cheek. Allen rolled out of bed to face her attacker, a fellow resident of the Kintock Center, the halfway house in North Philadelphia where both women were sent last spring as parole violators. "I could see blood pouring down my face and my body just went weak," Allen said recently, recalling the May 16 attack.
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