CollectionsCompanies
IN THE NEWS

Companies

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Berwyn and Paoli Fire Company officials agreed Tuesday to let Chester County's 911 task force decide for them the most efficient service boundaries for the two companies. The agreement, reached at a meeting with Tredyffrin Township officials, ends a longstanding dispute over which volunteer company could better serve certain areas in Tredyffrin. The dispute focused particularly on the Chesterbrook development of 2,392 homes and dozens of businesses now in the Berwyn company's service territory.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareholders had their say on pay in a big way at public companies this year. But anyone expecting widespread revolt over the big sums that many executives earned was probably disappointed. Just 37 of 2,293 companies whose shareholders had voted on compensation practices as of June 21 had failed to receive at least 50 percent of the shares voted in favor of those practices, according to Semler Brossy Consulting Group L.L.C. , a Princeton compensation consulting firm.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Bean's business depends on tragedy. Tuesday's earthquake in Northern California and last month's hurricane in South Carolina are the stuff on which his Evans American Corp. thrives. Founded eight years ago in Houston by his father, the company specializes in catastrophe management - helping companies rebuild their crumbled facilities far more quickly than normal. "I don't know anybody who does exactly what we do," said Bean, president of the company. "I know people who rebuild damaged buildings, but we fit into a niche market inside of a niche market.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The companies headed by Nicholas Schorsch have bought more than $10 billion worth of hotels, clinics, stores, apartments, stockbrokerages, and investment funds across the United States, doubling their collective size. And that's just so far this year. "This is not growth for growth's sake," the fast-moving, solidly built Schorsch, 52, insisted in a conference call with investors Thursday. Rather, he said, "it is an all-out effort to gain competitive advantage" by growing so big that the group can buy and sell assets more cheaply.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I TRACE MY roots back to 1862 (yes, during the Civil War) and railway legislation signed by Abraham Lincoln. Based in Omaha, I'm a top American transportation enterprise, with a railroad network spanning 23 states (mainly in the West) and more than 30,000 miles. I employ more than 40,000 people, use more than 8,000 locomotives and rake in more than $20 billion annually as I serve about 10,000 customers. My biggest customers include steamship lines, vehicle manufacturers, agricultural companies, utilities, intermodal companies and chemical manufacturers.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Ten Bucks County companies earned places on the Philadelphia 100, an annual list of fast-growing, privately held small companies in the Delaware Valley. "This year's companies are smaller than last year, more highly focused and probably have better long-term prospects," said David Thornburgh, director of the Wharton Small Business Development Center and manager of the project. "These are companies that have better defined their niche and have served those markets. They haven't had a strong economy to benefit from.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Bill Madway decided to take his own advice. After helping hundreds of people start their own companies, Madway started a research firm specializing in helping businesses buy and sell. "Research can help a company plan for the future by finding strengths and weaknesses and what the demand is for the company's product or service," Madway said. "The key is gathering information.. . . In a recession like the one we are in now, companies have to be more cautious about how they spend their money.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frustrated by a large number of small, fraudulent competitors, two of the largest Philadelphia-area ambulance operators recently joined forces. "The last couple of years have been really difficult for both companies. It's a very tough market," said Steve Barr, president and chief executive of Keystone Quality Transport Co., which has taken over the management of rival EMStar L.L.C. Company officials described the deal - which took effect Feb. 9, shortly after federal regulators launched an intensified crackdown on ambulance fraud in the Philadelphia region - as an alliance rather than a merger of the two privately owned medical transportation companies.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
E. Walter Karkut, 78, who owned and operated mailing and marketing companies before he retired, died Monday at his Abington home. A native of Harrisville, R.I., Mr. Karkut was raised in Fulton, N.Y. He enlisted in the Army before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, and he graduated from Officer Candidate School before he served in the Signal Corps. He had attained the rank of captain before his five-year hitch ended. Mr. Karkut was employed for 11 years by Mailing Service Inc. and left in 1958 as managing director to form Modern Mailers Inc. in Northeast Philadelphia.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 24, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pete Rose was painful for opponents during his 24 Major League Baseball seasons, including five with the Phillies, because no one played harder and no one collected more hits. The less physical but more significant pain, of course, for Rose, baseball, and its fans was Rose's gambling habits, which led to his banishment from the game in 1989. Now, nearing his 74th birthday, Rose will be paid to promote a pain reliever. He signed a one-year contract to appear in advertisements for Myoflex, an older brand-name, over-the-counter cream used to treat sore muscles and joints.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
KEMEL DAWKINS had a problem. As one of the lead contractors on the construction of the Pennsylvania Convention Center in the 1990s, he needed to find a black superintendent to oversee the toughest part of the project - renovation of the Reading Terminal train shed. Dawkins, himself African-American, needed a black man to boss the difficult operation in order to adhere to the Convention Center's strict affirmative-action program. Inspectors roamed the enormous project daily to make sure the proper ratio of women and African-American workers was on the job. Kemel Dawkins, who died Jan. 11 at the age of 91, solved the problem after a nationwide search when he and his partners selected Angelo R. Perryman, an Evergreen, Ala., native then working construction in Detroit.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chicago resident Keith Santangelo has filed a federal lawsuit against Comcast, claiming that the company took a $50 deposit in lieu of a credit check when he signed up for Internet service but then did a credit check on him anyway. The suit claims the company's action violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act and seeks class action status. Comcast had no comment on the pending litigation. A Comcast spokeswoman says that its policy is to take a deposit, typically $50, when a person declines to allow a credit check.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Wolfington Sr., 75, of Center City, president and chief executive officer of the Exton-based Wolfington Body Co., one of the largest school-bus dealers in the nation, died last week at his vacation home in the Poconos. Mr. Wolfington, a longtime Center City resident, died in his sleep sometime from Christmas Eve into Christmas morning in Monroe County, said son Richard Jr. "It was his favorite place on Earth," his son said of the getaway in Skytop. The family business was founded by Mr. Wolfington's great-grandfather in 1876 as a manufacturer of horse-drawn carriages in Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FORMER employee of ABM Janitorial Services claims in a lawsuit that he was discriminated against by the company because of his faith, race and disability. Vincent Danao, 49, of Logan, became a Hebrew Israelite in 2007. He said yesterday that after he did so, "I just began getting harassed and everything. " His lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia last month, contends that Danao faced hostility, got dumped with more work, was falsely criticized for his performance and was placed under increased scrutiny after he made his new religion known.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of 45 Philadelphia taxi companies filed suit in federal court Tuesday alleging that Uber, the app-based taxi enterprise, is waging unfair competition against medallion owners who must operate under state laws and regulations. Lead litigant Checker Cab Philadelphia and the other cab operators accused Uber of racketeering. "Not since the days of bootlegging has there been a criminal enterprise so brazen and open as to attract hundreds of millions of dollars in investment from investment bankers and to operate in blatant violation of federal and state law as Uber," reads the complaint.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Regulators at the Federal Communications Commission have restarted their formal review of Comcast Corp.'s proposed $45 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. A newly organized group, the Stop Mega Comcast Coalition, used the FCC's action Wednesday to ask the government to reject the proposal. The coalition consists mostly of companies and nonprofits that previously have criticized the deal, which would merge the nation's largest and second-largest cable-TV companies. "Mega Comcast would control an unprecedented 50 percent of the high-speed broadband wires across the country, and would be on a path to virtual dominance of the high-speed broadband market given that the combined company will pass two-thirds of U.S. households," Gene Kimmelman, president and chief executive officer of the nonprofit group Public Knowledge, said in a statement Wednesday.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
With the help of former Kennedy Center president Michael M. Kaiser, the financially beleaguered Philadelphia Theatre Company has bought itself some time, buoying hopes for its survival. Kaiser, who was brought in to devise and execute a recovery plan, says the group now has a month-to-month lease with TD Bank on its home, which the bank continues to market for sale. Previously, PTC's residency in the space at the base of Symphony House at Broad and Lombard Streets had been assured only through the end of December.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Inquirer's parent company on Monday sued the Center City law firm Morgan Lewis & Bockius L.L.P., seeking to recover more than $880,000 in legal expenses paid during the bitter ownership dispute that led to the media company's sale in May. Lawyers for Interstate General Media contend that Morgan Lewis - retained to represent its interests in the ownership fight between former co-owners Lewis Katz and George E. Norcross III - engaged in fraud,...
BUSINESS
November 27, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Municipal bondholders owed $118.9 million are at the center of a dispute that is threatening the sale of Atlantic City's bankrupt Revel Casino Hotel. But two New Jersey companies, whose joint venture built and operates Revel's utility plant and owes the $118.9 million, could suffer significant collateral damage if efforts this week to salvage the sale are unsuccessful. The two partners each have $20 million in equity at stake in ACR Energy Partners L.L.C., the plant that chills water for Revel's air-conditioning, provides hot water, and distributes electricity to the 47-story tower.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|