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BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The companies headed by Nicholas Schorsch have bought more than $10 billion worth of hotels, clinics, stores, apartments, stockbrokerages, and investment funds across the United States, doubling their collective size. And that's just so far this year. "This is not growth for growth's sake," the fast-moving, solidly built Schorsch, 52, insisted in a conference call with investors Thursday. Rather, he said, "it is an all-out effort to gain competitive advantage" by growing so big that the group can buy and sell assets more cheaply.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2016
The amount spent by pharmaceutical firms, medical-device manufacturers, and other life-sciences companies for the regulatory guidance to move products to market is estimated at a staggering $20 billion to $30 billion a year. Time spent on the work is typically a big number, too - more accurately measured in months, not minutes. In that, Priya Bhutani saw business opportunity. She launched RegDesk in November 2014 to provide, in part, a marketplace to crowd-source regulatory consultants who would help medical-device and pharma companies launch their devices and drugs faster in more than 170 countries.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareholders had their say on pay in a big way at public companies this year. But anyone expecting widespread revolt over the big sums that many executives earned was probably disappointed. Just 37 of 2,293 companies whose shareholders had voted on compensation practices as of June 21 had failed to receive at least 50 percent of the shares voted in favor of those practices, according to Semler Brossy Consulting Group L.L.C. , a Princeton compensation consulting firm.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By Juliana Reyes, It's Our Money Writer
WHEN IT comes to large vacant buildings, developer Tony Rufo knows how to spot potential. More than a year ago, Rufo transformed the shuttered Nathaniel Hawthorne School into the Hawthorne Lofts: 53 units of luxury loft-style condominiums. The development offers floor-to-ceiling windows, a roof deck with a stunning view of Center City and ultra-low taxes thanks to a 10-year tax break from the city. According to Rufo's website, every unit has sold. But 2 miles south, just around the corner from South Philadelphia High School, sits a very different kind of Rufo property.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Berwyn and Paoli Fire Company officials agreed Tuesday to let Chester County's 911 task force decide for them the most efficient service boundaries for the two companies. The agreement, reached at a meeting with Tredyffrin Township officials, ends a longstanding dispute over which volunteer company could better serve certain areas in Tredyffrin. The dispute focused particularly on the Chesterbrook development of 2,392 homes and dozens of businesses now in the Berwyn company's service territory.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Bean's business depends on tragedy. Tuesday's earthquake in Northern California and last month's hurricane in South Carolina are the stuff on which his Evans American Corp. thrives. Founded eight years ago in Houston by his father, the company specializes in catastrophe management - helping companies rebuild their crumbled facilities far more quickly than normal. "I don't know anybody who does exactly what we do," said Bean, president of the company. "I know people who rebuild damaged buildings, but we fit into a niche market inside of a niche market.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frustrated by a large number of small, fraudulent competitors, two of the largest Philadelphia-area ambulance operators recently joined forces. "The last couple of years have been really difficult for both companies. It's a very tough market," said Steve Barr, president and chief executive of Keystone Quality Transport Co., which has taken over the management of rival EMStar L.L.C. Company officials described the deal - which took effect Feb. 9, shortly after federal regulators launched an intensified crackdown on ambulance fraud in the Philadelphia region - as an alliance rather than a merger of the two privately owned medical transportation companies.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I TRACE MY roots back to 1862 (yes, during the Civil War) and railway legislation signed by Abraham Lincoln. Based in Omaha, I'm a top American transportation enterprise, with a railroad network spanning 23 states (mainly in the West) and more than 30,000 miles. I employ more than 40,000 people, use more than 8,000 locomotives and rake in more than $20 billion annually as I serve about 10,000 customers. My biggest customers include steamship lines, vehicle manufacturers, agricultural companies, utilities, intermodal companies and chemical manufacturers.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Ten Bucks County companies earned places on the Philadelphia 100, an annual list of fast-growing, privately held small companies in the Delaware Valley. "This year's companies are smaller than last year, more highly focused and probably have better long-term prospects," said David Thornburgh, director of the Wharton Small Business Development Center and manager of the project. "These are companies that have better defined their niche and have served those markets. They haven't had a strong economy to benefit from.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Few mundane household tasks conjure a sense of looming disaster quite like the process of installing a window air-conditioning unit. Yet, for decades, many of us have returned each spring to the dread ritual: balancing a 50-pound metal box on the rim of a windowsill with one hand while jamming the windowpane shut with the other, and hoping the whole thing doesn't end up crashing to the ground or, worse, onto the head of a passerby below. So, Kurt Swanson, a mechanical engineer with a passion for thermodynamics, set out to build a better air conditioner.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
America is in the midst of an opioid epidemic, and Egalet Corp. thinks it can help. The Wayne company has developed technology that makes it harder for prescription painkillers to be altered for a quick high. The company's "abuse-deterrent" technology arrives at an auspicious time; the federal government is calling for stricter guidelines governing the distribution of opioids, and many companies are trying to find the right niche as new rules are developed. Egalet is one of more than a dozen companies working on abuse-deterrent formulations of oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine, and its stock has been on a wild ride.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
The Federal Trade Commission has sued Endo International, alleging that the company violated antitrust laws by entering into "anticompetitive reverse-payment" deals to block lower-cost generic versions of Endo's pain medicines. Endo is accused of "pay for delay" agreements with Watson Laboratories, now part of Allergan, and Impax Laboratories to stay off the market with cheaper generic copies of Endo's Opana ER, an opioid drug, and Lidoderm, a lidocaine patch, the FTC said in a complaint filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
Tonight - after way too long a winter hiatus - Fox's hip-hop drama, Empire, is back. So many unanswered questions: Will Rhonda, the pregnant wife of Lucious' son Andre, survive her tumble down the stairs? And who threw her? Will Anika ever tell Lucious' other son, Hakeem - played by handsome West Philadelphian Bryshere Y. Gray (Yazz the Greatest) - that she is preggers with his baby? And will Lucious be able to wrest his beloved company, Empire Entertainment, from the evil, manicured clutches of Camilla, whose salty character is well-portrayed by supermodel Naomi Campbell?
BUSINESS
March 28, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Ever so rarely, a company known for quiet growth in a sleepy business takes a secret, daring, unsettling step to try to reinvent itself as something bigger and bolder. Aqua America , the for-profit Bryn Mawr-based water company formerly known as Philadelphia Suburban, has grown for years by purchasing modest-sized town water and wastewater systems, boosting consumers' water rates, updating equipment, and enriching investors with dividends in states that encourage public-utility private enterprise.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Stanley S. Spiegel was about to open his firm, his wife, Sheila, said, he decided to name it as an engineer might. The firm, Esscube Engineering, used his initials - SSS - and for folks like him, she said, "three means a cube. " And so, in naming the firm, as in other matters, "he thought everything in mathematical terms. " On Friday, March 4, Mr. Spiegel, 83, of Marlton, former president of the research firm, based in Haddonfield and then in Southampton, Bucks County, died of kidney failure at his home.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
More than 1.2 million Walmart workers will find a raise in their paychecks Thursday, the company said, part of a $2.7 billion investment the company is making in higher pay and better career paths for its employees. "The investment in wages and the investment in training is how we've improved our store experience over the last year," said company spokesman Phillip Keene. The company is boosting wages to a minimum of $10 an hour for employees, from $9, but says the average hourly wage for full-time employees will be $13.31 in Pennsylvania, and $13.83 in New Jersey.
NEWS
March 9, 2016 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
There are plenty of examples of iconic dancer/visual art collaborations - Degas' ballerinas, Jasper Johns' set for Merce Cunningham, John Sloan's Isadora Duncan - but one in particular has local resonance. David Rush's Nureyev's Eyes , at Delaware Theatre Company, examines the long friendship between Russian defector and ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev and Chadds Ford painter Jamie Wyeth. The production, lifted straight from the George Street Playhouse, features the same team: William Connell as Wyeth, Bill Dawes as Nureyev (until March 16, when Jed Peterson - played Nureyev in the play's world premiere at Florida's American Stage Theatre Company - takes over the role)
BUSINESS
March 9, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Philadelphia drugmaker Spark Therapeutics Inc. has acquired for $15.1 million a private, Ireland-based gene-therapy company. Spark, spun out of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, said Monday that it bought Genable Technologies Ltd. for $6 million in cash and 265,000 shares of Spark stock, valued at $9.1 million based on Friday's closing price. Additional financial terms were not disclosed. Spark said Genable's potential treatment, RhoNova, will target a common form of a rare inherited retinal disease, which impacts about 30,000 people worldwide.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2016
They're the switch hitters of retail - players with a growing presence on the other side of the selling field. Online juggernaut Amazon.com opened its first brick-and-mortar store in November in Seattle. Around the same time, retail heavyweight Macy's announced it was shutting nearly 40 stores this year to beef up its online presence. Same with Sears, JC Penney, and the Gap - all closing stores. Kohl's announced on Feb. 25 that it was closing 18 stores nationwide - with locations to be announced by the end of this month.
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