CollectionsCompanies
IN THE NEWS

Companies

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Berwyn and Paoli Fire Company officials agreed Tuesday to let Chester County's 911 task force decide for them the most efficient service boundaries for the two companies. The agreement, reached at a meeting with Tredyffrin Township officials, ends a longstanding dispute over which volunteer company could better serve certain areas in Tredyffrin. The dispute focused particularly on the Chesterbrook development of 2,392 homes and dozens of businesses now in the Berwyn company's service territory.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Bean's business depends on tragedy. Tuesday's earthquake in Northern California and last month's hurricane in South Carolina are the stuff on which his Evans American Corp. thrives. Founded eight years ago in Houston by his father, the company specializes in catastrophe management - helping companies rebuild their crumbled facilities far more quickly than normal. "I don't know anybody who does exactly what we do," said Bean, president of the company. "I know people who rebuild damaged buildings, but we fit into a niche market inside of a niche market.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareholders had their say on pay in a big way at public companies this year. But anyone expecting widespread revolt over the big sums that many executives earned was probably disappointed. Just 37 of 2,293 companies whose shareholders had voted on compensation practices as of June 21 had failed to receive at least 50 percent of the shares voted in favor of those practices, according to Semler Brossy Consulting Group L.L.C. , a Princeton compensation consulting firm.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The companies headed by Nicholas Schorsch have bought more than $10 billion worth of hotels, clinics, stores, apartments, stockbrokerages, and investment funds across the United States, doubling their collective size. And that's just so far this year. "This is not growth for growth's sake," the fast-moving, solidly built Schorsch, 52, insisted in a conference call with investors Thursday. Rather, he said, "it is an all-out effort to gain competitive advantage" by growing so big that the group can buy and sell assets more cheaply.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frustrated by a large number of small, fraudulent competitors, two of the largest Philadelphia-area ambulance operators recently joined forces. "The last couple of years have been really difficult for both companies. It's a very tough market," said Steve Barr, president and chief executive of Keystone Quality Transport Co., which has taken over the management of rival EMStar L.L.C. Company officials described the deal - which took effect Feb. 9, shortly after federal regulators launched an intensified crackdown on ambulance fraud in the Philadelphia region - as an alliance rather than a merger of the two privately owned medical transportation companies.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I TRACE MY roots back to 1862 (yes, during the Civil War) and railway legislation signed by Abraham Lincoln. Based in Omaha, I'm a top American transportation enterprise, with a railroad network spanning 23 states (mainly in the West) and more than 30,000 miles. I employ more than 40,000 people, use more than 8,000 locomotives and rake in more than $20 billion annually as I serve about 10,000 customers. My biggest customers include steamship lines, vehicle manufacturers, agricultural companies, utilities, intermodal companies and chemical manufacturers.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Ten Bucks County companies earned places on the Philadelphia 100, an annual list of fast-growing, privately held small companies in the Delaware Valley. "This year's companies are smaller than last year, more highly focused and probably have better long-term prospects," said David Thornburgh, director of the Wharton Small Business Development Center and manager of the project. "These are companies that have better defined their niche and have served those markets. They haven't had a strong economy to benefit from.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Bill Madway decided to take his own advice. After helping hundreds of people start their own companies, Madway started a research firm specializing in helping businesses buy and sell. "Research can help a company plan for the future by finding strengths and weaknesses and what the demand is for the company's product or service," Madway said. "The key is gathering information.. . . In a recession like the one we are in now, companies have to be more cautious about how they spend their money.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
E. Walter Karkut, 78, who owned and operated mailing and marketing companies before he retired, died Monday at his Abington home. A native of Harrisville, R.I., Mr. Karkut was raised in Fulton, N.Y. He enlisted in the Army before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, and he graduated from Officer Candidate School before he served in the Signal Corps. He had attained the rank of captain before his five-year hitch ended. Mr. Karkut was employed for 11 years by Mailing Service Inc. and left in 1958 as managing director to form Modern Mailers Inc. in Northeast Philadelphia.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
A visionary, hard-driving salesman, Ralph Roberts turned an obscure subscriber television station in Tupelo, Miss., into a communications empire, with dominant cable, Internet, and entertainment services. Although a global leader, Comcast has stayed true to its Philadelphia roots, becoming the largest company headquartered in the city. With its own office tower in Center City and a second one on the way, Comcast has almost 140,000 employees and more than $68 billion in revenue. Roberts, who died Thursday at 95, built the communications giant on the foresight to acquire cable television companies around the nation.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE CONTROVERSIAL parcel of land for which the Nutter administration wants to pay more than $7.2 million was once the site of a scrap-metal firm that dismantled a ship exposed to atomic-bomb tests in the Marshall Islands after World War II, the Daily News has learned. The USS Niagara, a wartime naval-transport ship, in July 1946 became a "target ship" in Operation Crossroads, in which the U.S. conducted atomic-bomb tests "using nuclear devices very similar to the one dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, in August 1945," according to a document obtained from the U.S. Defense Department's Defense Threat Reduction Agency.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EVEN WHEN GERALDINE Smith went to work at a distribution company that did not require fashion attire, she always was stylishly turned out. Why, when she only had to change into work clothes when she arrived? She had a simple explanation: "My mother always said to all of us kids growing up, when you go to work, you should always be dressed for the next position higher than you, or the position you want to aspire to be in. That way, the employer can see you in that position. " These were motherly words of wisdom to which Gerry Smith always adhered, and which won her praise on the job for her diligence and work ethic, as well as her fashion sense.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Allison Steele and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
The New Jersey Economic Development Authority approved $164 million in tax credits Tuesday for Voorhees-based American Water Works to encourage the company to relocate to Camden. If American Water Works takes the deal, the company would consolidate current offices in Mount Laurel, Voorhees, Cherry Hill, and Haddon Heights in a new facility to be built in the Gateway District, near Campbell Soup Co. and the future site of Subaru Corp. of America, which last year announced plans to move from Cherry Hill.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Staff Writer
What Apple doesn't invent, it polishes. That's the strategy with the new Apple Music and Apple News, plus the upgraded Apple Pay, WatchOS, and iOS9 operating system. All were highlighted at the tech giant's Worldwide Developers Conference presentation Monday. Apple Music - given the "one more thing" closing slot on the program, reserved for the most important news - is the company's second swing at a subscription service. Such services are one of the only growth areas in the prerecorded music business.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Radio 104.5 FM threw a summer block party three weeks before the official start of the season on Sunday at Festival Pier. It had all the makings of a good street fair. It was free (station fans had to register for tickets). There were cold brews, grilled food, party games like beer pong, and teens lying around in shorts. And there were cool kid-indie bands as the long afternoon's sound track. The Oxford, England, alt-rock unit A Silent Film was the headliner - a good, not entirely contagious act. Entering to the sound of swarming bees, military drum riffs, and the splintered synths of "Tomorrow," A Silent Film was reminiscent of Psychedelic Furs toward the end of the '80s - a spooky but overly slick brand of sinister new wave.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp.'s customer service satisfaction grade for television and Internet services slipped from a year ago and remains among the worst of all U.S. brands and services, according to the 2015 American Customer Satisfaction Index to be released Tuesday. Over the last year, the satisfaction score for Comcast's TV service declined 10 percent - steeper than the average 3.1 percent decline for the telecommunications industry - to 54. Satisfaction with Comcast's Internet service fell 2 percent, to a score of 56 - the lowest in the sector in the new report.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
A funny thing happened on the way to the 21st century: The definition and importance of marriage shifted, gayness came out of the shadows and proliferated in public, pop cultural, and political life, and Stephen Sondheim and George Furth's Company turned into a period piece. Bucks County Playhouse's current production brings out the bright side of single-and-searching 35-year-old Bobby-baby-bubi and his well-intentioned married friends. But not even the casting of Bucks County celeb Justin Guarini in that central role can mask the fact that the time may have passed for this version of the show.
NEWS
May 27, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EVER SINCE he drove a school bus in his native North Carolina, Joe Davis just loved getting behind the wheel of a big vehicle. When he came to Philadelphia, he switched from buses to trucks, and eventually started his own trucking company, hauling just about anything that could be hauled, including hazardous materials. Joe also could be called on to help out wherever needed, including his church and his community. You never heard Joe Davis turn down a request to be of service to others.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Mabin Sr. has worked on railroad equipment for four decades. He's never fulfilled an order like the one he received Thursday. Following the crash of Amtrak Train 188, the agency needed two new catenary portal structures at Frankford Junction to get its Northeast Corridor service operational again. The tall steel structures hold the overhead wires above rail lines. Each one requires about 15 tons of metal. Typically, they take at least six weeks to create. Amtrak asked Mabin if his company could build two in three days.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|