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BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 32 years, the party is over for Dance Celebration, the popular series of dance concerts presented at West Philadelphia's Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts. The series and name will be retired as of Monday. The decision arose from the diverging artistic visions of co-presenters Dance Affiliates and the Annenberg Center, said F. Randolph Swartz, artistic director of Dance Affiliates, and Michael J. Rose, managing director of the Annenberg. But there is a happy result: Each organization will go ahead with its own series as Dance Affiliates moves to Center City.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareholders had their say on pay in a big way at public companies this year. But anyone expecting widespread revolt over the big sums that many executives earned was probably disappointed. Just 37 of 2,293 companies whose shareholders had voted on compensation practices as of June 21 had failed to receive at least 50 percent of the shares voted in favor of those practices, according to Semler Brossy Consulting Group L.L.C. , a Princeton compensation consulting firm.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Berwyn and Paoli Fire Company officials agreed Tuesday to let Chester County's 911 task force decide for them the most efficient service boundaries for the two companies. The agreement, reached at a meeting with Tredyffrin Township officials, ends a longstanding dispute over which volunteer company could better serve certain areas in Tredyffrin. The dispute focused particularly on the Chesterbrook development of 2,392 homes and dozens of businesses now in the Berwyn company's service territory.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Bean's business depends on tragedy. Tuesday's earthquake in Northern California and last month's hurricane in South Carolina are the stuff on which his Evans American Corp. thrives. Founded eight years ago in Houston by his father, the company specializes in catastrophe management - helping companies rebuild their crumbled facilities far more quickly than normal. "I don't know anybody who does exactly what we do," said Bean, president of the company. "I know people who rebuild damaged buildings, but we fit into a niche market inside of a niche market.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The companies headed by Nicholas Schorsch have bought more than $10 billion worth of hotels, clinics, stores, apartments, stockbrokerages, and investment funds across the United States, doubling their collective size. And that's just so far this year. "This is not growth for growth's sake," the fast-moving, solidly built Schorsch, 52, insisted in a conference call with investors Thursday. Rather, he said, "it is an all-out effort to gain competitive advantage" by growing so big that the group can buy and sell assets more cheaply.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frustrated by a large number of small, fraudulent competitors, two of the largest Philadelphia-area ambulance operators recently joined forces. "The last couple of years have been really difficult for both companies. It's a very tough market," said Steve Barr, president and chief executive of Keystone Quality Transport Co., which has taken over the management of rival EMStar L.L.C. Company officials described the deal - which took effect Feb. 9, shortly after federal regulators launched an intensified crackdown on ambulance fraud in the Philadelphia region - as an alliance rather than a merger of the two privately owned medical transportation companies.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I TRACE MY roots back to 1862 (yes, during the Civil War) and railway legislation signed by Abraham Lincoln. Based in Omaha, I'm a top American transportation enterprise, with a railroad network spanning 23 states (mainly in the West) and more than 30,000 miles. I employ more than 40,000 people, use more than 8,000 locomotives and rake in more than $20 billion annually as I serve about 10,000 customers. My biggest customers include steamship lines, vehicle manufacturers, agricultural companies, utilities, intermodal companies and chemical manufacturers.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Ten Bucks County companies earned places on the Philadelphia 100, an annual list of fast-growing, privately held small companies in the Delaware Valley. "This year's companies are smaller than last year, more highly focused and probably have better long-term prospects," said David Thornburgh, director of the Wharton Small Business Development Center and manager of the project. "These are companies that have better defined their niche and have served those markets. They haven't had a strong economy to benefit from.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Bill Madway decided to take his own advice. After helping hundreds of people start their own companies, Madway started a research firm specializing in helping businesses buy and sell. "Research can help a company plan for the future by finding strengths and weaknesses and what the demand is for the company's product or service," Madway said. "The key is gathering information.. . . In a recession like the one we are in now, companies have to be more cautious about how they spend their money.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Mabin Sr. has worked on railroad equipment for four decades. He's never fulfilled an order like the one he received Thursday. Following the crash of Amtrak Train 188, the agency needed two new catenary portal structures at Frankford Junction to get its Northeast Corridor service operational again. The tall steel structures hold the overhead wires above rail lines. Each one requires about 15 tons of metal. Typically, they take at least six weeks to create. Amtrak asked Mabin if his company could build two in three days.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 32 years, the party is over for Dance Celebration, the popular series of dance concerts presented at West Philadelphia's Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts. The series and name will be retired as of Monday. The decision arose from the diverging artistic visions of co-presenters Dance Affiliates and the Annenberg Center, said F. Randolph Swartz, artistic director of Dance Affiliates, and Michael J. Rose, managing director of the Annenberg. But there is a happy result: Each organization will go ahead with its own series as Dance Affiliates moves to Center City.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Jack E. Oppasser, 75, of Malvern and Stuart, Fla., a retired petrochemical company executive, died Thursday, April 30, of cancer at his Florida home. Mr. Oppasser was hired by the Atlantic Richfield Co. in 1962, and he held various positions in human resources, business management, and marketing. He rose to senior vice president of Arco Chemical's European operation in Maidenhead, England, and in 1991 was appointed its president, succeeding Alan R. Hirsig, who was named president and chief executive officer of the larger Atlantic Richfield Co. After 33 years of service, Mr. Oppasser announced he would retire during 1995, but he stayed on to ensure an orderly transition to a corporate structure based on product type rather than geography.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
At stake is a claim to the historic origins of the musical instrument that bellows "oompah" at parades and halftime shows, and for the Philadelphia band the Roots. Who built the first sousaphone, the largest member of the tuba family, named for patriotic-music icon John Philip Sousa? For decades, the issue has been in dispute, with the choice between a music publisher in Exton, Chester County, and an instrument manufacturer in Elkhart, Ind. More than a century after the first instrument was crafted, a Harleysville pastor and a Kentucky collector have stepped into the debate, adding a previously unknown piece of information they believe helps to firmly place the sousaphone's 1890s beginnings in Pennsylvania with music publisher J.W. Pepper Co. "There's no doubt," said Dave Detwiler, a pastor at LCBC BranchCreek church in Harleysville.
NEWS
April 28, 2015
T ONYA COMER, 43, of Fishtown, owns Tonya Comer Interiors, a design firm with residential and business clients in nine states and the District of Columbia. The Pittsburgh native grew up in a public-housing project and was raised by a single parent. She has an undergraduate degree from Duquesne and an MBA from Michigan State. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the company? A: I discovered a passion for interior design working for an office-furniture company. A client asked me to design her kitchen.
NEWS
April 26, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
  More than 400 people from across the region were invited to learn how their businesses can benefit most when the World Meeting of Families takes place in September in Philadelphia. But only about 35 came out Friday for the session at SS. Simon and Jude Parish in Westtown, Chester County. The low turnout underscored why the Chester County Chamber of Business and Industry organized the event. It wants local businesses and groups to know they, too, can capitalize on the meeting and Pope Francis' visit, which are expected to draw up to 2 million people and generate nearly $418 million in economic impact.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
PAT DUNLEAVY was getting some medical tests last December and, for no particular reason, his wife, Alice, said, "He never got his Bronze Star. " Pat Dunleavy, an Army combat veteran of some of the toughest fighting in the South Pacific in World War II, rarely spoke about his experiences. So, it was a surprise to his son-in-law, William O'Donnell, that there were missing commendations. When he asked Pat about it, he got an even bigger suprise. "Billy," Pat said, "they owe me four Bronze Stars.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
RAY BONINA couldn't even walk on a beach in Mexico without someone calling out, "Hey, Ray!" And probably adding, "Remember me?" "To Ray, strangers were simply friends he had not yet met," his family said. In fact, it was kind of a family joke that Ray Bonina couldn't go anywhere without running into someone he knew, from that beach in Mexico to a street in New York City or a restaurant in Chicago. "Hey, Ray, remember me?" Raymond Joseph Bonina, retired president of the Garrett Buchanan Paper Co., passionate ice-hockey fan, active alumnus of St. Joseph's University and devoted family man, died Saturday.
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JUSTIN GIANI had a head for figures. But along with his proficiency with numbers, Justin was a friendly, cheerful colleague with a contagious smile who charmed everyone who came in contact with him. Justin was the chief financial officer of Breaking Glass Pictures, a Philadelphia-based film distribution company. "Justin was more than an employee," the company said in a statement. "He was a master of numbers, a ball of energy, an even-keeled ray of light that brought smiles to all he crossed paths with, no matter the situation.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Days before a New Jersey drinking-water panel is set to discuss a possible regulation for a contaminant found in Gloucester County water supplies, the plastics company suspected of emitting the chemical placed a full-page newspaper advertisement raising the specter of other potential sources. A main takeaway of Solvay Specialty Polymer's Thursday ad: A "voluntary and extensive" investigation over the last year shows there are "multiple sources in the region" that might be responsible.
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