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Complaints

NEWS
January 15, 1987 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
In its first official meeting of the new year, the Haverford Township Board of Commissioners heard complaints Monday night about its lack of progress on two potentially hazardous problems of long standing in the township. It also postponed action that had been scheduled on ordinances governing the height of fences and the use of satellite dishes. Complaints centered on an abandoned house at 109 County Line Road, which has been vacant for about six years, and on the Llanerch Quarry, where flooding has further eroded stone walls in the creek bed of Naylor's Run. Peter Moor, who lives near the abandoned house, which is on County Line Road, adjacent to the polo field, called the site "a hazard waiting for a tragedy to take place.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1990 | By Mary Gagnier, Special to The Inquirer
For the last two years, Art Linkletter has sung the praises of the Contour chair. He has one himself, he tells his television audience, and he says he enjoys it. And if a viewer wants to buy one, the manufacturer may throw in a TV, VCR or microwave. Other television spots have extolled the virtues of the Craftmatic adjustable beds. Both the bed and the chair, their makers say, are designed to reduce tension and enhance relaxation. Behind those advertising campaigns, however, Craftmatic/Contour Industries Inc., the Trevose manufacturer of adjustable beds and chairs, has been fighting a barrage of complaints.
NEWS
January 9, 2002
I cannot believe that the mayor is going to appoint his wife to a position in the city of Philadelphia. What has me annoyed is that there are many people looking for work who need a job to pay their bills and have no other income - just let them try to get a city job. Maryann Zindell, Philadelphia Fie on Fidel . . . I find it hard to believe how Michael Smerconish can come off like a "kid in a candy shop" regarding his visit with...
NEWS
January 29, 1986 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angered by an incident in which the failure of a walkie-talkie reportedly endangered the life of a police officer, the union representing Deptford Township's 43 police officers has drawn up a list of complaints that it plans to present to the Township Council within the next two weeks. Wayne Quesada, president of Lodge 72 of the Fraternal Order of Police, met with union members last week to formulate the list. Quesada said it includes complaints that rechargeable walkie-talkies remain charged for transmission for only about 20 minutes, and that there are a shortage of police cars, a lack of maintenance for weapons and insufficient training for officers.
NEWS
October 30, 1989 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
WYSP-FM's (94.1) Howard Stern has some explaining to do. Or least his lawyers do. On Thursday, the FCC fined four radio stations $20,000 apiece and announced it was investigating four others on complaints of indecency. Not fined, but among those being investigated is WXRK-FM in New York, the 'YSP sister station from which Stern broadcasts his morning show. At issue is a skit Stern did Dec. 16 - which aired on 'YSP - that prompted eight letters of complaint to the FCC, mainly for his use of the word penis.
NEWS
June 21, 2010 | By Kathleen Brady Shea, Inquirer Staff Writer
The clock is ticking for residents who are dissatisfied with Bluegreen Corp., an $8 billion business that blanketed parts of Pennsylvania with high-pressure time-share marketing. Consumers have until Thursday to file formal complaints for consideration in a consumer-protection settlement with the Florida company. Bluegreen sold time-shares to more than 5,700 Pennsylvanians, said Nils Frederiksen, a spokesman for the Attorney General's Office. In response to numerous complaints, the attorney general in October 2008 filed a consumer-protection lawsuit against four subsidiaries of the company: Bluegreen Corp.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
The district attorney's office received more than four times as many complaints of balloting irregularities yesterday as during last year's primary, some requiring further investigation, a spokesman said last night. "A lot of these complaints are polling-place bickering and that is supposed to be typical of committeeman elections," said the spokesman, Charles Cunningham. About 4,000 committee races also were on the primary ballot, along with major contests like governor. Cunningham said the complaints were "spread throughout the city, one here, two there," and Frederick L. Voigt, executive-secretary of the Committee of Seventy, a political watchdog group, said the alleged irregularities did not appear to be "part of a pattern or conspiracy.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1987 | By James R. Carroll, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Almost one in five commercial flights was at least 15 minutes late in October - but that was an improvement from September, the latest federal report on air travel said yesterday. Helped by what is considered a slower travel period in October, the nation's 14 largest airlines also recorded fewer passenger complaints, fewer problems with lost baggage and fewer overbooked flights, according to the Department of Transportation. The report, which covered 20,000 scheduled flights and is intended to help airline customers make travel decisions, gave the best on-time ratings to American Airlines, Southwest Airlines and Continental Airlines, which also were best in September.
NEWS
July 3, 1988 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owner of a Caln Township group home for the retarded last week defended his business against accusations that it hurt the community. Edmund St.Peter, chief executive officer of TeSaK Inc., told the township Board of Commissioners on Thursday that the three residents of the Jonathan Drive home want to be good neighbors. St.Peter said nearby residents have complained of unkempt lawns and heavy traffic through the neighborhood. He conceded that in the past the property was not well-cared for, but he said that has changed.
NEWS
January 16, 1987 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fewer citizens reported that they had been physically abused by police in 1986 than in any year since 1982, when the Police Department began keeping detailed records of such complaints, according to the records. At the same time, the total number of citizen complaints against police for any reason was the lowest in the last eight years. The number of fatal shootings by police last year - four - was the lowest since 1982. In addition, Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker fired more officers last year - 39 - than any commissioner in the last six years.
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