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BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The companies headed by Nicholas Schorsch have bought more than $10 billion worth of hotels, clinics, stores, apartments, stockbrokerages, and investment funds across the United States, doubling their collective size. And that's just so far this year. "This is not growth for growth's sake," the fast-moving, solidly built Schorsch, 52, insisted in a conference call with investors Thursday. Rather, he said, "it is an all-out effort to gain competitive advantage" by growing so big that the group can buy and sell assets more cheaply.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Regulators at the Federal Communications Commission have restarted their formal review of Comcast Corp.'s proposed $45 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. A newly organized group, the Stop Mega Comcast Coalition, used the FCC's action Wednesday to ask the government to reject the proposal. The coalition consists mostly of companies and nonprofits that previously have criticized the deal, which would merge the nation's largest and second-largest cable-TV companies. "Mega Comcast would control an unprecedented 50 percent of the high-speed broadband wires across the country, and would be on a path to virtual dominance of the high-speed broadband market given that the combined company will pass two-thirds of U.S. households," Gene Kimmelman, president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit group Public Knowledge, said in a statement Wednesday.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vanguard Group has grown so large, it can throw its weight around in any boardroom in America. "We own about 5 percent of every publicly traded [U.S.] company," sometimes more, chief executive F. William McNabb told a conference at the University of Delaware's John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance on Oct. 30. McNabb said he has had to educate corporate managers who think Vanguard's funds of stocks, copied from indexes such as the S&P 500, are mere "passive" investors.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Berwyn and Paoli Fire Company officials agreed Tuesday to let Chester County's 911 task force decide for them the most efficient service boundaries for the two companies. The agreement, reached at a meeting with Tredyffrin Township officials, ends a longstanding dispute over which volunteer company could better serve certain areas in Tredyffrin. The dispute focused particularly on the Chesterbrook development of 2,392 homes and dozens of businesses now in the Berwyn company's service territory.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareholders had their say on pay in a big way at public companies this year. But anyone expecting widespread revolt over the big sums that many executives earned was probably disappointed. Just 37 of 2,293 companies whose shareholders had voted on compensation practices as of June 21 had failed to receive at least 50 percent of the shares voted in favor of those practices, according to Semler Brossy Consulting Group L.L.C. , a Princeton compensation consulting firm.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Bean's business depends on tragedy. Tuesday's earthquake in Northern California and last month's hurricane in South Carolina are the stuff on which his Evans American Corp. thrives. Founded eight years ago in Houston by his father, the company specializes in catastrophe management - helping companies rebuild their crumbled facilities far more quickly than normal. "I don't know anybody who does exactly what we do," said Bean, president of the company. "I know people who rebuild damaged buildings, but we fit into a niche market inside of a niche market.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Juliana Reyes, It's Our Money Writer
WHEN IT comes to large vacant buildings, developer Tony Rufo knows how to spot potential. More than a year ago, Rufo transformed the shuttered Nathaniel Hawthorne School into the Hawthorne Lofts: 53 units of luxury loft-style condominiums. The development offers floor-to-ceiling windows, a roof deck with a stunning view of Center City and ultra-low taxes thanks to a 10-year tax break from the city. According to Rufo's website, every unit has sold. But 2 miles south, just around the corner from South Philadelphia High School, sits a very different kind of Rufo property.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I TRACE MY roots back to 1862 (yes, during the Civil War) and railway legislation signed by Abraham Lincoln. Based in Omaha, I'm a top American transportation enterprise, with a railroad network spanning 23 states (mainly in the West) and more than 30,000 miles. I employ more than 40,000 people, use more than 8,000 locomotives and rake in more than $20 billion annually as I serve about 10,000 customers. My biggest customers include steamship lines, vehicle manufacturers, agricultural companies, utilities, intermodal companies and chemical manufacturers.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Ten Bucks County companies earned places on the Philadelphia 100, an annual list of fast-growing, privately held small companies in the Delaware Valley. "This year's companies are smaller than last year, more highly focused and probably have better long-term prospects," said David Thornburgh, director of the Wharton Small Business Development Center and manager of the project. "These are companies that have better defined their niche and have served those markets. They haven't had a strong economy to benefit from.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 5, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Regulators at the Federal Communications Commission have restarted their formal review of Comcast Corp.'s proposed $45 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. A newly organized group, the Stop Mega Comcast Coalition, used the FCC's action Wednesday to ask the government to reject the proposal. The coalition consists mostly of companies and nonprofits that previously have criticized the deal, which would merge the nation's largest and second-largest cable-TV companies. "Mega Comcast would control an unprecedented 50 percent of the high-speed broadband wires across the country, and would be on a path to virtual dominance of the high-speed broadband market given that the combined company will pass two-thirds of U.S. households," Gene Kimmelman, president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit group Public Knowledge, said in a statement Wednesday.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
With the help of former Kennedy Center president Michael M. Kaiser, the financially beleaguered Philadelphia Theatre Company has bought itself some time, buoying hopes for its survival. Kaiser, who was brought in to devise and execute a recovery plan, says the group now has a month-to-month lease with TD Bank on its home, which the bank continues to market for sale. Previously, PTC's residency in the space at the base of Symphony House at Broad and Lombard Streets had been assured only through the end of December.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Inquirer's parent company on Monday sued the Center City law firm Morgan Lewis & Bockius L.L.P., seeking to recover more than $880,000 in legal expenses paid during the bitter ownership dispute that led to the media company's sale in May. Lawyers for Interstate General Media contend that Morgan Lewis - retained to represent its interests in the ownership fight between former co-owners Lewis Katz and George E. Norcross III - engaged in fraud,...
BUSINESS
November 27, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Municipal bondholders owed $118.9 million are at the center of a dispute that is threatening the sale of Atlantic City's bankrupt Revel Casino Hotel. But two New Jersey companies, whose joint venture built and operates Revel's utility plant and owes the $118.9 million, could suffer significant collateral damage if efforts this week to salvage the sale are unsuccessful. The two partners each have $20 million in equity at stake in ACR Energy Partners L.L.C., the plant that chills water for Revel's air-conditioning, provides hot water, and distributes electricity to the 47-story tower.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Federal Communications Commission can move forward with its review of Comcast Corp.'s proposed $45 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. without disclosing confidential programming contracts, a federal appeals court said Friday. The FCC had no comment on Friday but was evaluating how to continue with its exhaustive regulatory review. The agency stopped its merger review on Oct. 3 to obtain more information from Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and Charter Communications, all of which are involved in the complex deal.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixteen companies have expressed interest in all or part of about 200 vacant acres known as Southport, at the eastern end of the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. They include energy companies, marine terminal operators, auto processors, and multipurpose terminal operators with ideas for the maritime property, south of the Walt Whitman Bridge on the Delaware River. The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA) said Tuesday that it would evaluate the responses and make recommendations to its board, which will have the final say. Southport is three waterfront parcels: 119 acres referred to as Southport Marine Terminal; 75 acres known as Southport West Terminal; and the Pier 124 "north berth," a 1,132-foot-long finger pier.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Nancy G. Heller, For The Inquirer
In its Philadelphia debut on Thursday night, Israel's Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company (KCDC) presented If At All , by artistic director Rami Be'er. While this piece gave the dancers an opportunity to show off their strength, flexibility, and stamina, in the end it was only a partial success. Be'er says he doesn't tell stories with his choreography, so viewers can make up their own interpretations. But at points, the dancers drop to the floor, accompanied by sounds of gunfire and screaming; they also beat their chests and "stab" themselves.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware Gov. Jack Markell said Uber, Lyft, Airbnb and other companies in the "sharing economy" are important to the revitalization of Wilmington. "I want to make sure we are friendly to these new industries," he said Monday, noting that other regulators, such as the Philadelphia Parking Authority, have been aggressively opposed to Uber, the ride-share company. Young people are attracted to urban areas where sharing services such as Uber are available, he said. "We want to make sure our downtowns gets their fair share of that," he said.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vanguard Group has grown so large, it can throw its weight around in any boardroom in America. "We own about 5 percent of every publicly traded [U.S.] company," sometimes more, chief executive F. William McNabb told a conference at the University of Delaware's John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance on Oct. 30. McNabb said he has had to educate corporate managers who think Vanguard's funds of stocks, copied from indexes such as the S&P 500, are mere "passive" investors.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The decadeslong consolidation of local cable TV firms into a few national networks led by Comcast Corp. has squeezed local outfits that used to wire customers for cable, according to a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court lawsuit by two Pennsylvania firms. Cable Line Inc. and McLaughlin Communications Inc. accuse Comcast Cable Communications of Pennsylvania Inc. of enticing them and other local operators to hire and train workers, add offices, borrow money for trucks and equipment - "only to abandon those firms once they had been induced to create the infrastructure necessary for Comcast's expansion," according to the lawsuit.
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