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BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Candice Choi, Associated Press
Consumers are demanding better service in unprecedented ways. In the last several months, public outrage has helped beat back efforts by Bank of America Corp., Netflix Inc., and Verizon Communications Inc. to raise fees or significantly alter services. The victories come at a time when money is tight all around and consumers are tapping into social media to air their frustrations with like-minded individuals. "In the past, people would be angry, but they'd be all over the country talking to their neighbors," said Kit Yarrow, a professor of consumer psychology at Golden Gate University.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The companies headed by Nicholas Schorsch have bought more than $10 billion worth of hotels, clinics, stores, apartments, stockbrokerages, and investment funds across the United States, doubling their collective size. And that's just so far this year. "This is not growth for growth's sake," the fast-moving, solidly built Schorsch, 52, insisted in a conference call with investors Thursday. Rather, he said, "it is an all-out effort to gain competitive advantage" by growing so big that the group can buy and sell assets more cheaply.
NEWS
August 14, 2011 | Mike Armstrong, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareholders had their say on pay in a big way at public companies this year. But anyone expecting widespread revolt over the big sums that many executives earned was probably disappointed. Just 37 of 2,293 companies whose shareholders had voted on compensation practices as of June 21 had failed to receive at least 50 percent of the shares voted in favor of those practices, according to Semler Brossy Consulting Group L.L.C. , a Princeton compensation consulting firm.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Berwyn and Paoli Fire Company officials agreed Tuesday to let Chester County's 911 task force decide for them the most efficient service boundaries for the two companies. The agreement, reached at a meeting with Tredyffrin Township officials, ends a longstanding dispute over which volunteer company could better serve certain areas in Tredyffrin. The dispute focused particularly on the Chesterbrook development of 2,392 homes and dozens of businesses now in the Berwyn company's service territory.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1989 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nelson Bean's business depends on tragedy. Tuesday's earthquake in Northern California and last month's hurricane in South Carolina are the stuff on which his Evans American Corp. thrives. Founded eight years ago in Houston by his father, the company specializes in catastrophe management - helping companies rebuild their crumbled facilities far more quickly than normal. "I don't know anybody who does exactly what we do," said Bean, president of the company. "I know people who rebuild damaged buildings, but we fit into a niche market inside of a niche market.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frustrated by a large number of small, fraudulent competitors, two of the largest Philadelphia-area ambulance operators recently joined forces. "The last couple of years have been really difficult for both companies. It's a very tough market," said Steve Barr, president and chief executive of Keystone Quality Transport Co., which has taken over the management of rival EMStar L.L.C. Company officials described the deal - which took effect Feb. 9, shortly after federal regulators launched an intensified crackdown on ambulance fraud in the Philadelphia region - as an alliance rather than a merger of the two privately owned medical transportation companies.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
I TRACE MY roots back to 1862 (yes, during the Civil War) and railway legislation signed by Abraham Lincoln. Based in Omaha, I'm a top American transportation enterprise, with a railroad network spanning 23 states (mainly in the West) and more than 30,000 miles. I employ more than 40,000 people, use more than 8,000 locomotives and rake in more than $20 billion annually as I serve about 10,000 customers. My biggest customers include steamship lines, vehicle manufacturers, agricultural companies, utilities, intermodal companies and chemical manufacturers.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Ten Bucks County companies earned places on the Philadelphia 100, an annual list of fast-growing, privately held small companies in the Delaware Valley. "This year's companies are smaller than last year, more highly focused and probably have better long-term prospects," said David Thornburgh, director of the Wharton Small Business Development Center and manager of the project. "These are companies that have better defined their niche and have served those markets. They haven't had a strong economy to benefit from.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Bill Madway decided to take his own advice. After helping hundreds of people start their own companies, Madway started a research firm specializing in helping businesses buy and sell. "Research can help a company plan for the future by finding strengths and weaknesses and what the demand is for the company's product or service," Madway said. "The key is gathering information.. . . In a recession like the one we are in now, companies have to be more cautious about how they spend their money.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
E. Walter Karkut, 78, who owned and operated mailing and marketing companies before he retired, died Monday at his Abington home. A native of Harrisville, R.I., Mr. Karkut was raised in Fulton, N.Y. He enlisted in the Army before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, and he graduated from Officer Candidate School before he served in the Signal Corps. He had attained the rank of captain before his five-year hitch ended. Mr. Karkut was employed for 11 years by Mailing Service Inc. and left in 1958 as managing director to form Modern Mailers Inc. in Northeast Philadelphia.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 24, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lots of companies mount ambitious programs to hire college graduates, but the Graham Co., an insurance and risk-management company, takes a different approach. "As a rule, we don't hire right out of college," said Kenneth L. Ewell, 57, Graham's president and chief operating officer. Question: Why did Graham adopt that philosophy? Answer: You just have a higher degree of success [if] they've worked someplace else, and they have a little bit of context and they have some basis to judge Graham against.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The names some cable customers are being called after contacts with the companies that provide them services can be staggeringly profane: scatological and sexual, with allusions to body parts and perverted acts. They are often mailings of things like bills. Almost all of the names defy mention in a news story, but for some sense of it, here is one of the more temperate ones, received by a female Comcast customer: Super Bitch, which was first reported in the Chicago Tribune earlier this month.
NEWS
February 20, 2015
L ALIT KALANI, 31, of Bella Vista, co-founded Bandar Foods, which premiered its Indian hot sauces on Kickstarter in 2012. The sauces, sold at Whole Foods and other retailers, are inspired by Indian condiment flavors like spicy mango and mint cilantro. Kalani oversees production, while co-founder Dan Garblik, 32, of San Francisco, heads marketing. I spoke with Kalani. Q: How'd you and Dan come up with the idea? A: We were MBA classmates at Wharton. Dan went to an Indian restaurant here and asked for hot sauce and got Tabasco.
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Chester County company that assembles surgical carts used in medical facilities faces more than $42,000 in fines for exposing workers to chemical hazards, the U.S. Labor Department said Tuesday. Following a complaint in September, the U.S. Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration found that Seitz Technical Products in Oxford did not properly label hazardous chemicals, provide eye wash stations, train employees in use of hazardous chemicals or maintain a library of chemical safety sheets.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
| Lola Figueroa Clark doesn't have her advanced degree in marketing yet. But at 8 years old, the Mount Airy third grader already knows why construction toy manufacturers like K'nex Brands L.L.C. in Hatfield become so frustrated when marketing to girls. "Boys and girls both like" construction toys, Lola said. "But if you want to look for them in the toy stores, you have to look in the boys' section. " The result? In the growing $1.8 billion building and construction toy market, nearly half the potential buyers (i.e., girls)
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Less than a month after Camden officials trumpeted the launch of a project to demolish nearly 600 of the city's abandoned properties, the company that signed on for most of the work has backed away from the deal. National Demolition & Recycling, the Hamilton, N.J., company that submitted winning bids for 531 of the properties slated for teardown, told the city in a letter last week that it was withdrawing, citing concerns over asbestos removal as one reason. Camden spokesman Vincent Basara said the city had discussed the asbestos issues with the company before bidding took place.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The leadership shuffling at Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. over the last few years became evident again when the company filed its annual report with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The report from the Israel-based drugmaker, whose Americas headquarters is in North Wales, Montgomery County, included the five most highly compensated executives for the year ending Dec. 31, 2014. Chief executive officer Erez Vigodman was the first listed on the report, filed Monday evening, but he didn't have the highest total compensation last year, though only in part because he got that title on Feb. 11, 2014.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the New York Stock Exchange, which has become a theater for corporate product announcements now that most actual stock trades are done remotely by computer, Bill McDermott , Newtown Square chief executive of software-maker SAP SE , stood before stock analysts and reporters Tuesday to hype "the biggest product launch ever [by] the most global software company on the planet. " The product is an updated SAP business system called S/4 Hana, which McDermott promised would allow clients to "run your entire company, radically simplified, at a speed never before achieved, real-time, in the cloud," from a smartphone.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia company and two employees were charged Wednesday by state prosecutors with more than $1 million in Medicaid fraud. Infinite Care Inc., 6423 Rising Sun Ave., has been billing for services not provided or for inflated services since January 2010, according to a statewide grand jury presentment. Also charged were a sister company, Infinite Care Special Needs Inc.; Julio Miranda, vice president of both companies; and Wanda De Martinez, treasurer of both companies. Infinite Care paid family members to monitor home-care patients and then billed Medicaid for professional medical services that were not rendered, prosecutors said.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission is seeking about $45 million from a tech company that was central to a state investigation into corruption at the Turnpike Commission. In a lawsuit filed in Dauphin County Court, the Turnpike Commission contends that Ciber Inc., a Colorado-based technology firm, overcharged and under-delivered on its $82 million in contracts to create and install a computerized financial-reporting system for the turnpike. Former Ciber vice president Dennis Miller is also a defendant in the suit.
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