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BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2016
The amount spent by pharmaceutical firms, medical-device manufacturers, and other life-sciences companies for the regulatory guidance to move products to market is estimated at a staggering $20 billion to $30 billion a year. Time spent on the work is typically a big number, too - more accurately measured in months, not minutes. In that, Priya Bhutani saw business opportunity. She launched RegDesk in November 2014 to provide, in part, a marketplace to crowd-source regulatory consultants who would help medical-device and pharma companies launch their devices and drugs faster in more than 170 countries.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Berwyn and Paoli Fire Company officials agreed Tuesday to let Chester County's 911 task force decide for them the most efficient service boundaries for the two companies. The agreement, reached at a meeting with Tredyffrin Township officials, ends a longstanding dispute over which volunteer company could better serve certain areas in Tredyffrin. The dispute focused particularly on the Chesterbrook development of 2,392 homes and dozens of businesses now in the Berwyn company's service territory.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareholders had their say on pay in a big way at public companies this year. But anyone expecting widespread revolt over the big sums that many executives earned was probably disappointed. Just 37 of 2,293 companies whose shareholders had voted on compensation practices as of June 21 had failed to receive at least 50 percent of the shares voted in favor of those practices, according to Semler Brossy Consulting Group L.L.C. , a Princeton compensation consulting firm.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Bean's business depends on tragedy. Tuesday's earthquake in Northern California and last month's hurricane in South Carolina are the stuff on which his Evans American Corp. thrives. Founded eight years ago in Houston by his father, the company specializes in catastrophe management - helping companies rebuild their crumbled facilities far more quickly than normal. "I don't know anybody who does exactly what we do," said Bean, president of the company. "I know people who rebuild damaged buildings, but we fit into a niche market inside of a niche market.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frustrated by a large number of small, fraudulent competitors, two of the largest Philadelphia-area ambulance operators recently joined forces. "The last couple of years have been really difficult for both companies. It's a very tough market," said Steve Barr, president and chief executive of Keystone Quality Transport Co., which has taken over the management of rival EMStar L.L.C. Company officials described the deal - which took effect Feb. 9, shortly after federal regulators launched an intensified crackdown on ambulance fraud in the Philadelphia region - as an alliance rather than a merger of the two privately owned medical transportation companies.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I TRACE MY roots back to 1862 (yes, during the Civil War) and railway legislation signed by Abraham Lincoln. Based in Omaha, I'm a top American transportation enterprise, with a railroad network spanning 23 states (mainly in the West) and more than 30,000 miles. I employ more than 40,000 people, use more than 8,000 locomotives and rake in more than $20 billion annually as I serve about 10,000 customers. My biggest customers include steamship lines, vehicle manufacturers, agricultural companies, utilities, intermodal companies and chemical manufacturers.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Juliana Reyes, It's Our Money Writer
WHEN IT comes to large vacant buildings, developer Tony Rufo knows how to spot potential. More than a year ago, Rufo transformed the shuttered Nathaniel Hawthorne School into the Hawthorne Lofts: 53 units of luxury loft-style condominiums. The development offers floor-to-ceiling windows, a roof deck with a stunning view of Center City and ultra-low taxes thanks to a 10-year tax break from the city. According to Rufo's website, every unit has sold. But 2 miles south, just around the corner from South Philadelphia High School, sits a very different kind of Rufo property.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The companies headed by Nicholas Schorsch have bought more than $10 billion worth of hotels, clinics, stores, apartments, stockbrokerages, and investment funds across the United States, doubling their collective size. And that's just so far this year. "This is not growth for growth's sake," the fast-moving, solidly built Schorsch, 52, insisted in a conference call with investors Thursday. Rather, he said, "it is an all-out effort to gain competitive advantage" by growing so big that the group can buy and sell assets more cheaply.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Ten Bucks County companies earned places on the Philadelphia 100, an annual list of fast-growing, privately held small companies in the Delaware Valley. "This year's companies are smaller than last year, more highly focused and probably have better long-term prospects," said David Thornburgh, director of the Wharton Small Business Development Center and manager of the project. "These are companies that have better defined their niche and have served those markets. They haven't had a strong economy to benefit from.
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NEWS
January 30, 2016 | By Dana DiFilippo, Staff Writer
Bensalem police have arrested an Ardmore man for shooting another man at a trucking company Tuesday. Giorgi Kalandadze, 24, of the 200 block of Greenfield Avenue in Ardmore, was charged with aggravated assault, criminal conspiracy and related offenses for allegedly shooting a 46-year-old man at the Philadelphia Trucking Express on the 2500 block of State Road. The victim and Kalandadze were coworkers at the trucking company, Bensalem Lt. William McVey said. Kalandadze is in custody, but police are seeking two additional suspects who they believe were involved in the shooting, McVey said.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2016
The amount spent by pharmaceutical firms, medical-device manufacturers, and other life-sciences companies for the regulatory guidance to move products to market is estimated at a staggering $20 billion to $30 billion a year. Time spent on the work is typically a big number, too - more accurately measured in months, not minutes. In that, Priya Bhutani saw business opportunity. She launched RegDesk in November 2014 to provide, in part, a marketplace to crowd-source regulatory consultants who would help medical-device and pharma companies launch their devices and drugs faster in more than 170 countries.
NEWS
January 17, 2016
Wawa Inc., of Media, will raise the minimum hourly wage it pays store workers to $10. The move comes amidst a tightening labor market, where there is now competition for workers at all levels, including low-wage workers, economist Joel Naroff told members of the MidAtlantic Employers' Association Friday. Also raising its minimum wage is Sheetz Inc., the Altoona-based convenience store chain. The company, with $6.9 billion in revenue and 17,000 employees, said Wednesday it would spend $5 million to increase wages.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
DVL Group's Mike Beck can't find technicians for his Bristol air-conditioning company. Or even fresh electrical engineering graduates: "They want more money than ever," he said. At Penn Jersey Paper Co. in Northeast Philadelphia, human resource manager Adam Carne would like to know how to retain $15-an-hour warehouse workers. "It's a little bit of a challenge," he said. "The company is hiring at all levels. " "Retention, retention, retention - that's our number one initiative for 2016," said Kelly Andress, president of Sage Senior Living, a Springfield, Delaware County, company that owns and operates assisted living facilities.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Tmunity Therapeutics Inc., a Philadelphia company founded last year to build on research at the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Cellular Immunotherapies, said it received a $10 million investment from Penn Medicine and Lilly Asia Ventures, an affiliate of drugmaker Eli Lilly & Co. Gene therapy pioneer Carl June, who has led Penn's immunotherapy trials for more than two decades, cofounded Tmunity, which is working on therapies that enable...
NEWS
December 23, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
A trio of former top officials from the Colwyn Borough fire company were charged Monday with theft and conspiracy after a 10-month investigation revealed that they stole more than $52,000 from their own organization. Delaware County District Attorney Jack Whelan announced felony charges against Gary Brice, 49, Station 92's former chief; Betty Cellini, 50, Brice's girlfriend and the company's former president; and Cellini's daughter, Lauren, 26, the company's former treasurer. On Monday afternoon, Brice was in custody after failing to post $50,000 bail.
NEWS
December 19, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - Refineries and lawmakers in the Philadelphia area are cringing over one of the marquee provisions in the massive spending bill expected to pass Congress on Friday. The $1.1 trillion appropriations plan includes a provision to lift a 40-year-old ban on exports of crude oil, an idea championed by Republicans but opposed by local refiners that employ thousands and worry that the change will raise costs, cut profits, and toughen competition with foreign refineries. "The primary concern that I have is with the welfare of my workers," said Rep. Patrick Meehan, a vocal advocate for local refineries.
NEWS
December 13, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dow Chemical Co. and the DuPont Co. said Friday that they would combine in a "tax-free merger" into one company, DowDuPont, and then split into three separate firms. They plan to cut at least $3 billion in yearly expenses, shut offices and plants, and lay off thousands of workers, in the hope of driving up share prices and enriching investors. DuPont, based in Wilmington, also said Friday that even before the merger, it will displace around 5,400 of its 54,000 global employees.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philly is getting a lot of positive hype these days, but a majority of senior executives say they'd skip town for the right opportunity. "We're more at risk of losing talent than gaining talent," said John Touey, a principal at Salveson Stetson Group, an executive-search firm in Radnor that surveyed 863 upper-management executives in its database of potential or prospective job candidates. Even though seven in 10 said they were satisfied with their jobs, eight in 10 said they were either actively looking for new positions or would consider moving for the right jobs.
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