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BUSINESS
May 20, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
German supermarket giant Lidl is building up a real estate team in Philadelphia, establishing the city and environs as a beachhead in its aggressive U.S. expansion, the company's first foray outside Europe. The discount chain, a unit of the Schwarz Group grocery conglomerate, is seeking an acquisition manager and three other real estate staffers in the city, according to its U.S. website. Another acquisition manager is being sought in Pittsburgh, while more than a hundred additional slots are open - for jobs ranging from store managers to human-resources personnel - in a strip of East Coast states between Virginia, where Lidl U.S. is headquartered in Arlington, and Georgia.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
NEWS
December 13, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dow Chemical Co. and the DuPont Co. said Friday that they would combine in a "tax-free merger" into one company, DowDuPont, and then split into three separate firms. They plan to cut at least $3 billion in yearly expenses, shut offices and plants, and lay off thousands of workers, in the hope of driving up share prices and enriching investors. DuPont, based in Wilmington, also said Friday that even before the merger, it will displace around 5,400 of its 54,000 global employees.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2016
The amount spent by pharmaceutical firms, medical-device manufacturers, and other life-sciences companies for the regulatory guidance to move products to market is estimated at a staggering $20 billion to $30 billion a year. Time spent on the work is typically a big number, too - more accurately measured in months, not minutes. In that, Priya Bhutani saw business opportunity. She launched RegDesk in November 2014 to provide, in part, a marketplace to crowd-source regulatory consultants who would help medical-device and pharma companies launch their devices and drugs faster in more than 170 countries.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frustrated by a large number of small, fraudulent competitors, two of the largest Philadelphia-area ambulance operators recently joined forces. "The last couple of years have been really difficult for both companies. It's a very tough market," said Steve Barr, president and chief executive of Keystone Quality Transport Co., which has taken over the management of rival EMStar L.L.C. Company officials described the deal - which took effect Feb. 9, shortly after federal regulators launched an intensified crackdown on ambulance fraud in the Philadelphia region - as an alliance rather than a merger of the two privately owned medical transportation companies.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Berwyn and Paoli Fire Company officials agreed Tuesday to let Chester County's 911 task force decide for them the most efficient service boundaries for the two companies. The agreement, reached at a meeting with Tredyffrin Township officials, ends a longstanding dispute over which volunteer company could better serve certain areas in Tredyffrin. The dispute focused particularly on the Chesterbrook development of 2,392 homes and dozens of businesses now in the Berwyn company's service territory.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareholders had their say on pay in a big way at public companies this year. But anyone expecting widespread revolt over the big sums that many executives earned was probably disappointed. Just 37 of 2,293 companies whose shareholders had voted on compensation practices as of June 21 had failed to receive at least 50 percent of the shares voted in favor of those practices, according to Semler Brossy Consulting Group L.L.C. , a Princeton compensation consulting firm.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Bean's business depends on tragedy. Tuesday's earthquake in Northern California and last month's hurricane in South Carolina are the stuff on which his Evans American Corp. thrives. Founded eight years ago in Houston by his father, the company specializes in catastrophe management - helping companies rebuild their crumbled facilities far more quickly than normal. "I don't know anybody who does exactly what we do," said Bean, president of the company. "I know people who rebuild damaged buildings, but we fit into a niche market inside of a niche market.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I TRACE MY roots back to 1862 (yes, during the Civil War) and railway legislation signed by Abraham Lincoln. Based in Omaha, I'm a top American transportation enterprise, with a railroad network spanning 23 states (mainly in the West) and more than 30,000 miles. I employ more than 40,000 people, use more than 8,000 locomotives and rake in more than $20 billion annually as I serve about 10,000 customers. My biggest customers include steamship lines, vehicle manufacturers, agricultural companies, utilities, intermodal companies and chemical manufacturers.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Ten Bucks County companies earned places on the Philadelphia 100, an annual list of fast-growing, privately held small companies in the Delaware Valley. "This year's companies are smaller than last year, more highly focused and probably have better long-term prospects," said David Thornburgh, director of the Wharton Small Business Development Center and manager of the project. "These are companies that have better defined their niche and have served those markets. They haven't had a strong economy to benefit from.
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NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie offered his "unequivocal" support for Israel on Tuesday, signing into law legislation that prohibits the state Treasury Department from investing public employee pension funds in companies that boycott the U.S. ally. The law is a rejection of the "boycott, divestment, and sanctions" movement against Israel that Palestinians and other supporters launched a decade ago to, as the movement puts it, "pressure Israel to comply with international law. " "Unequivocal, unashamed, unapologetic support of Israel is the policy of the State of New Jersey - and should be the policy of the United States of America, and hopefully will be in the years going forward," Christie, a Republican, said at a Statehouse news conference.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, Staff Writer
Ray Croce Sr. will take the reins as interim artistic director of the South Camden Theatre Company, a nonprofit professional theater organization, the company's board of trustees announced Friday. Croce, 58, of Cherry Hill - who works full time as a medical dosimetrist at Cancer Treatment Centers of America's Eastern Regional Medical Center in Philadelphia - replaces Joe Paprzycki, who stepped down from the unpaid position in June due to artistic differences with the company's board.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
Conflict between two prominent Philadelphia taxi medallion owners has caused more than 100 drivers to go without work for weeks - some for months - according to drivers' accounts. Evgeny Freidman and Everett Abitbol own Freedom Taxi Association L.L.C., but a pending lawsuit seeks to change that. In a complaint filed in Common Pleas Court in April, Abitbol asked to dissolve the company, and accused him of removing business funds to pay personal debts and setting up ghost accounts to send money to family members, among other claims.
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, STAFF WRITER
A Marlton home improvement company has been charged by the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs with consumer fraud for taking deposits from customers and then failing to perform the work, and for misrepresenting the work that needed to be done. A six-count complaint was filed in Superior Court in Burlington County against Majestic Home Remodeling and its owner, Wisam Emachah, who operated under Daruwe Corp. The company was based in Marlton but also had offices in West Berlin, Camden County.
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
Solvay Specialty Polymers, a plastics company linked to contaminated water in several Gloucester County towns, was fined $115,000 this week by the federal workplace safety agency for exposing employees to flammable gas, among other charges. During a scheduled inspection of the company's West Deptford facilities this February, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration found three repeat and eight serious violations, including several violations of process safety management regulations, the agency announced Thursday.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
In May 1979, Domenic Giancaterino Jr. decided to make his two-person engagement dinner to Evelyn Edgerly special, the way a jeweler such as he might. Before leaving for a South Philadelphia restaurant, "I gave her a ring that I knew she would not like," too insignificant, he said. But by the time they arrived at the restaurant, he recalled, "she had talked herself into liking it. " While having a drink before dinner, she put the ring onto a drink's olive, to show it off to him. But, Giancaterino said, he took the olive and "pulled out the real ring, put it on the olive, and gave it back to her - a carat-and-a-half round diamond.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
GlaxoSmithKline is teaming up with Verily Life Sciences L.L.C. in the San Francisco Bay area to form a new company to develop "bioelectronic" medicines that use electrical signals in the body to treat chronic diseases. Verily, formerly Google Life Sciences and a wholly owned subsidiary of Alphabet Inc., said Monday that the collaboration presents a "possible new way" of providing therapy to patients. Bioelectronic medicine is a relatively new scientific field that uses miniature implantable devices in the body to modify electrical signals that pass along nerves, including irregular or altered impulses that occur in many illnesses.
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
The first volunteer has received a dose of Inovio Pharmaceuticals' experimental vaccine to combat the Zika virus, the Plymouth meeting biotech company said Tuesday. Inovio is developing its Zika vaccine with partner GeneOne Life Science in South Korea. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Health Canada's Health Products and Food Branch have approved early-stage tests in 40 healthy adults, the company said. The tests will be done in Philadelphia, Miami, and Quebec City, and will evaluate safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of the vaccine against the mosquito-borne virus.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Liberty Property Trust is under agreement to sell much of its holdings in the Great Valley Corporate Center, the pioneering Chester County business park that transformed Malvern and made the developer into a major regional office landlord. The company is selling 26 Great Valley properties, accounting for more than a million square feet of office and light-industrial space, to Horsham-based Workspace Property Trust, Liberty announced Monday. The properties are part of a $969 million deal covering 7.6 million square feet across 108 suburban properties in Pennsylvania, Arizona, Florida, and Minnesota, Liberty said.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
With mass-market U.S. chocolate consumption on the wane and millennial tastes trending toward health-conscious snacks, the Hershey Co. chocolate giant faces a challenging future, analysts say. While the central Pennsylvania company has been developing new product lines, its "category has been declining with the changing tastes of millennials," said Jack Russo, senior consumer staples analyst with Edward Jones. "Snacking is taking a different form, more protein" - energy bars, jerky, and fruits and nuts.
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