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Compactor

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NEWS
December 18, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
A 16-year-old supermarket clerk was seriously injured yesterday when he was crushed inside a trash compactor, apparently while playing with another teenager who activated the machine, Haverford Township police said. The clerk, Daniel Jerdan, of the 6700 block of Lansdowne Avenue in Philadelphia's Overbrook section, was in fair condition last night in the pediatric intensive-care unit of Hahnemann University Hospital, a hospital spokeswoman said. He suffered stomach injuries and a broken left leg and right arm, she said.
NEWS
November 16, 1993 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
One day last spring, a city sanitation crew finished its route and parked its big blue 32-yard compactor truck at the northwest sanitation yard in Roxborough. Moments later, workers smelled smoke and looked out to see the truck ablaze. The truck was destroyed. The fire was the eighth to occur in the 32-yarders, pride of the city's sanitation fleet, and the second that totalled a vehicle. A hundred 32-yard compactors, purchased in 1988 and '89, were to bring a new age of efficiency in Philadelphia trash collection.
NEWS
April 21, 2006 | By Stephanie L. Arnold INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you had to be evacuated from your home due to a hazardous chemical emergency, yesterday's clear spring weather provided a good day for it. Dozens of residents of the 2100 block of East Monmouth Street in Kensington were temporarily displaced from their homes and forced to stand outside a safe distance away for about a half hour after a city sanitation worker and two nearby parked cars were exposed to the fumes from a discarded fire extinguisher, police...
NEWS
December 25, 1999 | By Shankar Vedantam and Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Four masked gunmen robbed 18 B.J.'s Wholesale Club employees, locked the workers in a large cardboard compactor, and ransacked the store late Thursday night, police said yesterday. The gunmen forced the manager to unlock the jewelry and video-camera sections of the store at 2054 Red Lion Rd. They took the merchandise after locking the manager in the trash bin, too. The store uses the compactor - 20 feet long and six feet high - to compress cardboard into blocks. It is is just outside the store and connected to the main building by a ramp and a door.
NEWS
July 11, 1998 | By Angela Galloway, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Investigators are looking into whether afterbirth found outside a hospital in West Chester matches the newborn baby discovered on June 28, some 45 miles away in a metal trash basket at a Delaware car wash. A placenta and attached umbilical cord were discovered in an outdoor trash compactor at Chester County Hospital about 6:30 a.m. June 29 - less than 24 hours after the baby's body was found at a car wash in Smyrna, Del., said Rodger Rothenberger, chief Chester County coroner. Rothenberger's office gave the afterbirth to the Delaware state medical examiner's office on June 29 for DNA testing to determine whether it matches the abandoned baby, he said.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | by Yvonne Latty and Jack McGuire, Daily News Staff Writers
A West Oak Lane woman was charged with murder yesterday after trash collectors found her 3-day-old baby dead among the rubbish in their truck. The woman was identified as Michelle Bailey, 24, of 20th Street near 66th Avenue. She also was charged with possession of an instrument of crime, abuse of a corpse and endangering the welfare of a child. Police said the woman admitted that the baby was hers. She was taken to Hahnemann University Hospital for observation. The baby, a boy, was born alive early Saturday, police said.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | By Stella M. Eisele, Special to The Inquirer
A May 2 fire at Whitford Industries is still under investigation by the Chester County fire marshal. The fire, which began overnight, has been ruled accidental, but officials are searching for the cause, said Fire Marshal William H. Winters. The fire probably started in an industrial trash compactor attached to the rear of the building or in the trash bin attached to the compactor, he said. Firefighters prevented the blaze from spreading to the manufacturing section of the plant.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rendell administration is supposed to be changing work rules, job descriptions and schedules to increase efficiency. How has it affected city employees? Ask workers finishing a shift at the sanitation yard at 7th and Pattison, and they'll say they don't know what you're talking about. What they will say, with profanity in profusion, is that they're ticked off at the Rendell administration and the labor contract they were handed a year ago. None would give their names, but everyone gave it to their bosses.
NEWS
March 24, 1987 | By Jimmy Breslin
The firemen said that because of the thick smoke, the two brothers and a sister who leaped from the 33d floor probably never saw anything until they broke out into clear sky halfway down, about the 15th floor, and now they had only a swift glimpse of the end of life before smacking dead on the cement courtyard. The firemen said they learned that bodies falling from that height do not land with a thud. "Shotgun going off," one of them said. "Just like a shotgun," the other said.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Given the erratic history of South Street, something could always change. But it looks as if, by this time in 2014, both ends of the city's most irrepressible district will be capped by shiny new condo developments. The currently vacant sites have been caught in limbo for a decade or more. Like forlorn urban wallflowers, they have wishfully accepted invitations from a succession of rich suitors - Will Smith among them - who ultimately decided the dance ticket wasn't worth the trouble or money.
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NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Given the erratic history of South Street, something could always change. But it looks as if, by this time in 2014, both ends of the city's most irrepressible district will be capped by shiny new condo developments. The currently vacant sites have been caught in limbo for a decade or more. Like forlorn urban wallflowers, they have wishfully accepted invitations from a succession of rich suitors - Will Smith among them - who ultimately decided the dance ticket wasn't worth the trouble or money.
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CANTON, Ga. - A 20-year-old maintenance man with no known criminal past was arrested yesterday in the beating death of a 7-year-old north Georgia girl who was abducted at the apartment complex where she lived and he worked, and was left dead in a trash bin. Ryan Brunn, who also lived at complex, was jailed on a murder warrant, said Georgia Bureau of Investigation Director Vernon Keenan. Authorities said Jorelys Rivera was last seen Friday night leaving the playground to walk back home to get drinks for her friends.
NEWS
July 21, 2010 | By ALAN BUTKOVITZ
IT'S TROUBLING that, in a recent editorial, the Daily News would so readily dismiss as a "technical issue" the highly questionable awarding of a sole-source contract that has now cost taxpayers $3.2 million for the purchase of 768 high-tech trash compactors. These compactors were purchased for $3,700 each - and cost taxpayers more than $200,000 in lost savings so far - an amount that could grow to as much as $500,000 when additional units are eventually delivered. Sole-source contracts skirt the usual bidding process and are only permitted for unique items that can only be purchased from one vendor and can't be competitively bid on the open market.
NEWS
July 19, 2010
ICAN'T BELIEVE how much those solar trash cans cost. What a waste of money. Me personally, I don't use them and know others who don't. For all that money, they should have made them open up automatically. I can't stand touching that handle that the whole world has touched - it's so dirty! I walked three blocks one day with my trash in hand because I didn't want to touch the dirty handles. To me those cans are useless. It was money wasted. Cynthia Perkins, Philadelphia
NEWS
July 16, 2010
THE HEADLINES promoted by the controller's review of the BigBelly compactor program do not reflect the facts. Before installing the units in Center City, the Streets Department relied on 33 workers to collect litter baskets 24 hours a day, seven days week. We now use 70 percent fewer people who work a single shift, five days a week. The savings from the elimination of 24 positions through attrition are unquestionable. Regarding the report's speculation that a distributor could have cost less than purchasing direct from the manufacturer, there is an acknowledgment in the report's details that they could not verify the claim of lower price availability.
NEWS
July 13, 2010
The City Controller's office said yesterday that the BigBelly solar trash compactors around Philadelphia aren't saving as much as the city claimed they would. A by-the-numbers look: $2.2M: Amount of a sole-source contract between the city and BigBelly for 500 trash compactors and 210 recycling kiosks agreed to in April 2009. The contract was paid for out of a state recycling grant. $13M : Amount the city said it would save over 10 years with 70 percent reduction in operating costs, including trash pickup.
NEWS
July 13, 2010 | By JOSH FERNANDEZ, fernanj@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
THE CITY might have been better off keeping its old $100 wire trash baskets - and throwing away the contract to buy 710 new solar-powered trash compactors. That's according to the City Controller's Office, which released a report yesterday claiming the BigBelly compactors aren't as good a deal as city and company officials promised, and that contracting rules were broken. The purchase of 500 compactors and 210 recycling units for more than $2.1 million from BigBelly Solar - or about $3,700 each - were meant to reduce collection costs by 70 percent.
NEWS
July 13, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's BigBelly solar trash compactors - public receptacles located curbside throughout much of Center City and beyond - are more of a big bust than anything else, the city controller said Monday. In a 21-page report detailing numerous problems, Controller Alan Butkovitz said the city paid too much - $3,700 apiece - in a no-bid contract. First installed in spring 2009, the BigBellies - nearly 800 are in use - also are not working as intended, the report concluded. "There is a complete lack of accountability for these expensive trash cans," the controller said.
NEWS
July 11, 2008 | By Ashwin Verghese INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City leaders cut the ribbon on a new solar-powered trash receptacle yesterday and then, appropriately, threw the ribbon away. The ribbon-cutting in Center City came during the unveiling of the BigBelly, a trash receptacle and compactor that can store four times the volume of ordinary litter baskets and cut fuel use and greenhouse emissions from trash collection by 80 percent. To top it all off, the waste container can run daily on the amount of energy needed to toast a slice of bread.
NEWS
April 21, 2006 | By Stephanie L. Arnold INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you had to be evacuated from your home due to a hazardous chemical emergency, yesterday's clear spring weather provided a good day for it. Dozens of residents of the 2100 block of East Monmouth Street in Kensington were temporarily displaced from their homes and forced to stand outside a safe distance away for about a half hour after a city sanitation worker and two nearby parked cars were exposed to the fumes from a discarded fire extinguisher, police...
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