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NEWS
February 25, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
Maya Young had a distinctive birthmark: One side of her face was light and the other dark, with a line down the middle separating the brown tones. "She looked like chocolate and caramel," said Anthony Harper, a longtime friend and former roommate of the 25-year-old transgender woman. He used to call her "Twix," like the candy bar. "She was sweet, like candy," he said. On Tuesday, Philadelphia police confirmed that Young had been stabbed to death late Saturday in the city's Frankford section.
NEWS
February 22, 2016
A New York City high school senior is giving Gloucester City residents a chance to help create an imaginative work of public art on their downtown waterfront. Fish sculptures hand-painted by students and adults in the city will be affixed to a sinuous, 20-foot-long "wave wall" to be installed in Proprietor's Park along the Delaware River. The transparent, 7-foot-high wall is the first step in a $30,000, privately funded effort to improve the appearance of an imposing but rather stark waterfront landmark known as the Betsy Ross Pavilion, as well as its surroundings.
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
A Camden County judge ruled Thursday that an initial plea deal offered to 76ers player Jahlil Okafor was valid, meaning Okafor will pay a $439 fine for speeding on the Benjamin Franklin Bridge but will not be required to do community service, Okafor's attorney said. Andrew Smith said that Okafor had paid the fee on the charges, but that the check was not accepted because Camden's law office decided it wanted to vacate the agreement. Smith said he believed this was so that community service could be added to Okafor's punishment.
NEWS
February 16, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
Longtime Inquirer columnist, editor and reporter Acel Moore knew his city and he loved it. This is how he wrote in 2001 about legendary former Temple University basketball coach John Chaney - who, like Moore, hailed from South Philadelphia. "He is a man who understands what it means to live across the tracks. (That means on either side of Washington Avenue.) "He has seen his mother buy dry goods on Fourth Street. . . . He understands the feeling of having only enough money to eat pickles for lunch or baloney sandwiches for dinner.
NEWS
February 15, 2016
ISSUE | TEMPLE STADIUM Don't disrupt neighborhood; stay at Linc It is outrageous that Temple plans to spend at least $126 million of other people's money to build a football stadium so its team can play there perhaps six times a year ("Temple moves forward with stadium plans," Tuesday). This from a university that cut seven varsity teams for financial reasons, hires 1,400 adjunct instructors, has had its state funding significantly reduced, and repeatedly increases tuition.
NEWS
February 15, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Cynthia Roberts, 62, former director of the Parent-Infant Center in West Philadelphia, and a dynamic leader in the University City community, died Wednesday, Feb. 10, of complications from pancreatic cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Ms. Roberts, along with her husband, Inquirer politics editor Daniel R. Biddle, was a fixture in the Spruce Hill neighborhood for more than 30 years - as a tireless civic worker and the driving force behind the revival of Clark Park, just a few blocks from the couple's home.
NEWS
February 14, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For the Daily News
SINCE ITS founding two years ago, the Center for Contemporary Mysticism (CfCM) at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Chestnut Hill has aimed to stretch the boundaries of what's sacred. Its members seek ways to "connect with things spiritual and mystical in the world when we might not be looking for it or even recognize it as such," says Joseph Irwin, the center's coordinator. The group's eclectic events programming - including talks by visiting authors and mystics, and classes in mindfulness and meditation - is already attracting hundreds of patrons.
NEWS
February 13, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Kathryn Brossard Clarke Varnell, 93, formerly of Warwick Township, Chester County, a mother and civic volunteer, died Saturday, Feb. 6, of a heart ailment at Riddle Village in Media. Known as "Kay," she was an only child reared in a house with servants during the Depression, and grew up to spend her life working for family and community. "Officially, she died of aortic stenosis," said her son, John Clarke, emeritus professor of surgery at Drexel University, "but she really died because, blind and ultimately unable to walk, she could no longer help other people.
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