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NEWS
May 23, 2016 | Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
When I learned Prince had died on April 21, my first thoughts were about someone I barely know: Karen from the South Fourth Street post office. And I wasn't the only one. My former housemate, now living in Brooklyn and caring for a newborn, sent me a text asking if I'd checked on Karen. Another friend sent me an unsolicited email saying she was going to go to the post office to express her sympathies. On the page of a private Facebook group of South Philly residents, dozens of people said they were concerned about Karen and there was talk of sending cards and flowers.
NEWS
May 21, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Unions need to stand together against levy Philadelphia unions that are supporting Mayor Kenney's regressive 3-cents-an-ounce sugary-drinks tax don't have all the facts. The Teamsters stand against the tax because we would lose as many as 2,000 members' jobs if it passes, which would be a devastating blow. As president of the Pennsylvania Conference of Teamsters and vice president of the Eastern Region, I support every union in this state. If any government or corporate entity attacked a core industry of another union the way Philadelphia is attacking the beverage industry - to the Teamsters' detriment - we would be at their side.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
Peco Energy Co. wants to install a self-sustaining "microgrid" in a Delaware County community that has endured a large number of power outages. The utility has asked the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission for permission to spend about $35 million to install the experimental microgrid in Concord Township, Delaware County, along the Route 1 corridor in Concordville. The microgrid, which could operate independently of the regional power grid during an widespread outage, would supply power to a 388-acre area that includes the Concord Township Municipal Complex, a fire station, a sewage-treatment plant, a retirement community, two medical facilities, two motels, two shopping centers, and a Wawa store.
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
THREE YEARS ago, Christina Morton went back to school to get her GED, hoping for a promotion in her job helping people with intellectual disabilities. Her daughter Mellitta Bailey was already enrolled at Community College of Philadelphia, on course to become a registered nurse. But Morton got injured at her job, tearing both the ACL and meniscus in her left knee, and stopped working to recuperate. That's when Bailey suggested her mother enroll in CCP, too. "She encouraged me," said Morton, who enrolled in 2013.
NEWS
May 16, 2016
Debra Todd is a Pennsylvania Supreme Court justice In my time as a judge, no cases have affected me more than those involving the sexual abuse of children. Throughout my 16 years on the appellate bench, I have been astounded by the sheer number of these cases that come before our courts. These are, indeed, the most appalling of crimes, perpetrated upon the most innocent and vulnerable members of our society. As a judge and as a mother, I am issuing a wake-up call to mothers. For most of us, the thought of an adult sexually abusing a child is inconceivable.
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Jonathan Tamari, STAFF WRITERS
Last month, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah took his case to the voters, who booted him from office after a two-decade congressional career. This week, the Philadelphia Democrat will face a smaller panel, 12 jurors, with a much larger concern at stake - his freedom. Opening arguments in Fattah's federal racketeering conspiracy trial are set to begin Monday in what promises to be one of the most closely watched political cases in recent Philadelphia history. The congressman and four close political allies are charged with misusing federal grant funds, campaign contributions, and charitable donations to pay off Fattah's debts and further his career - in which he has risen from West Philadelphia political upstart to member of Congress' old guard and holder of a seat on the powerful House Appropriations Committee.
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
The single best way to strengthen the country is to invest in its students, Vice President Biden told a group of professors, students, and administrators at Community College of Philadelphia on Monday. He was there to announce an Obama administration plan to spend $100 million to expand education and training programs that give community college students skills most in demand by employers. The plan includes the president's initiative to offer tuition-free education to community college students, a proposal he announced last year.
NEWS
April 23, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Camden officials are hoping to turn several city schools into "community schools" that would provide students with health and social services beyond those provided during class hours. Plans are in the early stages, but Brendan Lowe, a spokesman for the state-run district, said officials hope to select three to six traditional public schools before the next school year. Lowe said that the New Jersey Education Association, the state teachers' union, supports the idea, and that members have met with district officials to discuss the plans.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Melanie Burney and Rita Giordano, STAFF WRITERS
Second-generation Burlington County farmer Anthony Russo III made a mark on the business he loved as an advocate and mentor and role model for New Jersey farmers. Russo, 73, a respected longtime farmer and pillar in the rural Tabernacle community, died Thursday afternoon after a tragic accident at his farm. Russo, who owned Russo's Fruit & Vegetable Farm in Tabernacle, was struck by a tractor about 1:50 p.m., New Jersey State Police said Friday. He was rushed by medics to Virtua Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly, where he was pronounced dead a short time later.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Community Integrated Services is expanding its operations at 441 N. Fifth St., in Northern Liberties, to about 8,700 square feet, according to brokerage PernaFrederick Commercial Real Estate, which represented the employment-search and -support agency in the lease. CIS, which specializes in job placements for people with disabilities, has occupied about 6,400 square feet in the 80,000-square-foot, four-story building since 2006, PernaFrederick said in a release on Thursday. The lease extends to "the later years of this decade," the brokerage said.
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