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NEWS
August 14, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
AS AN EDUCATOR for five decades, Anna Young always took special interest in the often-unmet needs of urban students. In fact, the longtime English teacher wrote a book on the subject, Relationship of Writing and Self-Esteem Among Urban High School Students , in which she discussed how proficiency in self-expression could help city kids feel better about themselves and their place in the world. Far ahead of her time, Anna Young actually was one of the first African-American teachers in the Philadelphia School District when she began her career in the 1940s.
NEWS
August 12, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
THE HOT August sun beat heavily on 19th Street and Hunting Park Avenue yesterday. But that didn't stop Jameer Greer, 10, and Jhafi Sexton, 15, from standing at the corner, directing drivers to a car wash on the block. Greer and Sexton spent the day working the event at Time Out Car Wash, in Nicetown, as part of a fundraiser for WANPAE - Worry About Nothing Purpose is Alive in Everyone - a Philly organization that teaches preteens and teenagers entrepreneurship and how to pursue their passions.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The handoff of patients from hospitals to nursing homes has taken on increased significance now that Medicare penalizes hospitals if too many patients are readmitted unnecessarily within 30 days of discharge. To help prevent a breakdown in that transition and to generally improve care for its patients, Virtua, which bills itself as South Jersey's biggest health system, has formed a preferred provider network for nursing homes and rehabilitation centers. The plan is part of an effort at Virtua to cast a wider net of care in the community it serves in preparation for a time when insurers will pay health systems for keeping people out of the hospital, not just for procedures and stays in the hospital.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EVERY SATURDAY evening, needy people knew they could score some fresh produce and baked goods from Puddin's Pantry. Elvira L. "Puddin'" Evans started the pantry about 15 years ago on a lot across the street from her home on Pleasant Street in Germantown. She made the rounds every week of farmers' markets and food companies like Genuardi's to gather donated food for her program. It wasn't surprising that the project grew as word spread about its existence, and a local newspaper wrote about it. Elvira eventually had to look for another venue.
REAL_ESTATE
July 28, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
David La Fontaine is the new executive director of Community Ventures, a Quaker-inspired builder of affordable housing and one of the few nonprofit developers left in the city. Its latest projects include Ingersoll Commons at 16th and Master Streets, affordable housing with open green space, and Centennial Village, affordable rental apartments behind the Mann Music Center at 52d Street and Parkside Avenue. La Fontaine is pushing for more affordable housing, even as million-dollar homes keep popping up around Center City.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Jessica Parks and Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Built by neighbors in response to racial segregation, the pool at the George Washington Carver Community Center in Norristown had opened every summer since 1960. As the only outdoor public pool in the municipality, it was not just a place for kids to swim, but a point of pride for a struggling community. In recent years, the center has struggled to raise the money to open the pool. This summer, it won't open at all. The closure has become a tipping point, heightening calls for a public-private model or municipal oversight of an institution that has been run by volunteers for six decades.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Melvin V. Dorn, 69, a North Philadelphia community advocate and civil rights activist who worked closely with Cecil B. Moore and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., died Monday, July 21, of heart failure at Einstein Medical Center. Mr. Dorn was a stalwart in Philadelphia civil rights efforts, including protests against segregation at Girard College. It was during those protests that Mr. Dorn began working with Moore, the lawyer and civil rights leader. In an interview in January, Mr. Dorn recalled that before he worked with King and Moore, he was a tough teen from North Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many of us think of food aimed at the elderly as the bland, dated stuff that might show up on an early-bird-special menu: meat loaf and mashed potatoes. So, it may be a bit of a surprise to learn what dinner was like on a recent weeknight at Normandy Farms Estates, a Blue Bell retirement community that is home to more than 500 people. Average age at entry: 80. The menu at the Fireside Grille included marinated salmon on sautéed fresh spinach, topped with sliced peaches; sweet and bitter grilled cheese (three cheeses with Spanish onion marmalade, tomatoes, and baby arugula)
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
EDUCATORS, PARENTS, community groups and universities that have bold ideas to improve a Philadelphia public school now have a vehicle to pitch their plans. The school district yesterday announced the start of the School Redesign Initiative, its latest effort to allow stakeholders to identify, develop and implement their innovative plans at existing schools. The district said the goal is to increase the number of high-quality schools, but many question the rationale behind the plan at a time when schools lack basic resources, such as counselors, full-time nurses and librarians, and the district faces an estimated $93 million deficit, which could require hundreds of layoffs.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
DEWEN BOWAH's right arm is still bandaged, hiding severe burns from the fatal flames of the Gesner Street fire. She sat last night on the porch of her sister's house in Darby, her voice barely above a whisper - the lingering effects of smoke inhalation. Bowah deferred questions to Milton Musa, the man who caught two of her daughters as they leaped from their burning home July 5. Her youngest girls, twins Maria and Marialla, perished in the terrible inferno. "It's a sad, sad situation," Musa said.
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