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NEWS
December 31, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
CHERRY HILL Joyce Alexander Walker, 60, the first African American elected to the Cherry Hill Township Council, died Saturday, Dec. 28, after battling cancer, according to local officials. Even before her historic election in 1997, Mrs. Walker displayed her dedication to her community, they said. "She was a citizen in every sense of the word," said Eric Kipnis, who befriended Mrs. Walker when both worked on President Obama's 2008 campaign. He called her "a fighter for all the right reasons.
SPORTS
March 21, 2012 | DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORT
WAKE FOREST sophomore point guard Tony Chennault, who played at Ss. Neumann-Goretti High, will transfer at the end of the spring semester, according to Demon Deacons coach Jeff Bzdelik. Chennault said he wanted to play closer to home. He started 31 games this season as Wake finished 13-18, 4-12 in the ACC. "This was a tough decision to leave my teammates at this point in my career, but at the end of the day I have to do what's best for me and my family," Chennault told the Wake Forest sports information office.
NEWS
June 1, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Main Line was once famous for fox hunts, but for the next 21/2 weeks, the biggest quarry in certain leafy stretches of Haverford and Ardmore will most definitely be a certain rare breed of Tiger. "You can't imagine how many people have said he's renting a house - more houses than George Washington slept in," said a laughing Sharon McNamara, president of the Merion Golf Manor Neighborhood Committee, when asked about the nonstop buzz about golfing icon Tiger Woods and his whereabouts in the run-up to the U.S. Open championship at Merion Golf Club from June 13 to 16. Rumored Tiger spottings are traded in whispers much as F. Scott Fitzgerald's characters gossiped about Jay Gatsby's possible ties to the Kaiser.
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Rev. Derick Scudder
I'D LIKE TO THANK the Daily News for its recent series bringing attention to the issue of illegal ATVs and dirt bikes, which have replaced graffiti as the major blight of lower-income neighborhoods. Why spend the time and money tagging up a wall? You don't know who will see it, and it'll probably get removed in a few days anyway. But roaring down the street, scaring children and setting off car alarms on an ATV or dirt bike gives immediate recognition. Plus, it has the added assurance that you won't get caught.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
No to Hagel The last Republican-in-name-only brought in by a Democratic president to run the Pentagon and to give the chief bipartisan cover to starve the military (every Democrat's dream) was Bill Cohen, who served under Bill Clinton ("New team for security challenges," Tuesday). After four years under their feckless leadership and general lack of interest, our nation suffered the most deadly attack since Pearl Harbor. In fairness to Clinton, there was a relative calm in the world then, and Cohen was smart enough not to harbor oafish points of view, unlike Chuck Hagel, President Obama's nominee for defense secretary.
NEWS
June 2, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
WANT TO MEET people, make new friends - maybe even start a little romance in your life? Ruth Harvey had the secret: Get off your duff, get out and do things. Do things that you enjoy and get to know people who enjoy the same things. And they will introduce you to other people, and pretty soon you have a network. Bars and nightspots are OK if you like that sort of thing, but try burning off paint from the hull of a tall ship, as Ruth did back in the late '80s on the Gazela. "So while you're down there burning off paint, you're having a conversation with someone and you realize you have something in common," she said.
SPORTS
June 2, 1999 | By Josh Egerman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Harran Williams' rise to the top of New Jersey's exclusive hurdling community has been nearly as fast as Williams himself. When it seemed that few outside the Camden city limits knew the password to get into the club for hurdling's elite, the Delran senior busted down the door. Beginning with the South Jersey Track and Field Carnival on April 30, Williams has shaved four seconds off his best time in the 400-meter intermediate hurdles, and at last weekend's state Group 2 meet in South Plainfield, he avenged losses from the sectional meet to win state titles in the 110 high hurdles (14.27 seconds)
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Ben Finley, and Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writers
A troubled patient opened fire on a caseworker and psychiatrist in a small office at a unit of Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Delaware County on Thursday afternoon, police said, leading the doctor to draw his own weapon and shoot the assailant. The confrontation left the caseworker, 53-year-old Theresa Hunt, dead and the 52-year-old psychiatrist, a veteran doctor at the hospital whom sources identified as Lee Silverman, with a graze wound to the head. The patient, Richard Plotts, was in critical condition Thursday night from three gunshot wounds.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Murray Shusterman began practicing law in 1936, when Franklin D. Roosevelt was in the White House - and he hasn't stopped working since. Today, at age 101, he travels each day from his Bala Cynwyd home to his Center City office at Fox Rothschild, where his work has focused on corporate and real estate law. "What? Retire? Sit in a rocking chair and wait to die?" Shusterman said in an interview. "All my life I've been active. " That's not changing as his 102d birthday nears.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | By Margie Fishman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Frank Nofer, 71, of Spring Mill, a celebrated graphic artist and watercolorist who designed a Philadelphia logo for the American Bicentennial, died Thursday at Keystone House in Wyndmoor. His representational watercolors are included in prominent private and corporate collections. In 1995, the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College honored him with a one-man retrospective exhibition. For 25 years, Mr. Nofer operated a graphic-design studio in the Old City section of Philadelphia, where he did advertising for pharmaceutical companies and amassed many awards.
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