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July 17, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
South Jersey, with its relative dearth of four-year colleges, appears to have adopted a new venue for delivering bachelor's degrees to residents: community colleges. Following a national trend, professors from universities including Rowan and Rutgers-Camden are increasingly traveling to teach on the county campuses, offering bachelor's programs as part of new partnerships with the two-year schools. After completing an associate's degree, community college students can transfer to a four-year program and complete a university bachelor's degree right where they are. "Some of it has to do with capacity.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | BY DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writer segelbd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5917
TO AFRICAN grocery store owner Musa Kromah, who immigrated to the United States 11 years ago to escape civil war in his native Liberia, Philadelphia is "well-known" back in his home country. In fact, he said, "all Liberians" have family members in the city. Greater Philadelphia has the largest Liberian population of any U.S. metro area, according to a November 2008 report from the Brookings Institute think tank. Recent U.S. Census Bureau five-year estimates put the number of people of Liberian ancestry in Philadelphia at 3,769, though community leaders estimate that the numbers are over 5,000.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
A NONPROFIT KNOWN as the William Penn Development Coalition filed an injunction Friday with the state Supreme Court to stop the school district's sale of William Penn High School to Temple University. The community coalition - composed of neighborhood groups in North Philadelphia's Yorktown section, area business leaders, William Penn alums and educators - claims the School Reform Commission blocked its attempts to buy the high school, on Broad Street near Master. The filing states that the coalition began the process of purchasing the property in the fall for "community use including a mixed use of retail and a training academy in the high demand fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edwin J. Poplawski, 88, of Springfield, Delaware County, a banker, World War II veteran, and community organizer, died Wednesday, July 9, of lung cancer at Vitas Hospice at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital. Mr. Poplawski worked for 23 years at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia and another 23 years at the First Pennsylvania Bank before retiring as an assistant vice president in 1989. As part of his job, Mr. Poplawski created and launched technical designs in the areas of computer automation, advanced security functions, and data integrity and controls.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The day Seabrook House opened in 1974, a young woman walked through the door with two little boys. She wanted to know whether the brand-new alcoholism and addiction treatment center in rural Cumberland County, N.J., could help her husband. Seabrook cofounder Margaret "Peg" Diehl gave the visitor the answer she'd learned by heart in the 1960s, when she was struggling to raise her sons while her husband's drinking threatened to destroy their lives - and his. The woman's husband could be offered treatment, "but her family needed help, too," Peg recalls.
SPORTS
July 16, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
For a generation of kids who grew up in Media, Chris Derrick's voice was the first they usually heard when they walked into the Media Youth Center. Before tryouts for the hoops league each year, Derrick would show the younger boys and girls the proper technique for shooting a basketball. He always seemed to know all their names. That's why when Penncrest High won the PIAA state boys' lacrosse title last month, Derrick was the link for many people in the community. They may not have known any Penncrest players, but they sure knew the assistant coach with the wavy hair and the knowing way about him, the guy who still knew their names if they encountered him walking down State Street.
NEWS
July 11, 2014
D AVID MARTIN, 30, of Blue Bell, is founder and CEO of PetCoach, a startup with a mobile app - currently in stealth mode - that gives pet owners direct advice on their smartphones from veterinarians and certified pet experts. The startup expects to publicly launch next month. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for PetCoach? A: When we got accepted into DreamIt Ventures accelerator [in Austin, Texas] last winter, they suggested we make PetCoach a place to get expert pet advice in real time.
NEWS
July 10, 2014
AS THE DETAILS of the Fire Department's response to Saturday's deadly fire on Gesner Street continue to unfold, there remains one reason to applaud the community protest over the deaths of four children early Saturday: The death of a child goes against nature, and a visceral and passionate outrage is natural. Three 4-year-olds - Maria and Marialla Bowah and Patrick Sanyeah - and 1-month-old Taj Jacque were victims of the Southwest Philadelphia blaze, and whatever the cause, these deaths are heartbreaking.
NEWS
July 4, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
It might have been any social function: a buffet table, a bar, and the buzz of conversation about theater, about books, about kids. But this was no typical affair - although it's been going on for generations. The Annual Fellowship Dinner for Two Congregations, as it is simply named, has for almost 70 years brought together members of Philadelphia's Christ Church and Congregation Mikveh Israel, two institutions steeped in American colonial history, and intertwined with each other for just as long.
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The report released Monday by Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane into the three-year investigation of child sex-abuser Jerry Sandusky did little to change opinions of a Pennsylvania State University community still deeply divided over the scandal. Those who believe mistakes were made in the investigation, including delays by investigators under Gov. Corbett when he was attorney general, continue to believe so, and contend that they see such evidence in the report. Those who think Corbett and his successors did right by taking time to build a strong case without political motive say the report only buttresses their views.
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