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Complaints

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1986 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Black correspondents, producers and associate producers for ABC News recently attended a meeting with News president Roone Arledge to air several long-standing complaints. The complaints included the fact that there are no minorities on the division's editorial board. The group also complained about the way minorities are portrayed on the news, and how correspondents are being used to present the news. George Strait, ABC medical reporter and former Washington correspondent for Channel 6, is spokesman for the disgruntled employees.
NEWS
November 12, 1986 | By Rosemary Banks, Special to The Inquirer
When community affairs director Lawrence C. Smith was given the additional duties of investigating complaints of police abuse here, he was also handed an office near the mayor and a longer title. What the job amounts to is anyone's guess. As civilian complaints officer, Smith is responsible for policing the police when residents choose not to take complaints of official misconduct through the usual channels - the department's own internal affairs division. But in his three weeks on the job, no one has brought him any complaints.
NEWS
August 9, 1987 | By Tim Wright, Special to The Inquirer
The Sadsbury Township supervisors will announce at their Aug. 25 work session whether they intend to hold a hearing on complaints from residents about township police Officer Lewis Wilson, according to Ronald Agulnick, township solicitor. About a dozen residents of Pomeroy, an area in the southeastern corner of the township, attended the supervisors' Monday meeting to press their complaints. Larelda Lowery, who described herself as a spokeswoman for the group, complained of the manner in which "Wilson represents himself in our area.
NEWS
April 13, 1986 | By Nicole Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
In a township that covers only three square miles, an abandoned or inoperative car is sure to be noticed and, after a few sightings, is sure to draw some complaints. In the last few months, the Hainesport Township Committee has been barraged by complaints about more than 25 abandoned cars in township streets, yards and driveways. In response to those complaints, the committee is preparing an ordinance that would allow the township to levy fines of up to $500 and 90-day jail terms on owners of such vehicles.
BUSINESS
February 6, 1986 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Electric Co. could face fines totaling $216,000 because of complaints that the company violated state rules on customer service, the Public Utility Commission's consumer-service bureau said yesterday. The PUC's consumer-service bureau has charged PE with 216 violations involving meter readings, billing and shutoffs of electric or gas service to homes, according to Kevin Cadden, a supervisor with the division. The bureau is to present its complaint to the three-member PUC this morning.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By Kerry Lippincott, Special to The Inquirer
Woodland Drive in West Caln Township is as steep as a ski slope and as hazardous as an obstacle course. And those are only some of the problems with the street, according to one local resident. At a township meeting Monday night, Woodland Drive resident Elizabeth Weaver told the Board of Supervisors that there was no speed limit posted on the 500-yard stretch of road wedged between Sandy Hill and Cambridge Roads, just north of Route 340. "Cars come racing down this short-cut route, and police say they can't do anything about it because there is no sign posted," said Weaver.
NEWS
February 7, 2004 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Immaculata University officials yesterday agreed to let student leaders air their complaints about graduation to the school's commencement committee on Feb. 20, a university spokeswoman said. The move came after a four-hour demonstration Thursday in the school's cafeteria building, Nazareth Hall. Student leaders met yesterday afternoon with Stephen Pugliese, the school's vice president for student affairs. The spokeswoman, Marie Moughan, said the meeting was a step forward for resolving whether the final classes of the Women's College could be grouped by school at graduation.
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
What do you do when one of your neighbors tinkers with cars until the wee hours of the morning, spills oil on your driveway, then spray-paints in his garage until the fumes seep into your child's bedroom? Calling police is not the answer, according to a group of Folcroft residents who lodged complaints at Monday night's Borough Council meeting. The neighbor has a scanner, they said, which alerts him before the police arrive. Area residents identified the alleged offender as George Custodio, who was not at the meeting and could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
The Consumer Finance Protection Bureau has begun to take complaints about student loans, it said Monday. The bureau will assist all borrowers experiencing problems taking out or repaying a private loan or managing one in default and referred to a debt collector. Complaints may be submitted through 1-855-411-2372; at www.consumerfinance.gov ; faxed at 1-855-237-2392, or mailed to the bureau at P.O. Box 4503, Iowa City, Iowa 52244.    - Alan J. Heavens
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | By Mary Beth Dougherty, Special to The Inquirer
The Sadsbury Board of Supervisors has set Oct. 14 for a closed hearing for police Officer Lewis Wilson, against whom several residents have filed complaints. The number and the specific nature of the complaints were not made public when the board met Monday, but police Chief Jay Groce has said he believes that the residents' complaints stemmed from Wilson's "aggressive manner" in following up complaints last summer about youths riding unlicensed motorcycles and dirt bikes in the area.
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NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a surgical device spread an aggressive but undetected uterine cancer inside anesthesiologist Amy Reed in late 2013, she and her husband launched a campaign to ban electric morcellators. Now, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has gotten involved, according to Reed's husband, Philadelphia heart surgeon Hooman Noorchashm, and Sarah Robinson, a California woman whose cancer was also worsened by the device. Both said Wednesday that they have been interviewed by FBI agents, and believe the FBI is looking into whether manufacturers failed to report deaths and serious injuries to the Food and Drug Administration, as required by federal law. "I had been trying to get the FBI's attention for a very long time," said Noorchashm, a heart surgeon at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former city prosecutor has charged in a complaint to the state Supreme Court that the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office knowingly used a police officer as witness in an untold number of cases although he admitted committing perjury. "Thousands of defendants were not afforded their proper due process rights," former Assistant District Attorney Andrew Justin Thomson said in his complaint dated Wednesday. Thomson's complaint to the high court's Disciplinary Board alleged the District Attorney's Office allowed Officer Christopher Hulmes to testify for more than three years after he admitted in 2011 to a city judge that he perjured himself in a case he was involved with.
NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
Attorney General Kathleen Kane promoted a top aide to serve as her chief of staff despite a report from her internal affairs unit informing her he had made unwanted sexual advances to two female colleagues, The Inquirer has learned. The report summarized the findings of an internal investigation that found Jonathan Duecker had groped one woman and made improper sexual advances to another, according to people with knowledge of the matter. That document was sent to Kane the weekend before she promoted Duecker, a onetime supervisor of narcotics agents, to chief of staff, the sources said.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
A House committee voted Thursday to subpoena personnel files from the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs benefits office, saying VA officials had ignored its requests for months. It is only the third time the House Committee on Veterans Affairs has issued a subpoena, and the latest sign that scrutiny of the Philadelphia office, which culminated in a blistering investigative report released last month, is expanding. "There is no doubt that there are serious issues plaguing the operations of the Philadelphia regional office," said Chairman Jeff Miller (R., Fla.)
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was not long after sundown when a Camden County Police cruiser, its emergency lights off, stopped Malik Macklin in the alley behind his home in September 2013. The sergeant was searching for a man with a gun and asked Macklin what he was doing. Macklin, a soft-spoken 21-year-old who did not match the suspect's description, says he was confused about why police stopped him and did not respond. Things quickly got out of hand, and two more officers arrived. The sergeant said Macklin charged at him and a fight ensued.
SPORTS
February 27, 2015
CLEARWATER, Fla. - For eight minutes Wednesday, Cliff Lee offered pitches to a rotating trio of teammates: Carlos Ruiz, Ben Revere, and Freddy Galvis. The live batting practice was the first time Lee threw to hitters since a strained elbow cost him the last two months of last season. The reports provided to Ryne Sandberg were "excellent," the manager said. "Felt good," Lee said. "Felt normal. No complaints. " Lee threw each of his pitches in the session. The 36-year-old lefthander warmed up with a bullpen session, his third of spring training.
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The clothing donation bin appeared on the North Philadelphia street corner without warning, a metal box caked with bubble-gum pink paint and rust. Stenciled on the side in small blue letters was this message: "Through your donations we provide money to charities & give employees occupation. " Jay Butler, who owns the adjacent property near Erie Avenue and 21st Street, didn't think much of it. Until the bin filled up, and clothing - along with a mattress, a broken television, and an empty bottle of brandy - littered the sidewalk.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
An ethics complaint was filed Wednesday against Westampton Township Committeeman Robert Maybury, alleging that he had a conflict of interest when he cast a deciding vote in the hiring of Jason Carty as the town's fire chief/EMS director. When Carty was a commissioner with the Mount Holly Municipal Utilities Authority, he voted to hire Maybury as the interim executive director in October, according to the complaint filed by John Paff, chairman of the New Jersey Libertarian Party's Open Government Advocacy Project.
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The National Labor Relations Board's Philadelphia office has agreed to hear complaints filed by Au Bon Pain employees at the Philadelphia International Airport. In their unfair labor practice charges filed last year, the employees complained that in September the company tried to dissuade them from attempting to form a union by disciplining two of the activists, by currying favor by offering to pay for an employee's child care and by bringing in the Boston-based company's chief executive to meet workers.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Union carpenters and Teamsters angling to regain their jobs at the Convention Center had their hopes thwarted Monday when a hearing examiner for the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board said the board did not have jurisdiction to handle a complaint filed by the two unions. The unions, which have been staging protests outside the Convention Center for months, lost the right to work there in May, when they did not sign a new customer-satisfaction agreement by a deadline set by the Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority board.
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