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Compassion

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NEWS
April 25, 2006 | By Ed Weirauch
Recently, we lost a bit of the spirits of Mother Teresa, Mahatma Gandhi and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. when Msgr. James P. Daly, a West Philadelphia pastor, died at age 93. His spirit embodied the power of compassion, and showed me the impact just one person can have on those who lose their way, are lost by our society, or are finding their way to prosperity. In the mid-1980s, I was a naive young guy from Cherry Hill who had yet to be exposed to real poverty. Working in public relations for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, I met Father Daly when the CBS Morning News produced a story on the dwindling number of Catholic priests.
NEWS
January 28, 1987
The Inquirer has failed to understand the essence of R. Budd Dwyer's suicide. Your Jan. 23 editorial was more concerned with condemning the act than trying to perceive the turmoil undoubtedly going on in his mind. How presumptuous to say he just gave up. Your judgmental view suggests The Inquirer is not as liberal as it pretends to be. There was no compassion. William F. Morris 3d Swarthmore.
NEWS
August 24, 2007
AS AN animal-lover, I found it funny that people were sending Michael Vick football jerseys to the Humane Society so that dogs could use them to defecate on. It made me reflect on going to the vet with my girlfriend to get physical checkups for our cats. I saw how the other animal-lovers were often caring, considerate and tolerant people. It made me realize that pets often act like their owners. The way the owners treat their pets usually is the same way they treat other people, and, from what I saw, these animal lovers were truly humane.
NEWS
August 9, 2004
LIKE MANY, I was disgusted when I saw the video footage of slaughterhouse workers stomping on chickens and slamming them into walls at the plant in West Virginia. But I was even more disgusted when I read a Daily News article that included comments from West Virginia prosecutor Lucas See, who said, "From where I stand, I don't think it's torture at this time. It looks as though that was the quickest method they had available to them to kill the birds. " If we can't define stomping an animal to death as "torture," what is?
NEWS
April 8, 1999 | Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
It's been 17 years since Peggy Donnolly's daughter was murdered. They have been difficult years for Donnelly. Years filled with sadness, overwhelmed by grief and tinged with fear. But the edge on Donnolly's pain has been softened by one man - 24th District Police Officer Michael Burns. Burns, Donnelly said yesterday, stood by her side, checking in, lending a hand and never failing her. "I had talked to him quite a few times and he calmed me down," she said. "He's really been very, very nice.
SPORTS
March 16, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
NFL luminaries, fans and family gathered in Green Bay on Saturday to remember Packers great Ray Nitschke, whose violent tackles became a signature of the Vince Lombardi teams that won five NFL titles in the 1960s. Some 1,250 people packed the auditorium-like sanctuary of Bayside Christian Fellowship church for an emotional memorial service punctuated by occasional laughter and applause. Nitschke's teammates and relatives recalled him as a consummate athlete, loving father and caring, generous man. "There will be a lot of people that will play middle linebacker for Green Bay and in the National Football League," said former Packers defensive end Willie Davis, a teammate of Nitschke.
NEWS
October 17, 2005 | By Sister Mary Scullion and William O'Brien
The horrors of Hurricane Katrina have touched a deep chord in Philadelphia. The city government responded by announcing "Project Brotherly Love," which offered housing and services for up to 1,000 families left homeless by the hurricane. Meanwhile, thousands of ordinary Philadelphians have contributed to relief funds and sent supplies to victims. Such gestures of compassion represent the best of our city's citizens. They make us proud to be Philadelphians. But the local outpouring of support also raises some important issues for us to wrestle with.
NEWS
July 9, 1996 | by Marvin Olasky, New York Times
Bob Dole removed his tie for a day but now regularly puts it on. Is he doing the same with the tie that binds him to a false definition of compassion? The Oxford English Dictionary defines compassion mainly as "suffering together with another, participation in suffering. " A compassionate person works directly with the needy. Passing a billion-dollar bill that provides housing or fights drugs is not necessarily a mark of compassion. But the word is used as a mantra by Democrats who want voters to remain "unshaken in liberalism's belief in government," as the Washington Post put it. When Republicans use the word, however, three styles are evident: On the Republican left, Sen. Alfonse D'Amato has claimed that his party needs to show more compassion by spending more money on education and welfare.
NEWS
November 16, 1995 | BY GEORGE F. WILL
Balkan savagery is forcing Americans to think through a moral dilemma that brings to mind one of the great comic figures of English fiction - Mrs. Jellyby in Charles Dickens' "Bleak House. " She makes a brief appearance in a brilliant essay soon to be published in The National Interest quarterly - "Compassion and the Globalization of the Spectacle of Suffering," by Clifford Orwin of the University of Toronto. Mrs. Jellyby was the ditzy do-gooder who practiced "telescopic philanthropy.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen T. Johnson Sr., 63, of Northeast Philadelphia, a retired deputy commissioner who served the city's Police Department for more than three decades, died Thursday, Jan. 1, of pancreatic cancer at a hospice in Valley Forge. In 1977, Mr. Johnson followed his father, James A. Johnson, onto the force. He mimicked his father by later serving on the prestigious Highway Patrol as well as patrolling in Kensington and South and West Philadelphia. A competitive man, he climbed the ranks, becoming a sergeant in the 12th District in Southwest Philadelphia and then a lieutenant assigned to the 25th District.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The hours of trying to calm a fussy 3-month-old led Carolyn Kent Rovee-Collier to a lifetime study and new understanding of infant psychology. Dr. Rovee-Collier's creative solution - discovered in 1965 while she was working on her doctoral thesis - involved tying a ribbon to baby Benjamin's ankle so he could set his crib mobile in motion on his own. Benjamin's response proved that preverbal infants could learn and remember, according to Dr. Rovee-Collier's son...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
WrIters used to lead such interesting lives - fomenting rebellions (Bakunin, Mishima), fighting wars (Hemingway, Orwell), exploring exotic lands (Freya Stark), committing felonies (Mark Read, Gregory David Roberts). These authors embodied the exceptional; a one-person show no doubt would focus on their unique personalities and adventures. Deb Margolin's 8 Stops , a gentle, powerful meditation on mortality given its world premiere Thursday through Saturday at the Kimmel Center's SEI Innovation Studio, doesn't fall into that category.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
HUNLOCK CREEK, Pa. - As state House speaker and Democratic leader, Bill DeWeese held forth many nights at Harrisburg's priciest restaurants, dining on prime rib and fine wine on a lobbyist's dime. On a recent afternoon, in a prison 120 miles from the Capitol, DeWeese carefully peeled a handful of spinach leaves from a container, savoring every bite. "I never get salad here," said DeWeese, now inmate KK-1888. Until his downfall in a 2012 corruption case, DeWeese was among the Capitol's most colorful characters and power brokers.
NEWS
February 16, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the middle of Friday's horrific crash on the Pennsylvania Turnpike between Bensalem and Willow Grove, scenes of concern and compassion were everywhere. Friends and strangers alike came together to take care of one another, both at the site of the accidents and in the miles-long backup that resulted. An 11-month-old girl was delivered from her mother's cold car to her warm day-care center by a group of friends. Strangers shared food and drink. A few men helped a woman recharge her car's battery after another woman provided jumper cables.
NEWS
October 19, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
A central Pennsylvania chicken factory accused this week of treating newborn chicks cruelly has denied the allegations made by an animal-rights organization. "Over my 40 years as a chicken farmer, I always strive to be the leading advocate of humane treatment for all animals," Scott Sechler, owner of Lebanon County-based Bell & Evans, wrote in a letter on the firm's website. "We've never strayed from humane animal best practices. " Compassion Over Killing, a Washington-based nonprofit that says its mission is preventing animal cruelty and promoting vegetarianism, released a video this week recorded by an undercover investigator who spent several weeks working in the Bell & Evans hatchery in Fredericksburg.
NEWS
September 5, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Compassion is rare inside Philadelphia's Criminal Justice Center. Maybe that's why Tuesday's victim-impact statement by James R. Kenny overshadowed the guilty plea of Angel Roque, who admitted killing Kenny's sister in a 2011 hit-and-run. "I ask for mercy on this man," said Kenny, 47, looking at Roque about 20 feet away. "I know about his other offenses, but I do know there is goodness inside this person. " Kenny barely mentioned why he was there: the impact of the Sept. 29, 2011, death of his older sister Joyce, whom Roque ran down before trying to devise an alibi by abandoning his GMC pickup truck and reporting it stolen.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
By Greg Sargent The Congressional Budget Office's finding that immigration reform would reduce the deficit hasn't stopped opponents from pressing forward with other absurd arguments. Case in point: Ted Cruz argued on the Senate floor recently that immigration reform should be opposed for the sake of undocumented immigrants. Cruz (R., Texas) stood before an image of a graveyard and solemnly eulogized unnamed souls killed crossing the border. "This is a system that produces human tragedy," he said.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE FAMILY OF Bryn Mawr native Sunil Tripathi turned yesterday's tragic news into a moment of reflection, hoping "Sunny's" death would make us all a little more aware of one another. "This last month has changed our lives forever, and we hope it will change yours, too," the Tripathi family wrote in a short letter yesterday. "Take care of one another. Be gentle, be compassionate. Be open to letting someone in when it is you who is faltering. Lend your hand. We need it. The world needs it. " A body found Tuesday floating in the Providence River was positively identified as Tripathi yesterday after a forensic-dental examination, said Dara Chadwick, a spokeswoman for the Rhode Island Department of Health.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013
DEAR ABBY: My husband is now involved in his third computer affair. He's a teacher, and his first one was with a student. He was almost fired over it. He apologized to me and to his supervisor, said it was an "error in judgment" and promised it would never happen again. Last week I found an email he had sent to another former student, and the things he said to her were disgusting. I know if this gets back to his boss, he'll be fired. He's a brilliant man and an excellent teacher.
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