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SPORTS
September 4, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard Hopkins drove south on Broad Street on Tuesday morning, breezing past Joe Frazier's old boxing gym, which has been turned into a discount furniture store. The gym at North Broad Street and Glenwood Avenue, where Hopkins' uncle took him when he was 9 years old, now advertises "knockout prices. " The brick-walled first floor - where Hopkins and most Philadelphia boxers learned the craft - is a showroom of couches and bureaus. Hopkins, the oldest world champion in boxing history at 49, plans to alter the building's future as early as next spring when the current lease ends.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jonathan Jusino spent his first year out of high school as a stock clerk and sales associate at a clothing store, and found it unfulfilling. "I noticed there was no future for me in the work I was doing," he said. So Jusino enrolled at Community College of Philadelphia last fall as a first step in pursuing a teaching career. With his financial aid, it would have taken him three years to get his associate's degree. But a program introduced by the college this semester will allow him to finish in 21/2.
NEWS
August 27, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
In neighborhoods such as Fishtown and Northern Liberties, arts and artists stimulated big growth and new vitality. In battered Mantua - the heart of a new federal Promise Zone - it can seem as if the arts departed with the people. Now, a team of Drexel University faculty and students is offering a plan to support a growing number of artists as a way to lift an area pulverized by crime, poverty, and unemployment. "It's not art for art's sake, it's art for the sake of the good of the neighborhood," said Andrew Zitcer, an assistant teaching professor at Drexel who studies urban policy.
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | BY SHIRA GOODMAN & NICHOLAS RAMSEY
ON AUG. 1, just before 10 p.m. on Etting Street near Dickinson, in Grays Ferry, neighbors filled the street enjoying the mild summer evening. Three-year-old Tynirah Borum sat on a porch getting her hair braided. Two young men from the neighborhood arrived on a bicycle, began arguing and with complete disregard for life, fired off several rounds from a handgun. Tragically, they shot four people, one of whom was Tynirah. Shot through the left side of her chest, she died not long after.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the Hearts on a Wire Collective, a grassroots movement to support transgender people in and out of prison, the fate of their fall 2013 newsletter seemed proof that logic was lost in Pennsylvania's correctional system. A member reported that the newsletter, a compendium of drawings, poems, essays, homegrown legal advice, and obituaries, was confiscated at the State Correctional Institution (SCI) Fayette - because it contained "information regarding the manufacture of explosives, incendiaries, weapons, escape devices or other contraband.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Shirley Tax spends her days at Chinatown Medical Services fielding questions from patients who bought health insurance on the Affordable Care Act marketplace. Most of those queries revolve around Independence Blue Cross' best-selling, silver-level Keystone HMO Proactive plan. Tax says patients signed up for the tiered plan without really understanding how it worked. So when they receive a bill they take it to Tax and ask her to explain it. "Most of them didn't have insurance before," Tax, 26, says of her clients, many of whom are immigrants.
NEWS
August 14, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AS AN EDUCATOR for five decades, Anna Young always took special interest in the often-unmet needs of urban students. In fact, the longtime English teacher wrote a book on the subject, Relationship of Writing and Self-Esteem Among Urban High School Students , in which she discussed how proficiency in self-expression could help city kids feel better about themselves and their place in the world. Far ahead of her time, Anna Young actually was one of the first African-American teachers in the Philadelphia School District when she began her career in the 1940s.
NEWS
August 12, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
THE HOT August sun beat heavily on 19th Street and Hunting Park Avenue yesterday. But that didn't stop Jameer Greer, 10, and Jhafi Sexton, 15, from standing at the corner, directing drivers to a car wash on the block. Greer and Sexton spent the day working the event at Time Out Car Wash, in Nicetown, as part of a fundraiser for WANPAE - Worry About Nothing Purpose is Alive in Everyone - a Philly organization that teaches preteens and teenagers entrepreneurship and how to pursue their passions.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The handoff of patients from hospitals to nursing homes has taken on increased significance now that Medicare penalizes hospitals if too many patients are readmitted unnecessarily within 30 days of discharge. To help prevent a breakdown in that transition and to generally improve care for its patients, Virtua, which bills itself as South Jersey's biggest health system, has formed a preferred provider network for nursing homes and rehabilitation centers. The plan is part of an effort at Virtua to cast a wider net of care in the community it serves in preparation for a time when insurers will pay health systems for keeping people out of the hospital, not just for procedures and stays in the hospital.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EVERY SATURDAY evening, needy people knew they could score some fresh produce and baked goods from Puddin's Pantry. Elvira L. "Puddin'" Evans started the pantry about 15 years ago on a lot across the street from her home on Pleasant Street in Germantown. She made the rounds every week of farmers' markets and food companies like Genuardi's to gather donated food for her program. It wasn't surprising that the project grew as word spread about its existence, and a local newspaper wrote about it. Elvira eventually had to look for another venue.
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