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BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
T ESS MICHAELS, 20, of University City, is a social entrepreneur and a Penn senior pursuing a dual degree in management and life sciences. The Philly native is the founder and CEO of Soceana, a startup that launched in January with tech-enabled platforms to generate social good. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Soceana? A: I volunteered a lot in high school and saw a need for a unique approach. At Wharton, I found that the corporate space was an effective way to bridge volunteerism with philanthropy.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vanguard Group has grown so large, it can throw its weight around in any boardroom in America. "We own about 5 percent of every publicly traded [U.S.] company," sometimes more, chief executive F. William McNabb told a conference at the University of Delaware's John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance on Oct. 30. McNabb said he has had to educate corporate managers who think Vanguard's funds of stocks, copied from indexes such as the S&P 500, are mere "passive" investors.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Berwyn and Paoli Fire Company officials agreed Tuesday to let Chester County's 911 task force decide for them the most efficient service boundaries for the two companies. The agreement, reached at a meeting with Tredyffrin Township officials, ends a longstanding dispute over which volunteer company could better serve certain areas in Tredyffrin. The dispute focused particularly on the Chesterbrook development of 2,392 homes and dozens of businesses now in the Berwyn company's service territory.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The companies headed by Nicholas Schorsch have bought more than $10 billion worth of hotels, clinics, stores, apartments, stockbrokerages, and investment funds across the United States, doubling their collective size. And that's just so far this year. "This is not growth for growth's sake," the fast-moving, solidly built Schorsch, 52, insisted in a conference call with investors Thursday. Rather, he said, "it is an all-out effort to gain competitive advantage" by growing so big that the group can buy and sell assets more cheaply.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareholders had their say on pay in a big way at public companies this year. But anyone expecting widespread revolt over the big sums that many executives earned was probably disappointed. Just 37 of 2,293 companies whose shareholders had voted on compensation practices as of June 21 had failed to receive at least 50 percent of the shares voted in favor of those practices, according to Semler Brossy Consulting Group L.L.C. , a Princeton compensation consulting firm.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Bean's business depends on tragedy. Tuesday's earthquake in Northern California and last month's hurricane in South Carolina are the stuff on which his Evans American Corp. thrives. Founded eight years ago in Houston by his father, the company specializes in catastrophe management - helping companies rebuild their crumbled facilities far more quickly than normal. "I don't know anybody who does exactly what we do," said Bean, president of the company. "I know people who rebuild damaged buildings, but we fit into a niche market inside of a niche market.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I TRACE MY roots back to 1862 (yes, during the Civil War) and railway legislation signed by Abraham Lincoln. Based in Omaha, I'm a top American transportation enterprise, with a railroad network spanning 23 states (mainly in the West) and more than 30,000 miles. I employ more than 40,000 people, use more than 8,000 locomotives and rake in more than $20 billion annually as I serve about 10,000 customers. My biggest customers include steamship lines, vehicle manufacturers, agricultural companies, utilities, intermodal companies and chemical manufacturers.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Ten Bucks County companies earned places on the Philadelphia 100, an annual list of fast-growing, privately held small companies in the Delaware Valley. "This year's companies are smaller than last year, more highly focused and probably have better long-term prospects," said David Thornburgh, director of the Wharton Small Business Development Center and manager of the project. "These are companies that have better defined their niche and have served those markets. They haven't had a strong economy to benefit from.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Bill Madway decided to take his own advice. After helping hundreds of people start their own companies, Madway started a research firm specializing in helping businesses buy and sell. "Research can help a company plan for the future by finding strengths and weaknesses and what the demand is for the company's product or service," Madway said. "The key is gathering information.. . . In a recession like the one we are in now, companies have to be more cautious about how they spend their money.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
November 20, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixteen companies have expressed interest in all or part of about 200 vacant acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. They include energy companies, marine terminal operators, auto processors, and multipurpose terminal operators with ideas for the maritime property, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge on the Delaware River. The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA) said Tuesday that it would evaluate the responses and make recommendations to its board, which will have the final say. Southport is three waterfront parcels: 119 acres referred to as Southport Marine Terminal; 75 acres known as Southport West Terminal; and the Pier 124 "north berth," a 1,132-foot-long finger pier.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Nancy G. Heller, For The Inquirer
In its Philadelphia debut on Thursday night, Israel's Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company (KCDC) presented If At All , by artistic director Rami Be'er. While this piece gave the dancers an opportunity to show off their strength, flexibility, and stamina, in the end it was only a partial success. Be'er says he doesn't tell stories with his choreography, so viewers can make up their own interpretations. But at points, the dancers drop to the floor, accompanied by sounds of gunfire and screaming; they also beat their chests and "stab" themselves.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware Gov. Jack Markell said Uber, Lyft, Airbnb and other companies in the "sharing economy" are important to the revitalization of Wilmington. "I want to make sure we are friendly to these new industries," he said Monday, noting that other regulators, such as the Philadelphia Parking Authority, have been aggressively opposed to Uber, the ride-share company. Young people are attracted to urban areas where sharing services such as Uber are available, he said. "We want to make sure our downtowns gets their fair share of that," he said.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vanguard Group has grown so large, it can throw its weight around in any boardroom in America. "We own about 5 percent of every publicly traded [U.S.] company," sometimes more, chief executive F. William McNabb told a conference at the University of Delaware's John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance on Oct. 30. McNabb said he has had to educate corporate managers who think Vanguard's funds of stocks, copied from indexes such as the S&P 500, are mere "passive" investors.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Pennsylvania company is advancing plans to build a dozen small power plants in the Marcellus Shale region, producing electricity for the grid directly from nearby gas wells. IMG Midstream L.L.C. on Friday presented plans to the Northern Tier Regional Planning and Development Commission in Wellsboro to build nine 20-megawatt power stations in Bradford, Tioga, Susquehanna, and Wyoming Counties. The company, which is based in the Pittsburgh suburb of Wexford and has a Bucks County office in Yardley, also plans to build several other 20-megawatt stations in shale-gas production areas in Southwestern Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two companies chaired by Nicholas S. Schorsch , a Jenkintown industrial heir turned New York-based real estate mogul, are fighting each other over a $700 million business deal that threatens to unravel after a financial reporting scandal. RCS Capital Corp ., Schorsch's investment bank, posted a statement early Monday that "it has terminated" its month-old agreement to buy Cole Capital Partners L.L.C. , an investment sales group, from American Realty Capital Properties Inc ., Schorsch's publicly traded real estate company and one of the nation's biggest commercial landlords.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The decadeslong consolidation of local cable TV firms into a few national networks led by Comcast Corp. has squeezed local outfits that used to wire customers for cable, according to a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court lawsuit by two Pennsylvania firms. Cable Line Inc. and McLaughlin Communications Inc. accuse Comcast Cable Communications of Pennsylvania Inc. of enticing them and other local operators to hire and train workers, add offices, borrow money for trucks and equipment - "only to abandon those firms once they had been induced to create the infrastructure necessary for Comcast's expansion," according to the lawsuit.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When software firms start buying marketing firms, you know something is changing in the way corporate America does business. LiquidHub , the Wayne-based "systems integrator" that customizes business software for Novartis , Subaru , Comcast , Vanguard , and other big companies, plans to announce Wednesday that it has acquired Foundry9 , a 100-person New York digital advertising and marketing agency that targets financial services...
NEWS
October 29, 2014
M IKE DERSHOWITZ, 39, of Bryn Mawr, is co-founder and president of ModSolar, an Ardmore B2B company that supports solar installers. ModSolar, which began in 2011, has a software platform enabling the installer to use a satellite snapshot of a customer's roof and design the ideal solar array on a mobile device or web browser, reducing expenses. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for ModSolar? A: I was at a home show and noticed home-improvement and solar companies making sales pitches and few used technology.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOHN KING was an ambulance driver in the Army Medical Corps on Newfoundland during World War II when he got a life-changing assignment. A group of Army nurses had been hiking on Telegraph Hill in St. John's when one of them fell and twisted an ankle and needed transport to a hospital. Along came the handsome medic to save the day. Love blossomed even though Florence Bialaszewski was a lieutenant and John was a lowly private. And because of the disparity in rank, their marriage on Newfoundland was kept a secret from the brass.
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