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Complaints

BUSINESS
August 2, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Workers who push passengers in wheelchairs at Philadelphia International Airport have withdrawn complaints filed with the U.S. Department of Transportation that alleged they did not receive proper training from their employer, PrimeFlight Aviation Services, and equipment to do their jobs safely. The workers dropped their action naming PrimeFlight and airlines including US Airways Group, United, and Southwest after seeing documentation that they had received the required training. In May, the workers alleged violations of the federal Air Carrier Access Act and asked the Transportation Department to impose fines and order the airlines to force PrimeFlight to correct the problems.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | BY JOHN MORITZ, Daily News Staff Writer moritzj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
THE EXPOSED rebar, crumbling concrete pillars and steady drips of water that turn potholes into puddles - even on sunny days - stretch for more than a mile under the elevated train tracks along 25th Street in South Philly. As mile-long trains rumble overhead, the street shakes and small pieces of concrete fall to the sidewalk, a daily routine that for years has been eating away at the residents who have become all but complacent with the dangers from the tracks above. Yesterday, quarter-sized nuggets of concrete littered the ground.
SPORTS
June 13, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
A SPANISH prosecutor filed a fraud complaint yesterday against Lionel Messi, alleging the Barcelona and Argentina soccer star owes $5.3 million in back taxes. The complaint names Messi and his father, Jorge Horacio Messi. Both are accused of defrauding millions on income-tax returns for 2007, 2008 and 2009. "We are surprised," Messi said on his Facebook account, "because we have never committed any infringement. We have always fulfilled all our tax obligations, following the advice of our tax consultants who will take care of clarifying this situation.
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Paul Nussbaum, and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
Despite multiple complaints, shoddy demolition work at 22d and Market Streets went uninspected for more than three weeks before the deadly collapse of a building Wednesday, raising basic questions about the city's competence regulating demolition projects. Six people were killed and 14 injured when a four-story brick wall fell onto an adjoining single-story Salvation Army thrift shop. Mayor Nutter and Licenses and Inspections Commissioner Carlton Williams acknowledged Thursday that the city had granted a demolition permit for that project without any inquiry into the contractor's qualifications for demolition work.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Robert Burns, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Officers with a finger on the trigger of the Air Force's most powerful nuclear missiles are complaining of a wide array of morale-sapping pressures, according to internal e-mails obtained by the Associated Press. The complaints shed fresh light on dissatisfactions roiling this critical arm of the Air Force, an undercurrent that has captured the attention of the service's leaders. Key themes among the complaints include working under "poor leadership" and being stuck in "dead-end careers" in nuclear weapons, one e-mail said.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | DAVID GAMBACORTA & DANA DiFILIPPO
POLICE Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey said yesterday that he has ordered Internal Affairs to reopen the 18 complaints civilians filed against disgraced narcotics cop Jeffrey Walker during his 24-year career. Walker, 44, was caught after allegedly stealing $15,000 from a Philadelphia Housing Authority-owned rowhouse in Kingsessing Tuesday in an FBI sting. Ramsey suspended him from the force with the intent to dismiss. The Daily News found that none of the previous Internal Affairs complaints, which accused Walker of misdeeds ranging from physical assaults to theft, was ever sustained.
NEWS
May 23, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
JEFFREY WALKER, the veteran Philly narcotics cop who was federally charged yesterday with allegedly robbing a drug dealer, has been the subject of 18 Internal Affairs complaints during his career. The civilian complaints - none of which was sustained - included accusations of theft, physical and verbal abuse, and illegal searches. Walker, 44, joined the police force in 1989 and was assigned to the Narcotics Field Unit South 10 years later. Walker has worked with some of the six narcotics cops who were transferred to different assignments in December after the District Attorney's Office said that the officers would no longer be called to testify in drug cases.
NEWS
May 22, 2013 | By Chris Palmer and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia District Attorney's Office did not pursue criminal charges in early 2012 against former Police Officer Richard DeCoatsworth - once hailed as a hero, now charged over the weekend with rape - because the complainant, Steven Kocher, was not considered a credible witness, according to First Assistant District Attorney Edward McCann. McCann and Tasha Jamerson, a spokeswoman for the District Attorney's Office, said that Kocher told prosecutors and police different stories about an incident in January 2012 in which Kocher accused DeCoatsworth of assaulting him over a debt, and that the disparities were enough to dissuade prosecutors from pursuing criminal charges.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
IN THE DARKNESS of night, the complaints were etched in chalk up and down the walkways of Swarthmore College, a 399-acre oasis of green quads and liberal student activism southwest of Philadelphia. "Welcome to Swarthmore," said one of the scribblings that recently confronted students - and administrators - when the sun rose. "Home of my rapist. " The so-called chalkings, which infuriated Swarthmore's president, were a turning point in a controversy that has rattled one of America's top-ranked liberal-arts schools.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THE FEDERAL Occupational Health & Safety Administration has launched an inspection into working conditions at Philadelphia International Airport in response to a series of complaints filed last week on behalf of subcontracted baggage handlers and wheelchair attendants. The inspection, which can take up to six months, is a standard response to work-condition complaints, OSHA spokeswoman Leni Fortson said. The complaints allege that some airport workers employed by the subcontractor PrimeFlight Aviation Services, which does business in Philly with US Airways, United and Southwest, do not receive training on how to help handicapped passengers, are exposed to blood and other bodily fluids without protection and are forced to use faulty equipment.
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