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NEWS
September 18, 2014
T ESS MICHAELS, 20, of University City, is a social entrepreneur and a Penn senior pursuing a dual degree in management and life sciences. The Philly native is the founder and CEO of Soceana, a startup that launched in January with tech-enabled platforms to generate social good. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Soceana? A: I volunteered a lot in high school and saw a need for a unique approach. At Wharton, I found that the corporate space was an effective way to bridge volunteerism with philanthropy.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frustrated by a large number of small, fraudulent competitors, two of the largest Philadelphia-area ambulance operators recently joined forces. "The last couple of years have been really difficult for both companies. It's a very tough market," said Steve Barr, president and chief executive of Keystone Quality Transport Co., which has taken over the management of rival EMStar L.L.C. Company officials described the deal - which took effect Feb. 9, shortly after federal regulators launched an intensified crackdown on ambulance fraud in the Philadelphia region - as an alliance rather than a merger of the two privately owned medical transportation companies.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Berwyn and Paoli Fire Company officials agreed Tuesday to let Chester County's 911 task force decide for them the most efficient service boundaries for the two companies. The agreement, reached at a meeting with Tredyffrin Township officials, ends a longstanding dispute over which volunteer company could better serve certain areas in Tredyffrin. The dispute focused particularly on the Chesterbrook development of 2,392 homes and dozens of businesses now in the Berwyn company's service territory.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The companies headed by Nicholas Schorsch have bought more than $10 billion worth of hotels, clinics, stores, apartments, stockbrokerages, and investment funds across the United States, doubling their collective size. And that's just so far this year. "This is not growth for growth's sake," the fast-moving, solidly built Schorsch, 52, insisted in a conference call with investors Thursday. Rather, he said, "it is an all-out effort to gain competitive advantage" by growing so big that the group can buy and sell assets more cheaply.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Bean's business depends on tragedy. Tuesday's earthquake in Northern California and last month's hurricane in South Carolina are the stuff on which his Evans American Corp. thrives. Founded eight years ago in Houston by his father, the company specializes in catastrophe management - helping companies rebuild their crumbled facilities far more quickly than normal. "I don't know anybody who does exactly what we do," said Bean, president of the company. "I know people who rebuild damaged buildings, but we fit into a niche market inside of a niche market.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareholders had their say on pay in a big way at public companies this year. But anyone expecting widespread revolt over the big sums that many executives earned was probably disappointed. Just 37 of 2,293 companies whose shareholders had voted on compensation practices as of June 21 had failed to receive at least 50 percent of the shares voted in favor of those practices, according to Semler Brossy Consulting Group L.L.C. , a Princeton compensation consulting firm.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I TRACE MY roots back to 1862 (yes, during the Civil War) and railway legislation signed by Abraham Lincoln. Based in Omaha, I'm a top American transportation enterprise, with a railroad network spanning 23 states (mainly in the West) and more than 30,000 miles. I employ more than 40,000 people, use more than 8,000 locomotives and rake in more than $20 billion annually as I serve about 10,000 customers. My biggest customers include steamship lines, vehicle manufacturers, agricultural companies, utilities, intermodal companies and chemical manufacturers.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Ten Bucks County companies earned places on the Philadelphia 100, an annual list of fast-growing, privately held small companies in the Delaware Valley. "This year's companies are smaller than last year, more highly focused and probably have better long-term prospects," said David Thornburgh, director of the Wharton Small Business Development Center and manager of the project. "These are companies that have better defined their niche and have served those markets. They haven't had a strong economy to benefit from.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Bill Madway decided to take his own advice. After helping hundreds of people start their own companies, Madway started a research firm specializing in helping businesses buy and sell. "Research can help a company plan for the future by finding strengths and weaknesses and what the demand is for the company's product or service," Madway said. "The key is gathering information.. . . In a recession like the one we are in now, companies have to be more cautious about how they spend their money.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William T. Pfeffer, 65, of Somerdale, who owned and operated Chatham Communications, a telephone services firm in Bellmawr, from 1981 until it was sold in 2007, died of Parkinson's disease Thursday, Oct. 16, at his home. Born in Camden, Mr. Pfeffer graduated from Collingswood High School in 1967, where he won medals while on the wrestling team, daughter Jennifer Campbell said. After serving in the Navy, Mr. Pfeffer was a lineman for New Jersey Bell Telephone Co. in the 1970s, she said.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alice McGlynn Moran, 98, of Ocean City, president of Marine Services Group in Philadelphia and Marcus Hook, died Monday, Oct. 6, at home. The firm provides transportation for people and goods from Shore points to ships anchored in the Delaware River, from the Delaware Bay to Morrisville, a son, James, said. Mrs. Moran's husband, William J. Moran II, died in 1974 and, since 1976, Mrs. Moran had shared ownership of the firm with sons William J. III, the corporate secretary, and James, the corporate treasurer, he said.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
AS PRINCIPAL of Universal Bluford Charter School, Crystal Gary-Nelson saw about 6 percent of her students missing daily last year. That's a pretty low number, but one she wants to improve upon. The issue, she said, was not so much truancy, but sickness. "For us, if I can just keep my scholars in school healthy, that's a bonus for us," the second-year principal said. One of the problems is "kids being sick for a prolonged period of time and it going untreated. " To help address the issue, the West Philadelphia school and the seven other schools run by Universal Companies now have a full-scale health center, a hybrid between a school nurse and a doctor's office.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The treasurer of a Chester County fire company was charged Wednesday with stealing $300,000 from the station by forging checks, stealing from the firehouse safe, and manipulating bingo records. Hower Smith III, 57, allegedly stole the money from Coatesville's Westwood Fire Company between 2006 and 2012. Smith, who lives in Coatesville and was a member of the company for about 40 years, was removed from his post and came under investigation in 2012 after he charged $2,000 to a fire company credit card while on vacation in Hawaii, officials said.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sundance Vacations had a problem. Unhappy customers weren't just complaining to consumer agencies or regulators, where it was used to quietly settling or pushing back. Instead, many were connecting on Facebook - finding a "Boycott Sundance Vacations" page whose 2,200 thumbs-ups might as well be thumbs-downs. Today, a prospective customer who types "Sundance Vacations" into a search engine such as Google is likely to find the boycott page, managed by a group of activist critics, near the top of the results.
NEWS
October 4, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert P. Thompson, 94, of Huntingdon Valley, a lumber company owner who traveled the world in search of exotic hardwoods to be made into high-end products, died Wednesday, Sept. 24, of heart failure at Abington Memorial Hospital. Mr. Thompson spent his entire career as president of Thompson Mahogany Co., the Philadelphia firm started by his great-grandfather in 1843. Beginning in 1946 and until retiring in the mid-1990s, he traveled to Africa and South America seeking out mahogany and arranging for it to be shipped into the ports of Philadelphia and Camden.
SPORTS
October 3, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J. - Brett Brown isn't so much into comparing as he is looking at models. Before becoming the 76ers head coach he came from the ultimate NBA mold in San Antonio, so having the names of Duncan and Ginobili and Parker roll off his tongue is common. When talking about Ronald Roberts, the athletically gifted jumper out of Saint Joseph's, Brown doesn't go back to someone he has coached in the past, rather he looks to a current budding star. Roberts opened eyes, and mouths, with his performances for the Sixers in the Orlando Summer League.
BUSINESS
September 29, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Atlantic City casino hotels went bankrupt in the past - no uncommon occurrence - suppliers could count on getting 60 percent to 80 percent of what they were owed. Like much else in Atlantic City, that has changed. "There's no reason to believe we'll ever get very much of it at all," said Nelson Dilg, whose Egg Harbor City, N.J., company cleans kitchen hoods and grease traps, and has experienced earlier rounds of casino bankruptcies. The Atlantic Club, Revel AC Inc., and Trump Entertainment Resorts Inc., the three Atlantic City casino operators that have filed for bankruptcy protection since last November, owe Dilg's Nelbud Services Group Inc. $200,000.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp., seeking to counter sharp opposition from thousands of customers, consumer advocates, and competitors to its proposed $45.2 billion takeover of Time Warner Cable Inc., once again urged the Federal Communications Commission to approve a deal that would cement Comcast's status as the nation's largest cable-TV and broadband Internet provider. In comments submitted late Tuesday to the FCC, Comcast said the acquisition offered a broad range of benefits both to the combined companies' 30-million-plus customers as well as "to individuals, businesses, institutions, and community organizations across the nation," despite criticism from many of the about 65,000 who voiced opinions to the agency before last month's deadline.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
T ESS MICHAELS, 20, of University City, is a social entrepreneur and a Penn senior pursuing a dual degree in management and life sciences. The Philly native is the founder and CEO of Soceana, a startup that launched in January with tech-enabled platforms to generate social good. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Soceana? A: I volunteered a lot in high school and saw a need for a unique approach. At Wharton, I found that the corporate space was an effective way to bridge volunteerism with philanthropy.
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