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May 24, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Perhaps it will never be clear to Melissa Wilde whether a 7-year-old boy who died this week after falling ill at a South Philadelphia school would have lived had a full-time nurse been present. But the question still haunts Wilde, a Jackson Elementary School parent. "Who will be there next time?" she asked Thursday. "What if this school had a full-time nurse? What if this school had a full-time counselor? Could they save the next child's life?" The first grader, whose name is not being released, died Wednesday afternoon at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia after becoming sick at Jackson, where a school nurse works only on Thursdays and every other Friday.
NEWS
May 21, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
DOZENS OF Central High School students and alums lined the entrance to their school and the front hallway inside, wearing their school colors proudly and wildly waving their arms. "277! 277!" they cheered last Thursday, high-fiving members of the incoming class as they entered the school. This was no pep rally in the traditional sense, but the annual Central High School freshman orientation for September's incoming class, known in these parts as 277. "It was really lively and felt like a homecoming," said Nathan Zeyl, 14, referring to the students' welcome.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
T OM HICKEY, 34, of Old City, is CEO and a partner in the creative startup Engagement Studios. Hickey was a deputy press secretary for former Gov. Ed Rendell in 2000-03. He formed the company in November to reinvent the way people work and interact with communities by building engagement campaigns through integrated strategy, media, design and technology. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: I worked in PR and communications and politics. I wanted to work where you could help clients with a social mission and also take the same creative spark and do the same for your projects.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A coalition of about 20 African American community activists announced plans Friday to develop an agenda for reducing poverty in Philadelphia's black community. Known collectively as the Philadelphia Community of Leaders, the group said during a news conference at Laborers District Council headquarters that it planned to address the difficult issue of poverty by focusing on improving education and economic development and reducing violence. The nonprofit group, which includes developers Kenny Gamble and Rahim Islam, lawyer George Burrell, antiviolence activist Bilal Qayyum, and former School Reform Commission Chairwoman Sandra Dungee Glenn, also announced it would host its first community conference at 8:30 a.m. Saturday at Universal Audenried High School, 3301 Tasker St. The event, which is open to the public, will allow members to present their issues and goals and engage members of the community, Islam said.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
YORK - Amid the swirl of campaign rhetoric in the Democratic primary for governor, she's the often nameless, always faceless African American woman killed long ago. But to the residents of this hardscrabble industrial city south of Harrisburg, Lillie Belle Allen remains a symbol of the violence and racial hatred that raged here in 1969. "I've heard stories," said Shawn Markel, 23, who lives a few hundred yards from the spot where Allen was gunned down by a white mob a generation before he was born.
NEWS
May 6, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
WHEN HE turned 18, Eduardo Grob left his mother and his home in Brazil to come to Philadelphia and search for his alcoholic father, whom he hadn't seen since he was 3 years old. Grob, now 25, didn't speak English. He worked at a fast-food restaurant and lived in a homeless shelter. He longed for a father and a future. Jason Mays, 30, of West Oak Lane, enlisted in the Army a week after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, served in Iraq, came home suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and feared he'd end up homeless on the streets of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 30, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
TIME AND TIME again over the past 37 years, members of Philadelphia's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community have rallied around Giovanni's Room, the country's oldest LGBT bookstore, founded in the city. But Ed Hermance, 73, who's owned the shop since 1976, said with the advent of online retailers like Amazon.com, the grass roots just aren't enough to keep the specialty bookstore - one of only a handful of dedicated LGBT stores remaining in the country - afloat anymore.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dementia is terrible for everyone, but elderly people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) face extra problems, says Ed Bomba, communications chair for the LGBT Elder Initiative in Philadelphia. Many have spent much of their lives in the closet and fear discrimination by medical or social service providers or even the people they might live with in nursing homes. "We don't have children, as a rule. We don't have partners, as a rule, as we age," Bomba said. Many older LGBT people were rejected by their families and have created support systems of friends.
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