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BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frustrated by a large number of small, fraudulent competitors, two of the largest Philadelphia-area ambulance operators recently joined forces. "The last couple of years have been really difficult for both companies. It's a very tough market," said Steve Barr, president and chief executive of Keystone Quality Transport Co., which has taken over the management of rival EMStar L.L.C. Company officials described the deal - which took effect Feb. 9, shortly after federal regulators launched an intensified crackdown on ambulance fraud in the Philadelphia region - as an alliance rather than a merger of the two privately owned medical transportation companies.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Juliana Reyes, It's Our Money Writer
WHEN IT comes to large vacant buildings, developer Tony Rufo knows how to spot potential. More than a year ago, Rufo transformed the shuttered Nathaniel Hawthorne School into the Hawthorne Lofts: 53 units of luxury loft-style condominiums. The development offers floor-to-ceiling windows, a roof deck with a stunning view of Center City and ultra-low taxes thanks to a 10-year tax break from the city. According to Rufo's website, every unit has sold. But 2 miles south, just around the corner from South Philadelphia High School, sits a very different kind of Rufo property.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Berwyn and Paoli Fire Company officials agreed Tuesday to let Chester County's 911 task force decide for them the most efficient service boundaries for the two companies. The agreement, reached at a meeting with Tredyffrin Township officials, ends a longstanding dispute over which volunteer company could better serve certain areas in Tredyffrin. The dispute focused particularly on the Chesterbrook development of 2,392 homes and dozens of businesses now in the Berwyn company's service territory.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Bean's business depends on tragedy. Tuesday's earthquake in Northern California and last month's hurricane in South Carolina are the stuff on which his Evans American Corp. thrives. Founded eight years ago in Houston by his father, the company specializes in catastrophe management - helping companies rebuild their crumbled facilities far more quickly than normal. "I don't know anybody who does exactly what we do," said Bean, president of the company. "I know people who rebuild damaged buildings, but we fit into a niche market inside of a niche market.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareholders had their say on pay in a big way at public companies this year. But anyone expecting widespread revolt over the big sums that many executives earned was probably disappointed. Just 37 of 2,293 companies whose shareholders had voted on compensation practices as of June 21 had failed to receive at least 50 percent of the shares voted in favor of those practices, according to Semler Brossy Consulting Group L.L.C. , a Princeton compensation consulting firm.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The companies headed by Nicholas Schorsch have bought more than $10 billion worth of hotels, clinics, stores, apartments, stockbrokerages, and investment funds across the United States, doubling their collective size. And that's just so far this year. "This is not growth for growth's sake," the fast-moving, solidly built Schorsch, 52, insisted in a conference call with investors Thursday. Rather, he said, "it is an all-out effort to gain competitive advantage" by growing so big that the group can buy and sell assets more cheaply.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I TRACE MY roots back to 1862 (yes, during the Civil War) and railway legislation signed by Abraham Lincoln. Based in Omaha, I'm a top American transportation enterprise, with a railroad network spanning 23 states (mainly in the West) and more than 30,000 miles. I employ more than 40,000 people, use more than 8,000 locomotives and rake in more than $20 billion annually as I serve about 10,000 customers. My biggest customers include steamship lines, vehicle manufacturers, agricultural companies, utilities, intermodal companies and chemical manufacturers.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Ten Bucks County companies earned places on the Philadelphia 100, an annual list of fast-growing, privately held small companies in the Delaware Valley. "This year's companies are smaller than last year, more highly focused and probably have better long-term prospects," said David Thornburgh, director of the Wharton Small Business Development Center and manager of the project. "These are companies that have better defined their niche and have served those markets. They haven't had a strong economy to benefit from.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Bill Madway decided to take his own advice. After helping hundreds of people start their own companies, Madway started a research firm specializing in helping businesses buy and sell. "Research can help a company plan for the future by finding strengths and weaknesses and what the demand is for the company's product or service," Madway said. "The key is gathering information.. . . In a recession like the one we are in now, companies have to be more cautious about how they spend their money.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 30, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the region's deteriorating bridges and ailing train stations is lucrative opportunity for a niche of businesses also in need of a helping hand: small, minority, and female contractors. SEPTA is trying to play matchmaker. With the agency planning more than $570 million in Philadelphia-area capital projects over the next two years - and more than $6.8 billion by 2026 - the transportation agency made a pitch Tuesday to involve more so-called Disadvantaged Business Enterprises in that work.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'I want to build beautiful things the world wants to use. " So said an application to an internship program with Girls Who Code, a national group that encourages young women to consider careers in computer science. Lots of women want to code, design, and be part of the communications/Internet/Web/mobile world. So do lots of people from all sorts of racial, ethnic, and economic backgrounds. Problem: That world is a male shop. A white male shop. Always has been. As a report released Wednesday by Twitter Inc. makes clear, the tech workplace is not diverse.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2014 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia is loaded with small dance companies, as anyone who has ever been to Fringe knows. These troupes rarely get to perform in fancy theaters, and it takes a lot of motivation for audiences to trek out to dingy performance spaces and sit on uncomfortable folding chairs all night. For the second year, Koresh Dance Company invited its colleagues to perform in the Suzanne Roberts Theatre in the Come Together Dance Festival. Over five days, which began Wednesday night, 24 companies have their 15 or so minutes of fame.
SPORTS
July 18, 2014 | BY PAUL DOMOWITCH, Daily News Staff Writer pdomo@aol.com
THE LIST OF quarterbacks who played in the United States Football League includes two Hall of Famers (Jim Kelly, Steve Young), a Super Bowl MVP (Doug Williams), an NFL MVP (Brian Sipe) and six Pro Bowlers (Kelly, Young, Sipe, Bobby Hebert, Doug Flutie and Greg Landry). The league's most successful quarterback, though, turned out to be a guy who barely made a ripple in the NFL. Chuck Fusina appeared in just 14 NFL regular-season games as a backup for the Tampa Bay Bucs and the Green Bay Packers.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Its finances are precarious, the mortgage is in foreclosure. Real estate agents are busily showing its home to potential buyers. A possible savior - Philadelphia's Roberts family - might offer a helping hand, but not yet. As the Philadelphia Theatre Company hangs on by a thread, theater leaders say its loss would be a blow - artistically, and to the city. "It's tragic for them, but also to the entire Philadelphia arts community and the idea of an Avenue of the Arts. You lose something like that and you'll need to take the sign down" on the Avenue of the Arts, said playwright Bruce Graham, who has had two plays produced by PTC. Terrence J. Nolen, the Arden Theatre Company's producing artistic director, said the PTC's abiding interest in American theater has made it a pioneer, and "certainly an important theater here in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former councilman in Collingdale Borough pleaded guilty Monday to stealing nearly $3 million from his former employer to fuel a gambling habit. James S. Bryan, 45, resigned his seat in October after more than 20 years of service when the allegations surfaced. He pleaded guilty to five counts of forgery and one count of theft before Delaware County Court Judge Mary Alice Brennan. He will be sentenced in October, according to court documents. Over 11 years, Bryan regularly stole money from Wescott Electric Co. in Aston, where he worked as a project manager.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
TWO PHILLY legislators yesterday called on the leaders of the nation's two largest tobacco companies to meet about their lobbying against a cigarette tax to fund the city's public schools. State Sens. Anthony Williams and Shirley Kitchen sent letters to Martin Barrington, CEO of the Altria Group, and Susan Cameron, CEO of R.J. Reynolds, asking for a sit-down with them and their Harrisburg lobbyists. The Daily News reported Thursday that those lobbyists had pushed for a five-year "sunset provision" to be inserted in pending legislation that would put a $2-per-pack tax on cigarettes sold in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Roberts family has moved up a $200,000 payment on a promised grant to the Philadelphia Theatre Company to help ease the company's cash crunch, but the philanthropists have not made any decision on a more substantial donation that might help solve its long-term financial troubles. Ralph and Suzanne Roberts - whose previous support earned them the right to put her flamboyant signature on the company's theater marquee - have preliminary findings of a report by outgoing Kennedy Center president Michael Kaiser on the company's viability.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Banks, their lobbyists, and their friends in Pennsylvania's General Assembly are struggling over who ought to pay the state's bank-shares tax. The tussle follows a failed overhaul that Harrisburg sources say has benefited the state's largest bank - Pittsburgh-based PNC Financial Services Group - while leaving an unexpected hole in the state budget. Slow-growing Pennsylvania is well known as a state that charges higher-than-average business taxes, until you make friends in high places, who can cut you a break.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Allied Wire & Cable Inc. needed a sales assistant to support its growing staff at its Collegeville wire manufacturing and distribution center. Here's what Cynthia Proska, the human resources manager, didn't have to do to fill the opening: She didn't advertise. She didn't post anything online, on any job board, anywhere. She didn't hire a recruiter. She didn't telephone a temp agency. Instead, the company's sales manager called Kevin Fink, 26, college intern, into his office - and offered him the job, barely a month into his internship as an assistant in the company's purchasing department.
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