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BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareholders had their say on pay in a big way at public companies this year. But anyone expecting widespread revolt over the big sums that many executives earned was probably disappointed. Just 37 of 2,293 companies whose shareholders had voted on compensation practices as of June 21 had failed to receive at least 50 percent of the shares voted in favor of those practices, according to Semler Brossy Consulting Group L.L.C. , a Princeton compensation consulting firm.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Berwyn and Paoli Fire Company officials agreed Tuesday to let Chester County's 911 task force decide for them the most efficient service boundaries for the two companies. The agreement, reached at a meeting with Tredyffrin Township officials, ends a longstanding dispute over which volunteer company could better serve certain areas in Tredyffrin. The dispute focused particularly on the Chesterbrook development of 2,392 homes and dozens of businesses now in the Berwyn company's service territory.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Bean's business depends on tragedy. Tuesday's earthquake in Northern California and last month's hurricane in South Carolina are the stuff on which his Evans American Corp. thrives. Founded eight years ago in Houston by his father, the company specializes in catastrophe management - helping companies rebuild their crumbled facilities far more quickly than normal. "I don't know anybody who does exactly what we do," said Bean, president of the company. "I know people who rebuild damaged buildings, but we fit into a niche market inside of a niche market.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The companies headed by Nicholas Schorsch have bought more than $10 billion worth of hotels, clinics, stores, apartments, stockbrokerages, and investment funds across the United States, doubling their collective size. And that's just so far this year. "This is not growth for growth's sake," the fast-moving, solidly built Schorsch, 52, insisted in a conference call with investors Thursday. Rather, he said, "it is an all-out effort to gain competitive advantage" by growing so big that the group can buy and sell assets more cheaply.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frustrated by a large number of small, fraudulent competitors, two of the largest Philadelphia-area ambulance operators recently joined forces. "The last couple of years have been really difficult for both companies. It's a very tough market," said Steve Barr, president and chief executive of Keystone Quality Transport Co., which has taken over the management of rival EMStar L.L.C. Company officials described the deal - which took effect Feb. 9, shortly after federal regulators launched an intensified crackdown on ambulance fraud in the Philadelphia region - as an alliance rather than a merger of the two privately owned medical transportation companies.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I TRACE MY roots back to 1862 (yes, during the Civil War) and railway legislation signed by Abraham Lincoln. Based in Omaha, I'm a top American transportation enterprise, with a railroad network spanning 23 states (mainly in the West) and more than 30,000 miles. I employ more than 40,000 people, use more than 8,000 locomotives and rake in more than $20 billion annually as I serve about 10,000 customers. My biggest customers include steamship lines, vehicle manufacturers, agricultural companies, utilities, intermodal companies and chemical manufacturers.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Ten Bucks County companies earned places on the Philadelphia 100, an annual list of fast-growing, privately held small companies in the Delaware Valley. "This year's companies are smaller than last year, more highly focused and probably have better long-term prospects," said David Thornburgh, director of the Wharton Small Business Development Center and manager of the project. "These are companies that have better defined their niche and have served those markets. They haven't had a strong economy to benefit from.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Bill Madway decided to take his own advice. After helping hundreds of people start their own companies, Madway started a research firm specializing in helping businesses buy and sell. "Research can help a company plan for the future by finding strengths and weaknesses and what the demand is for the company's product or service," Madway said. "The key is gathering information.. . . In a recession like the one we are in now, companies have to be more cautious about how they spend their money.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
E. Walter Karkut, 78, who owned and operated mailing and marketing companies before he retired, died Monday at his Abington home. A native of Harrisville, R.I., Mr. Karkut was raised in Fulton, N.Y. He enlisted in the Army before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, and he graduated from Officer Candidate School before he served in the Signal Corps. He had attained the rank of captain before his five-year hitch ended. Mr. Karkut was employed for 11 years by Mailing Service Inc. and left in 1958 as managing director to form Modern Mailers Inc. in Northeast Philadelphia.
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NEWS
April 10, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JUSTIN GIANI had a head for figures. But along with his proficiency with numbers, Justin was a friendly, cheerful colleague with a contagious smile who charmed everyone who came in contact with him. Justin was the chief financial officer of Breaking Glass Pictures, a Philadelphia-based film distribution company. "Justin was more than an employee," the company said in a statement. "He was a master of numbers, a ball of energy, an even-keeled ray of light that brought smiles to all he crossed paths with, no matter the situation.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts has signed on a new resident company. The Curtis Institute of Music joined the roster effective Wednesday, making it the Kimmel's first new resident company since its opening in December 2001. As far as the listening public is concerned, little will change with the start of the five-year contract. Curtis ensembles have performed at the Kimmel from the start - its orchestra in Verizon Hall and operas in the Perelman Theater. But as a resident company, Curtis will receive breaks on rental fees and priority scheduling, and will be featured in Kimmel marketing and advertising.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Days before a New Jersey drinking-water panel is set to discuss a possible regulation for a contaminant found in Gloucester County water supplies, the plastics company suspected of emitting the chemical placed a full-page newspaper advertisement raising the specter of other potential sources. A main takeaway of Solvay Specialty Polymer's Thursday ad: A "voluntary and extensive" investigation over the last year shows there are "multiple sources in the region" that might be responsible.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Angelakis, 50, the Comcast Corp. executive who headed the negotiations for NBCUniversal and Time Warner Cable Inc., will resign his posts as chief financial officer and vice chairman to lead a new Comcast-controlled $4.1 billion investment arm. The new venture, which Comcast calls a "strategic company," would be one of the biggest funds of its kind in Pennsylvania and will be looking for high-return investments like one Comcast made into...
NEWS
April 2, 2015
IMAGINE YOU and a fellow worker were fired because you "liked" a Facebook post by a former co-worker. The post criticized the employer for allegedly making mistakes on their W-2s resulting in the worker owing additional state income tax. That's just one of several cases that may come up for discussion at a Philadelphia Society for Human Resource Management seminar here today and tomorrow. The case, which went before the National Labor Relations Board and was decided on Aug. 22, involved a waitress and a cook at Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille in Waterbury, Conn.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dave Clarke, manufacturing director at a Kulpsville company, tried to capture the attention of teenagers as they walked through a hallway of Souderdon Area High School, which was lined with tables of other manufacturers trying to do the same. Clarke came to Montgomery County's second annual ManuFest on Saturday because his company, which develops products for such industries as aerospace, oil fields, and solar, wants to develop talent early and put manufacturing on the radar of high school students.
NEWS
March 29, 2015 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
It's hard to believe that Koresh Dance Company has been performing on Philadelphia boards for almost 25 years. Harder still to think that Melissa Rector is still shining in every performance as she has since 1991. And hardest of all not to be moved by Aftershock , artistic director and founder Ronen Koresh's love letter to his adoptive homeland. It opened the company's spring run at the Suzanne Roberts Theatre on Thursday night. Aftershock is episodic, deriving perhaps from Koresh's biography.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lone demolition company still under contract to perform some work as part of Camden's large-scale demolition project backed out of the agreement Thursday, according to the city. Burlington County-based Winzinger Inc. had been awarded the contract to raze 101 buildings as part of the city's planned demolition of almost 600 abandoned and dilapidated properties. But after numerous problems arose with contracts issued in the bidding process, city officials asked the Camden County Improvement Authority to take control of the project earlier this month.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia home health care company indicted for Medicaid fraud in early February has ceased operations, costing 1,324 people their jobs - the largest of several recent layoffs in Southeastern Pennsylvania. Infinite Care Inc. filed a required notice with the commonwealth's Department of Labor and Industry that it would close its facility on Rising Sun Avenue. A letter dated March 4 mentioned "unforeseen business circumstances" related to the state health department's ordering the company to cease operations.
NEWS
March 18, 2015 | Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two documentaries by Sam Katz's Emmy-winning production company will capture Pope Francis' visit to Philadelphia - and the months of behind-the-scenes preparation leading up to it. The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced Monday that it is commissioning Katz's History Making Productions to create two documentaries. The first will feature the lead-up to Francis' visit and the World Meeting of Families, an international Catholic conference being held in Philadelphia from Sept. 22 to 25. The second will focus on Francis' two-day stay that Saturday and Sunday.
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