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Compassion

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NEWS
April 25, 2006 | By Ed Weirauch
Recently, we lost a bit of the spirits of Mother Teresa, Mahatma Gandhi and the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. when Msgr. James P. Daly, a West Philadelphia pastor, died at age 93. His spirit embodied the power of compassion, and showed me the impact just one person can have on those who lose their way, are lost by our society, or are finding their way to prosperity. In the mid-1980s, I was a naive young guy from Cherry Hill who had yet to be exposed to real poverty. Working in public relations for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, I met Father Daly when the CBS Morning News produced a story on the dwindling number of Catholic priests.
NEWS
January 28, 1987
The Inquirer has failed to understand the essence of R. Budd Dwyer's suicide. Your Jan. 23 editorial was more concerned with condemning the act than trying to perceive the turmoil undoubtedly going on in his mind. How presumptuous to say he just gave up. Your judgmental view suggests The Inquirer is not as liberal as it pretends to be. There was no compassion. William F. Morris 3d Swarthmore.
NEWS
August 24, 2007
AS AN animal-lover, I found it funny that people were sending Michael Vick football jerseys to the Humane Society so that dogs could use them to defecate on. It made me reflect on going to the vet with my girlfriend to get physical checkups for our cats. I saw how the other animal-lovers were often caring, considerate and tolerant people. It made me realize that pets often act like their owners. The way the owners treat their pets usually is the same way they treat other people, and, from what I saw, these animal lovers were truly humane.
NEWS
August 9, 2004
LIKE MANY, I was disgusted when I saw the video footage of slaughterhouse workers stomping on chickens and slamming them into walls at the plant in West Virginia. But I was even more disgusted when I read a Daily News article that included comments from West Virginia prosecutor Lucas See, who said, "From where I stand, I don't think it's torture at this time. It looks as though that was the quickest method they had available to them to kill the birds. " If we can't define stomping an animal to death as "torture," what is?
NEWS
April 8, 1999 | Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
It's been 17 years since Peggy Donnolly's daughter was murdered. They have been difficult years for Donnelly. Years filled with sadness, overwhelmed by grief and tinged with fear. But the edge on Donnolly's pain has been softened by one man - 24th District Police Officer Michael Burns. Burns, Donnelly said yesterday, stood by her side, checking in, lending a hand and never failing her. "I had talked to him quite a few times and he calmed me down," she said. "He's really been very, very nice.
SPORTS
March 16, 1998 | Daily News Wire Services
NFL luminaries, fans and family gathered in Green Bay on Saturday to remember Packers great Ray Nitschke, whose violent tackles became a signature of the Vince Lombardi teams that won five NFL titles in the 1960s. Some 1,250 people packed the auditorium-like sanctuary of Bayside Christian Fellowship church for an emotional memorial service punctuated by occasional laughter and applause. Nitschke's teammates and relatives recalled him as a consummate athlete, loving father and caring, generous man. "There will be a lot of people that will play middle linebacker for Green Bay and in the National Football League," said former Packers defensive end Willie Davis, a teammate of Nitschke.
NEWS
October 17, 2005 | By Sister Mary Scullion and William O'Brien
The horrors of Hurricane Katrina have touched a deep chord in Philadelphia. The city government responded by announcing "Project Brotherly Love," which offered housing and services for up to 1,000 families left homeless by the hurricane. Meanwhile, thousands of ordinary Philadelphians have contributed to relief funds and sent supplies to victims. Such gestures of compassion represent the best of our city's citizens. They make us proud to be Philadelphians. But the local outpouring of support also raises some important issues for us to wrestle with.
NEWS
July 9, 1996 | by Marvin Olasky, New York Times
Bob Dole removed his tie for a day but now regularly puts it on. Is he doing the same with the tie that binds him to a false definition of compassion? The Oxford English Dictionary defines compassion mainly as "suffering together with another, participation in suffering. " A compassionate person works directly with the needy. Passing a billion-dollar bill that provides housing or fights drugs is not necessarily a mark of compassion. But the word is used as a mantra by Democrats who want voters to remain "unshaken in liberalism's belief in government," as the Washington Post put it. When Republicans use the word, however, three styles are evident: On the Republican left, Sen. Alfonse D'Amato has claimed that his party needs to show more compassion by spending more money on education and welfare.
NEWS
November 16, 1995 | BY GEORGE F. WILL
Balkan savagery is forcing Americans to think through a moral dilemma that brings to mind one of the great comic figures of English fiction - Mrs. Jellyby in Charles Dickens' "Bleak House. " She makes a brief appearance in a brilliant essay soon to be published in The National Interest quarterly - "Compassion and the Globalization of the Spectacle of Suffering," by Clifford Orwin of the University of Toronto. Mrs. Jellyby was the ditzy do-gooder who practiced "telescopic philanthropy.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
Those who have longed to hear the ceaselessly modern voices of The Crossing sing something old - as in J.S. Bach old - will finally get their wish, though in poetically fragmented form. Having established itself as a new-music ensemble over the last decade, The Crossing and its cofounder/director Donald Nally now take on a massive work of compassion and suffering - political and social implications included. The project is built around the 1680 crucifixion oratorio Membra Jesu Nostri by Dieterich Buxtehude, interspersed with seven new companion pieces by contemporary composers from around the world, each with highly individualistic voices.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Derik Moore's job defined stressful. When he worked as a Philadelphia Department of Human Services investigator, he was the one who talked to children who had been abused, sometimes sexually, and confronted their abusers. But he was handling it OK, Moore thought, triumphing when he made a difference, and accepting "a baseline melancholy" as part of life. "Then my dentist says, 'You're grinding the hell out of your teeth,' " Moore said. Stress in the body, stress at home, distance from loved ones, ulcers, high blood pressure: it all comes from "compassion fatigue," and for the 50 counselors and therapists attending a workshop Wednesday on "Stress Management & Self Care in the Field," Moore's story rang all too true.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
ISSUE | POPE FRANCIS Not enough 'joy' The title " Amoris Laetitia ," or "The Joy of Love," seems strange for a document by Pope Francis that calls "irregular" relationships emblematic of those who live in an "imperfect manner" ("Pope urges compassion for gays, divorced," Saturday). Love is a loose term, and joy is an emotional reaction for those who are no longer distressed, angered, frightened, or disgusted by being judged "irregular" and "imperfect. " Compassion without celebration remains a form of denigration.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
Pope Francis on Friday issued a much-anticipated document on family that overturns no major teachings of the Catholic Church, but calls on its clergy to be compassionate and to welcome divorced-and-remarried couples, gays, and those who live in an "imperfect manner. " The church and its clergy have been "wasting pastoral energy on denouncing a decadent world without proactively proposing ways to finding true happiness," Francis wrote in the document, titled "Amoris Laetitia ," or "The Joy of Love.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Vance Lehmkuhl, Staff Writer
WITH ITS CHARMING contrast of redbrick buildings and white cherry-tree blossoms, Lancaster is a beautiful place to be right now. It's also an exciting place for those interested in animal-free foods. This traditionally meat-and-dairy-based region is now on the vegan-friendly map, thanks to some forward-looking companies and a growing demand for their foods. Recently, I checked in with four such businesses while noting other vegan options ( see sidebar ) for Philadelphians who might want to venture west for a day or weekend.
NEWS
March 11, 2016
STU BYKOFSKY's points in his column against immigrants seem to be coming from a visceral place of fear rather than research about immigrants in U.S. society. He and other anti-immigrant advocates, focus on the tragic murder of a woman in San Francisco by a man who was in this country without documents, while neglecting to discuss research about immigration and crime. The individual event is much more sensational than evidence from scientific studies. In fact, neighborhoods with a high share of immigrants are safer than other neighborhoods at similar income levels.
NEWS
February 9, 2016 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
LAMAR ANDERSON wasn't sure what the sound was. Suburban Station is usually a blur of movement and noise, but that thump was different from any other background noise he'd grown accustomed to. When he turned to see what it was, he almost couldn't believe it. It was the sound of metal being slammed into a man's skull. Steps away, at the ticket counter, a man was beating another over the head with what police would later discover was a pipe wrench. Anderson, 37, homeless for 11 years, is one of the many men and women who find their way to the station at dawn after a night on the streets or in one of the city's shelters.
NEWS
February 6, 2016
By Cindy Sanford On Jan. 25, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 6-3 in favor of giving minors convicted of homicide a chance to have their cases reviewed, an immediate, palpable gratitude overwhelmed me. I rejoiced that most of the justices ruling in Montgomery v. Louisiana recognized that children are different from adults and that their actions, even when they involve terrible crimes, are less likely to reflect irreparable corruption. Such feelings of mercy and compassion did not come easily to me. As a lifelong conservative, I prided myself on being an advocate of victims, not a liberal "bleeding heart" championing the cause of misfits and felons.
NEWS
January 18, 2016
ISSUE | REFUGEES Compassion, not pain A humanitarian crisis in Central America has driven hundreds of thousands of refugees - including more than 115,000 unaccompanied children - to the United States since 2014. In the last quarter of last year, more than 10,000 Central American children crossed into this country. This situation demands compassionate and sensible approaches. Instead, inhumane federal deportation practices are tearing apart these refugees' communities ("Deportation controversy," Jan. 10)
NEWS
December 18, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Lawrence F. Kienle, 92, a radiologist who retired in 1978 from the former West Jersey Health System, died Friday, Dec. 4, at the Masonic Healthcare Center in Elizabethtown, Lancaster County, where he had lived in recent years. Though he spent his career in South Jersey, Dr. Kienle made his largest mark after he had retired. A. Craig Hillemeier, dean of Pennsylvania State University's College of Medicine, announced his passing by calling him "a man of towering generosity" who was "passionate about patient-centered care.
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