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Complaints

NEWS
May 8, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
THE FEDERAL Occupational Health & Safety Administration has launched an inspection into working conditions at Philadelphia International Airport in response to a series of complaints filed last week on behalf of subcontracted baggage handlers and wheelchair attendants. The inspection, which can take up to six months, is a standard response to work-condition complaints, OSHA spokeswoman Leni Fortson said. The complaints allege that some airport workers employed by the subcontractor PrimeFlight Aviation Services, which does business in Philly with US Airways, United and Southwest, do not receive training on how to help handicapped passengers, are exposed to blood and other bodily fluids without protection and are forced to use faulty equipment.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Workers who push passengers in wheelchairs at Philadelphia International Airport filed complaints with the U.S. Transportation Department and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) alleging that their employer, PrimeFlight Aviation Services, and three airlines that contract with it failed to provide proper training and equipment to safely do their jobs. The complaints, filed Thursday, allege violations of the federal Air Carrier Access Act and ask the Transportation Department to impose fines and order US Airways, United Airlines, and Southwest Airlines to force PrimeFlight to correct the problems.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
MORE ALLEGED victims of sexual misconduct are expected to join a complaint by 22 current and former students accusing Swarthmore College of violating a federal law that mandates reporting of crimes, advocates say. The complaint, filed with the U.S. Department of Education earlier this month, claims that the elite Delaware County college underreported incidents of sexual misconduct - a violation of the federal Clery Act. Students also plan to...
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students at Swarthmore College say they plan to file a second federal complaint claiming that the school has not adequately responded to reports of sexual assault. A coalition called Swarthmore Assault Prevention and Survivor Advocates (SAPSA) said the new filing will allege that the college violated Title IX provisions by allowing a sexually hostile environment and denying women equal access to education opportunities. The Title IX law, commonly associated with funding for women's sports, also contains civil-rights regulations.
SPORTS
April 17, 2013 | Daily News staff and wire reports
A SECOND complaint has been lodged against the Wisconsin-Green Bay men's basketball coach Brian Wardle , this one alleging verbal abuse and bullying. Gina Cougill , the mother of senior forward Brennan Cougill , wrote to university chancellor Thomas Harden last week, shortly after the parents of former center Ryan Bross filed the initial complaint against Wardle. Gina Cougill provided a copy of her letter to the Green Bay Press-Gazette . In it, she accused Wardle of minimizing her son's clinical depression as a "distraction," and said other players have been subjected to worse treatment.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Thirteen mortgage servicers will pay a total of $9.3 billion to settle federal complaints over foreclosure-processing and loan-servicing methods. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) and the Federal Reserve announced the final settlement Thursday as amendments to enforcement actions against the 13. Covered by the agreement are: Aurora, Bank of America, Citibank, Goldman Sachs, HSBC, JPMorgan Chase, MetLife Bank, Morgan Stanley, PNC, Sovereign, SunTrust, U.S. Bank, and Wells Fargo.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer and James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writers
More than three-quarters of New Jersey police departments failed to give the public correct information when they were asked how to file a complaint against officers, the American Civil Liberties Union has found. The organization Tuesday released a report based on a 2012 survey of 497 departments. It followed a similar study conducted in 2009 that produced similar findings. "The results remained disconcerting," the report said. "Once again, a majority of local departments provided inaccurate information in response to the most basic questions regarding individuals' rights to file [internal affairs]
NEWS
February 13, 2013
Court proceedings were recessed for at least two days in the federal civil lawsuit against the Philadelphia Housing Authority by former Executive Director Carl R. Greene - who was fired in September 2010 and contends that the agency owes him $743,000 in lost pay, plus damages. Court officials said the nonjury trial would not reconvene until at least Wednesday. One source said only that "the parties are talking. " The trial, which started Feb. 4 before U.S. District Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter, was interrupted last week for a settlement conference, court records show.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Barbara Boyerand James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
More than three-quarters of New Jersey police departments failed to give the public correct information when they were asked how to file a complaint against officers, the American Civil Liberties Union has found. The organization Tuesday released a report based on a 2012 survey of 497 departments. It followed a similar study conducted in 2009 that produced similar findings. "The results remained disconcerting," the report said. "Once again, a majority of local departments provided inaccurate information in response to the most basic questions regarding individuals' rights to file [internal affairs]
BUSINESS
January 9, 2013 | By Daniel Wagner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Ten major banks agreed Monday to pay $8.5 billion to settle federal complaints that they wrongfully foreclosed on homeowners who should have been allowed to stay in their homes. The banks, which include JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo, will pay billions to homeowners to end review of foreclosure files that was required under a 2011 enforcement action. The review was ordered because banks mishandled paperwork and skipped required steps in the foreclosure process.
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