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BUSINESS
September 22, 1987 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
After two developers and three lawsuits in five years, the former Rittenhouse Place hotel and condominium project is at last set for completion. The president of Ameribass Realty Co. of Philadelphia, David Marshall, said today the company will spend $100 million over the next two years to complete the unfinished project. Construction will begin in October. The project, to be known as The Rittenhouse, will include a 100-room hotel and 200 luxury condominium units. The building will also contain a health club and two restaurants.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
Long-stalled public improvements in the West Meadows development in West Grove are under way and some are even ahead of schedule, according to the engineer managing the project. Stephen Woodward, the borough's engineering consultant, said at a meeting Monday that the project was expected to cost $210,000, to be paid by the original developer, West Meadows Associates, from its escrow fund of $331,000. After nearly three years of delay, the borough took over the project from West Meadows Associates under an agreement signed early this fall.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | By Stephen C. Row, Special to The Inquirer
The Bensalem Council has given developer Alan Sobel until Sept. 16 to meet several conditions originally stipulated in the township's approval of his Bucks County Estates subdivision. If the conditions are not met, officials said, the township will assume responsibility for the completion of the project, using funds placed in escrow by Sobel. "The township has undertaken (completion of) several developments recently," said Barbara Barnes, the council chairwoman. "I'm tired of empty promises.
NEWS
July 28, 1989 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
And now, new hope for commuters who have sweated, fretted, fumed or simply waited patiently in stop-and-go traffic on the Schuylkill Expressway: The $200 million reconstruction project that has been under way for more than four years might be finished by Labor Day. Meeting such a deadline would be finishing the project early, since the current schedule calls for completion by Sept. 18. Nevertheless, state Department of Transportation officials and the contractors, I.A. Construction Corp.
NEWS
October 8, 1996 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After months of following detour signs, dodging orange barrels and driving on bumpy roads, Lower Bucks travelers can soon celebrate the full opening of Route 213. PennDot officials said both lanes should be open by the end of next week. "Right now, weather permitting, we hope to have the road open the week of Oct. 14," said Gene Blaum, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. That is good news for motorists who have waited for Route 213 to be completed since work started in May 1995.
NEWS
June 15, 2010
Officials Monday celebrated the near-completion of a housing development in Southwest Philadelphia that will provide 63 affordable apartments to veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq and their families. The townhouse-style complex of seven buildings in the 6200 block of Eastwick Avenue includes the Robert Brady Sr. Veterans Center, where veterans can get access to services and the community can hold meetings. - Thomas Fitzgerald
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Nutter and other local officials today celebrated the $30 million rehabbing of two Broad Street Line subway stations, marking the end of 32 SEPTA projects funded with $191 million in federal stimulus grants. Noting that 507 jobs were created by the upgrades to the Spring Garden and Girard stations, Nutter said "this is what infrastructure renewal is all about. " The overhaul was the first ever for the 1920s-era stations. Workers installed elevators and new stairs, new lighting and signage, new cashier booths and fare lines, new power and fire-suppression systems, repaired floors and ceilings and installed colorful artwork commissioned for the stations.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1986 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
A confident Philadelphia Electric Co. chairman yesterday said that the utility had "turned the corner" on construction of its Limerick nuclear plant and was on its way toward completing the controversial $7 billion power station by the current target date of late 1990. James L. Everett told security dealers and analysts that "we're on the downslope of the hill" at Limerick, with one unit in operation and the second close to half-finished. "We can see some light at the end of the tunnel, and we don't think it's train coming the other way," Everett said.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
A second frame supporting the roof of Philadelphia's Academy of Music has been found seriously damaged, and more severely than one that had been found damaged earlier, the Academy's engineering consultant disclosed yesterday. The bottom crosspiece, or chord, of the frame - technically known as a truss - was found to be completely fractured, said the consultant, Nicholas L. Gianopulos. "You could almost put your hand through it," he said. The injury to the truss, called T-2, was discovered April 3, Gianopulos said, five days after less severe damage was found in an adjacent truss, T-3. The trusses are made of two 6-inch-wide, 14-inch-deep beams fastened together side by side.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The roar of backhoes has added a noisy note to springtime at Swarthmore College as the school launches a $25 million construction project. The project, which was to have an official groundbreaking ceremony today, will dramatically change the northern part of campus when it is completed in 1998. The Parrish annex, now used mostly for faculty offices, will be razed and replaced by a new academic building that will house the departments of economics, modern languages and sociology/anthropology, plus 44 faculty offices, 13 classrooms, and seminar rooms.
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BUSINESS
May 6, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas Jefferson University and Abington Health completed their affiliation last week, according to a notice to bondholders Monday. Under the arrangement, Jefferson's board will be reconstituted to have 11 members each from Jefferson and Abington. Two unaffiliated members of the new board are to be picked later. Abington, which has two hospitals in Montgomery County - Abington Memorial and Lansdale Hospital - will be a subsidiary of Thomas Jefferson University. Jefferson and Abington announced their definitive agreement in January.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia jury of six men and six women was selected Monday to hear the murder trial of a Levittown exterminator charged in the 2013 strangling of Philadelphia doctor Melissa Ketunuti. Jason Smith, 39, is accused of killing Ketunuti, 35, a pediatrician and researcher at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, during a Jan. 21, 2013, argument at her house in 1700 block of Naudain Street in the Graduate Hospital area of Center City. Smith, an independent exterminator hired by a Bucks County firm, was assigned to rid Ketunuti's rowhouse of mice.
TRAVEL
April 20, 2015 | By Betty Organt, For The Inquirer
As a teacher of history and a child of the Cold War period, I was always fascinated with the events that led to the U.S. embargo against Cuba. The island nation, the Caribbean's largest, was the "forbidden fruit" of travel, which only heightened my desire to visit it. When I learned about the people-to-people tours that allowed travellers to go to Cuba to see what the Cuban government wanted them to see, I quickly made a reservation. After a briefing on what to expect, what not to expect (toilet seats in most places)
SPORTS
April 17, 2015 | BY DAVID MURPHY, Daily News Staff Writer dmurphy@phillynews.com
NEW YORK - If you are looking for positives, there were a couple. Odubel Herrera, the dreadlocked Rule 5 draft pick who has spent the last couple of nights at the top of the order, tallied three extra-base hits. Cody Asche, the second-year starter at third base, continued his torrid start to the season by reaching base in all four of his plate appearances. The negatives included just about everything else, most of all the fact that Asche and Herrera combined to score only one run, thanks to a 2-for-16 showing with runners in scoring position.
SPORTS
April 1, 2015 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
LIKE THE NFL'S endangered extra point, physicals given to players to make signings and trades official tend to be almost automatic. That might not be the case when Eagles doctors give wideout Miles Austin the once-over, though. Austin, who turns 31 in June, last played a full NFL season in 2012 and has a chronic hamstring problem. The NFL Network's Ian Rapoport reported yesterday that the Birds have signed Austin to a 1-year deal worth $2.3 million, with another $700,000 possible in incentives.
SPORTS
March 1, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
CLEARWATER, Fla. - David Buchanan entered his first major-league spring training as a late invitee. Baseball's 29 other teams had passed on him in the previous December's Rule 5 draft. He donned a No. 78 uniform, the highest number issued to a player in camp. This spring has a different feel. Buchanan is sporting No. 55, the same number in which he made 20 post-April starts last season and recorded a 3.95 ERA for the Phillies. A year after his breakout spring, he is competing to begin the season in the major-league rotation.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cerner Corp., of North Kansas City, Mo., said Monday that it completed its $1.3 billion purchase of Malvern's Siemens Health Services, joining two rivals in the rapidly changing field of health-information technology. Cerner offered jobs to all but a few of the roughly 2,800 Siemens employees in Malvern, with 95 percent to 97 percent of them accepting the offers, said Dick Flanigan, a senior vice president at Cerner. "We wanted to maintain and build upon much of the work that's been done by the Malvern team," Flanigan said, adding that the deal included Siemens' corporate campus.
SPORTS
January 26, 2015 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
IT WAS THE PERFECT ending to two of the best days of his professional life. Philly product Kyle Lowry couldn't have scripted his 48 hours in his hometown any better, and it all culminated with his Toronto Raptors taking a 91-86 win away from the 76ers last night at the Wells Fargo Center. Lowry and his team arrived in town after Wednesday's game in Memphis and after a practice Thursday at Temple, had a team dinner at Lowry's Philadelphia home. While he and family and teammates were there enjoying a meal, they all learned that Lowry had been voted in by fans as a starting guard for the Eastern Conference in next month's All-Star Game in New York.
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
There's an open wound running down the middle of Björk's chest on the cover of her new album Vulnicura (One Little Indian ***1/2), a gash in her heart that the music contained therein hopes to heal. Vulnicura was leaked on the Internet last weekend, then released on iTunes on Tuesday. But it's not the thievery that has the Icelandic avant-pop singer in pain - it's the end of her long-term relationship with Matthew Barney, the Cremaster Cycle visual artist and father of their daughter, Isadora.
SPORTS
January 12, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
It was just one small play in a one-sided basketball game, one January moment that will be forgotten as the schedule grinds toward March, but it was Ryan Arcidiacono's favorite of the day on Saturday at the Pavilion. DePaul guards Durrell McDonald and Billy Garrett Jr. were trying to advance the ball out of the backcourt against trapping pressure when McDonald made a hurried pass that caught Garrett on a short hop, and Garrett bobbled it ever so slightly as he reached down to pull it in. It was nothing really, a momentary lapse, but it was enough of an opening for Arcidiacono to close in on Garrett, dive at his feet, and knock the ball to the far end of the court.
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