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NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Tolentine Community Center, high above the dozens of South Philadelphia kids who zoom on gym-class scooters and toss basketballs, loom two Autoframe Bingo King scoreboards. For years, prodigious bingo games funneled hundreds of thousands of dollars through this city-owned building. In time, the games became a source of neighborhood bewilderment. "Those machines," Tony Mattei said, "I'd like to sell them. " Mattei, 77, is interim executive director at Tolentine, where officials insist that after-school programs and summer camp - not bingo - are the priority.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three months ahead of Pope Francis' visit to Philadelphia, the new president of the Philadelphia County Medical Society said the city's hospitals are prepared to respond if a medical crisis - even a disaster - arises during the pope's stay. Francis' September arrival is expected to draw up to two million people to Philadelphia. The city's hospitals are gearing up for the medical situations that arise regularly during big events, such as fainting in crowds, as well as the possibility of disasters or problems with Francis' own health.
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Monday, 10 "Community Fathers" will be recognized for their commitment and dedication to bettering Philadelphia. Each Philadelphian will receive a BMe Leader Award, which includes a $10,000 grant for the winners to increase their community outreach efforts. BMe Community is a national network for around 12,000 men - predominantly African American, though open to people of all races and genders - who uplift the community, defying negative stereotypes. "They care about the community," said Jeff Jones, community manager at BMe. "They are doing the work that helps people be better, and grow economically and socially.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before laying my head to rest the other night, Black Twitter blessed me with something magical. Scrolling through my feed, I noticed #unconventionalblackbeauty, a hashtag featuring photos of beautiful black faces. Not much different from #blackoutday, an online movement that celebrated black beauty, right? Wrong. The difference: This was an honest discourse about how we define beauty within the black community. In less than 24 hours, feeds exploded with photos of women and men with full lips, broad noses, and kinky hair.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
HEIMDAL, N.D. - Arden Georgeson, 78, thought the dark column rising skyward was a tornado. He shouted to his wife, Linda, 72, to run to the cellar. Then the Georgesons made out orange flames along the railroad tracks adjoining their farm, and the source of the smoke came into focus: A mile-long train transporting crude oil had derailed. The fiery wreck last month was the second in North Dakota since 2013, and the 10th in North America in two years, including five already in 2015.
NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Before the Affordable Care Act, it wasn't unusual for people in the LGBT community to be locked out of health insurance. Insurers could legally deny coverage based on a person's sexual orientation, gender identity, or pre-existing health condition. "It was everything from trans men and women being denied health coverage because their health history was confusing to a hospital or an insurance company, to young LGBT people not being able to afford coverage," said Brian Sims, a Pennsylvania state representative, lawyer, and LGBT civil rights activist.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thursday was the last day of school for the youngest students at Our Mother of Sorrows St. Ignatius School in West Philadelphia, and administrators were thankful that it was time to wrap up for the summer. That morning, they had arrived at the lower-school building at 43d and Wallace Streets to find busted locks and glass - signs that someone had broken in. "We didn't want the little kids to see the broken glass," said Rosemary Haenn, one of the school's two coprincipals. The youngest students, 164 from prekindergarten through third grade, spent their last day of school in church.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Community College of Philadelphia has had "mixed success" educating its students, though its tuition is far above the median for similar institutions - and higher than those of all other community colleges in the region, according to a report by the Pew Charitable Trusts. Pew found that the school's graduation rate was no better than about average, and in some cases was below those of its peers. The college also falls short in employee training programs, serves a smaller percentage of city residents than peer schools, and has failed to meet some standards set by the agency that accredits colleges and Pennsylvania's Board of Nursing, Pew researchers said in the 56-page report, released Wednesday.
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The long-awaited Winslow Township High School's junior/senior prom was supposed to be a night dreams are made of. For months, a committee of juniors worked long hours to craft a fitting send-off for the seniors, who had looked forward to the gala for four years. The theme was Old Hollywood "Glitz & Glam," and for the close to 400 students who turned out at the Mansion on Main Street in Voorhees, it was an absolute star turn. But just about two hours into the May 15 prom, as the DJ was playing Fetty Wap's "Trap Queen," the power went out. Some thought it was a senior prank.
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