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BUSINESS
May 20, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
German supermarket giant Lidl is building up a real estate team in Philadelphia, establishing the city and environs as a beachhead in its aggressive U.S. expansion, the company's first foray outside Europe. The discount chain, a unit of the Schwarz Group grocery conglomerate, is seeking an acquisition manager and three other real estate staffers in the city, according to its U.S. website. Another acquisition manager is being sought in Pittsburgh, while more than a hundred additional slots are open - for jobs ranging from store managers to human-resources personnel - in a strip of East Coast states between Virginia, where Lidl U.S. is headquartered in Arlington, and Georgia.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Stephen Zarrilli, 55, needs a lot of patience or nerves of steel, or both. Zarrilli heads Safeguard Scientifics Inc., the firm that made its reputation in the 1990s as Philadelphia's answer to Silicon Valley's venture capital giants, pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into tech start-ups. When the tech bubble burst in 2000, it crushed Safeguard's stock and forced Safeguard's founder, Warren "Pete" Musser, to retire. These days, Zarrilli, who joined Safeguard in 2008 and became CEO in 2012, leads a more modest firm, investing tens of millions, not hundreds.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2016
The amount spent by pharmaceutical firms, medical-device manufacturers, and other life-sciences companies for the regulatory guidance to move products to market is estimated at a staggering $20 billion to $30 billion a year. Time spent on the work is typically a big number, too - more accurately measured in months, not minutes. In that, Priya Bhutani saw business opportunity. She launched RegDesk in November 2014 to provide, in part, a marketplace to crowd-source regulatory consultants who would help medical-device and pharma companies launch their devices and drugs faster in more than 170 countries.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareholders had their say on pay in a big way at public companies this year. But anyone expecting widespread revolt over the big sums that many executives earned was probably disappointed. Just 37 of 2,293 companies whose shareholders had voted on compensation practices as of June 21 had failed to receive at least 50 percent of the shares voted in favor of those practices, according to Semler Brossy Consulting Group L.L.C. , a Princeton compensation consulting firm.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The companies headed by Nicholas Schorsch have bought more than $10 billion worth of hotels, clinics, stores, apartments, stockbrokerages, and investment funds across the United States, doubling their collective size. And that's just so far this year. "This is not growth for growth's sake," the fast-moving, solidly built Schorsch, 52, insisted in a conference call with investors Thursday. Rather, he said, "it is an all-out effort to gain competitive advantage" by growing so big that the group can buy and sell assets more cheaply.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Berwyn and Paoli Fire Company officials agreed Tuesday to let Chester County's 911 task force decide for them the most efficient service boundaries for the two companies. The agreement, reached at a meeting with Tredyffrin Township officials, ends a longstanding dispute over which volunteer company could better serve certain areas in Tredyffrin. The dispute focused particularly on the Chesterbrook development of 2,392 homes and dozens of businesses now in the Berwyn company's service territory.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Bean's business depends on tragedy. Tuesday's earthquake in Northern California and last month's hurricane in South Carolina are the stuff on which his Evans American Corp. thrives. Founded eight years ago in Houston by his father, the company specializes in catastrophe management - helping companies rebuild their crumbled facilities far more quickly than normal. "I don't know anybody who does exactly what we do," said Bean, president of the company. "I know people who rebuild damaged buildings, but we fit into a niche market inside of a niche market.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Juliana Reyes, It's Our Money Writer
WHEN IT comes to large vacant buildings, developer Tony Rufo knows how to spot potential. More than a year ago, Rufo transformed the shuttered Nathaniel Hawthorne School into the Hawthorne Lofts: 53 units of luxury loft-style condominiums. The development offers floor-to-ceiling windows, a roof deck with a stunning view of Center City and ultra-low taxes thanks to a 10-year tax break from the city. According to Rufo's website, every unit has sold. But 2 miles south, just around the corner from South Philadelphia High School, sits a very different kind of Rufo property.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frustrated by a large number of small, fraudulent competitors, two of the largest Philadelphia-area ambulance operators recently joined forces. "The last couple of years have been really difficult for both companies. It's a very tough market," said Steve Barr, president and chief executive of Keystone Quality Transport Co., which has taken over the management of rival EMStar L.L.C. Company officials described the deal - which took effect Feb. 9, shortly after federal regulators launched an intensified crackdown on ambulance fraud in the Philadelphia region - as an alliance rather than a merger of the two privately owned medical transportation companies.
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NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia college student Jimmy Mulholland, who bicycled across the country last year, received many offers of help after his bike was recently stolen at 30th Street Station. Readers, touched by his misfortune, were quick to offer aid after reading a story on Philly.com about his plight last week. A Philadelphia lawyer provided tips on how Mulholland could possibly find his stolen bike: Call local bike shops in case the thief or someone else brings it there. Check out the Philadelphia Stolen Bikes group on Facebook.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
A subsidiary of Irvine, Calif.-based American Healthcare Investors has acquired a 48,000-square-foot medical office building at 502 Centennial Blvd. in Voorhees for $11.3 million. GAHC3 Voorhees NJ MOB L.L.C. purchased the building from Allcol Surgery Holdings L.L.C., real estate services firm Markeim Chalmers Inc., which helped broker the transaction, said in an e-mail on Monday. jadelman@phillynews.com 215-854-2615 @jacobadelman
NEWS
July 19, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
John A. Tobin, 50, of Philadelphia, a lawyer and software company president, died July 6 of cancer at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. He was diagnosed a year ago and stayed active until just before his death. Born in Boston and reared in the Boston suburbs, Mr. Tobin graduated from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School in 1987 with a bachelor of science degree in economics, and earned a degree from Penn's law school in 1992. After law school, he worked as a corporate and entertainment lawyer in Los Angeles, specializing in legal matters involving movies, TV, music transactions, and licensing agreements.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Michael Klein, Staff Writer
With a political convention's wheeling and dealing comes wining and dining. The 50,000 delegates, guests, and media representatives from around the country visiting later this month for the Democratic National Convention must eat. Restaurateurs are counting on all the visitors to shake the city's traditional summer doldrums, with delegates diving into dim sum in Chinatown, politicos gnawing on roast pork on South Street, and reporters slurping oysters...
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Zoë Miller, STAFF WRITER
From the piers of the Hudson River in New York to the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, REV Theatre Company has been putting a novel spin on Shakespearean plays (and other classic works) for more than a decade. Next week, the company goes to Cape May to perform A Midsummer Night's Dream on the outdoor stage of the Emlen Physick Estate. The creation of co-artistic directors Rosemary Hay and Rudy Caporaso, REV is named for the litany of powerful words that begin with the letters R-E-V.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Vibha Kannan and Bonnie L. Cook, STAFF WRITERS
Albert V. Grifone, 92, of Newtown Square, former vice president and chief financial officer of Triangle Publications Inc., publisher of TV Guide, died Thursday, June 30, of congestive heart failure at White Horse Village. Mr. Grifone's business career at Triangle, under publisher Walter H. Annenberg, spanned more than four decades. He also served on the board of directors from 1975 to 1988, the year the company was sold. Despite Mr. Grifone's professional successes, family members said he remained humble and grounded.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Stephen Zarrilli, 55, needs a lot of patience or nerves of steel, or both. Zarrilli heads Safeguard Scientifics Inc., the firm that made its reputation in the 1990s as Philadelphia's answer to Silicon Valley's venture capital giants, pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into tech start-ups. When the tech bubble burst in 2000, it crushed Safeguard's stock and forced Safeguard's founder, Warren "Pete" Musser, to retire. These days, Zarrilli, who joined Safeguard in 2008 and became CEO in 2012, leads a more modest firm, investing tens of millions, not hundreds.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
We want the homeless now encamped nightly outside the Convention Center to sleep somewhere else. That was the response by some readers to an Inquirer story last week by my colleagues Aubrey Whelan and Mensah Dean. The story reported that with the construction of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and LOVE Park, more homeless people are now sleeping in the underpass outside the Convention Center . What was hidden in the shadows is now in plain sight. Fine. It's uncomfortable to walk past.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
It's frustrating enough for water company workers to try to find an underground pipe with only a century-old handwritten piece of paper for reference. And sometimes, that slip of paper uses nonexistent landmarks - which house is it in front of? None of these houses is yellow anymore, and the writing is faded, or sloppy, or the drawing is crudely sketched. "And then you dig there - no, it's not there. And then you dig here - it's not here," said Chris Kahn, senior geographic information systems project manager for New Jersey American Water.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Staff Writer
An international animal-rights organization on Wednesday accused a supplier of eggs for Malvern-based Eggland's Best of cruelty and neglect of its hens. The company disputed the allegations. Mercy for Animals released undercover photos and videos on Wednesday from two Briarwood Farms locations in Washington State that showed workers mishandling birds, chickens kept in cramped and filthy cages, and sick and dead hens. "To the best of our knowledge . . . those flocks were never supplying Eggland's Best eggs," Bart Slaugh, the company's director of quality assurance, said.
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