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Completion

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BUSINESS
September 22, 1987 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
After two developers and three lawsuits in five years, the former Rittenhouse Place hotel and condominium project is at last set for completion. The president of Ameribass Realty Co. of Philadelphia, David Marshall, said today the company will spend $100 million over the next two years to complete the unfinished project. Construction will begin in October. The project, to be known as The Rittenhouse, will include a 100-room hotel and 200 luxury condominium units. The building will also contain a health club and two restaurants.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
Long-stalled public improvements in the West Meadows development in West Grove are under way and some are even ahead of schedule, according to the engineer managing the project. Stephen Woodward, the borough's engineering consultant, said at a meeting Monday that the project was expected to cost $210,000, to be paid by the original developer, West Meadows Associates, from its escrow fund of $331,000. After nearly three years of delay, the borough took over the project from West Meadows Associates under an agreement signed early this fall.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | By Stephen C. Row, Special to The Inquirer
The Bensalem Council has given developer Alan Sobel until Sept. 16 to meet several conditions originally stipulated in the township's approval of his Bucks County Estates subdivision. If the conditions are not met, officials said, the township will assume responsibility for the completion of the project, using funds placed in escrow by Sobel. "The township has undertaken (completion of) several developments recently," said Barbara Barnes, the council chairwoman. "I'm tired of empty promises.
NEWS
July 28, 1989 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
And now, new hope for commuters who have sweated, fretted, fumed or simply waited patiently in stop-and-go traffic on the Schuylkill Expressway: The $200 million reconstruction project that has been under way for more than four years might be finished by Labor Day. Meeting such a deadline would be finishing the project early, since the current schedule calls for completion by Sept. 18. Nevertheless, state Department of Transportation officials and the contractors, I.A. Construction Corp.
NEWS
October 8, 1996 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After months of following detour signs, dodging orange barrels and driving on bumpy roads, Lower Bucks travelers can soon celebrate the full opening of Route 213. PennDot officials said both lanes should be open by the end of next week. "Right now, weather permitting, we hope to have the road open the week of Oct. 14," said Gene Blaum, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. That is good news for motorists who have waited for Route 213 to be completed since work started in May 1995.
NEWS
June 15, 2010
Officials Monday celebrated the near-completion of a housing development in Southwest Philadelphia that will provide 63 affordable apartments to veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq and their families. The townhouse-style complex of seven buildings in the 6200 block of Eastwick Avenue includes the Robert Brady Sr. Veterans Center, where veterans can get access to services and the community can hold meetings. - Thomas Fitzgerald
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Nutter and other local officials today celebrated the $30 million rehabbing of two Broad Street Line subway stations, marking the end of 32 SEPTA projects funded with $191 million in federal stimulus grants. Noting that 507 jobs were created by the upgrades to the Spring Garden and Girard stations, Nutter said "this is what infrastructure renewal is all about. " The overhaul was the first ever for the 1920s-era stations. Workers installed elevators and new stairs, new lighting and signage, new cashier booths and fare lines, new power and fire-suppression systems, repaired floors and ceilings and installed colorful artwork commissioned for the stations.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1986 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
A confident Philadelphia Electric Co. chairman yesterday said that the utility had "turned the corner" on construction of its Limerick nuclear plant and was on its way toward completing the controversial $7 billion power station by the current target date of late 1990. James L. Everett told security dealers and analysts that "we're on the downslope of the hill" at Limerick, with one unit in operation and the second close to half-finished. "We can see some light at the end of the tunnel, and we don't think it's train coming the other way," Everett said.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
A second frame supporting the roof of Philadelphia's Academy of Music has been found seriously damaged, and more severely than one that had been found damaged earlier, the Academy's engineering consultant disclosed yesterday. The bottom crosspiece, or chord, of the frame - technically known as a truss - was found to be completely fractured, said the consultant, Nicholas L. Gianopulos. "You could almost put your hand through it," he said. The injury to the truss, called T-2, was discovered April 3, Gianopulos said, five days after less severe damage was found in an adjacent truss, T-3. The trusses are made of two 6-inch-wide, 14-inch-deep beams fastened together side by side.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The roar of backhoes has added a noisy note to springtime at Swarthmore College as the school launches a $25 million construction project. The project, which was to have an official groundbreaking ceremony today, will dramatically change the northern part of campus when it is completed in 1998. The Parrish annex, now used mostly for faculty offices, will be razed and replaced by a new academic building that will house the departments of economics, modern languages and sociology/anthropology, plus 44 faculty offices, 13 classrooms, and seminar rooms.
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SPORTS
January 12, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
It was just one small play in a one-sided basketball game, one January moment that will be forgotten as the schedule grinds toward March, but it was Ryan Arcidiacono's favorite of the day on Saturday at the Pavilion. DePaul guards Durrell McDonald and Billy Garrett Jr. were trying to advance the ball out of the backcourt against trapping pressure when McDonald made a hurried pass that caught Garrett on a short hop, and Garrett bobbled it ever so slightly as he reached down to pull it in. It was nothing really, a momentary lapse, but it was enough of an opening for Arcidiacono to close in on Garrett, dive at his feet, and knock the ball to the far end of the court.
NEWS
January 6, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lucky few chosen from thousands of applicants soon will be able to call the Riverfront Village in Pennsauken their new home. With construction expected to finish ahead of schedule, the first tenants could begin moving into their new digs in February, said Nick Cangelosi, a project manager for Conifer L.L.C., the construction and management company overseeing the project. "It's moving quickly," Cangelosi said in an interview last week. Construction began in March and was expected to take at least 12 months.
SPORTS
January 3, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
What Howie wants, Howie gets. There is no other conclusion to draw from the Eagles' dismissal of Tom Gamble, formerly their vice president of player personnel, formerly the man in the franchise's front office whom Chip Kelly respected most, formerly a thorn who apparently pricked general manager Howie Roseman one too many times. For years now, there really has been no other conclusion to draw about the power structure within the Eagles organization. Roseman has owner Jeffrey Lurie's ear. Lurie trusts him. Lurie puts him first.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When I moved to Philadelphia in 1999, I knew I had a great deal to learn: how to navigate from Pashunk to the Skookl, the Boulevard to the Parkway; the right way to order a Yuengling (a lager); and the correct usage of jawn (OK, that I still don't really understand). Now that I've been here, on and off, for 15 years, I'm starting to wonder: Am I a true Phuluffyan yet? Given that I still sometimes order a sub at a hoagie shop, the answer seems to be, "Not quite. " So, 2015 is the year I'll aim to make it official.
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The Showboat's transformation from a Mardi Gras-themed gambling destination into a college campus can now begin. Richard Stockton College announced Friday that it had completed a deal, made public last month, to purchase the Boardwalk casino-hotel for $18 million. Showboat is one of four casinos - along with Atlantic Club, Revel, and Trump Plaza - that have closed this year in the struggling resort. Atlantic Club and Revel are still actively looking to secure buyers, while the city has plans to implode Trump Plaza.
NEWS
December 9, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRICK TOWNSHIP, N.J. - You won't be able to see it when it's finished, because the seawall that extends three and a half miles through two beach towns will be covered in sand and is being rooted 30 feet below sea level. It will act as an invisible barrier against future storms such as Hurricane Sandy along a stretch of the Jersey Shore that was arguably the most devastated by the October 29, 2012, storm that did $38 billion worth of damage in the state. The new steel seawall lines a beach-ward section of Route 35 and runs through Mantoloking and the Normandy Beach section of Brick Township.
SPORTS
December 4, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mark Sanchez has completed 63.4 percent of his passes this season, which is a significant improvement from his four seasons with the Jets. But he is still not completely satisfied with his accuracy, even though he never had a completion percentage better than 56.7 in New York. He wants it to be closer to his preseason, when he completed 80.7 percent of his passes. That might not be realistic - the top 10 quarterbacks in the league are between 65.1 and 70.3 percent - but Sanchez thinks there have been incompletions that should have been completions.
REAL_ESTATE
December 1, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the corner of Haddon and Powell Avenues in Collingswood, you can pop into Collings North, the newly opened final phase of a development in the town's center. And soon, you'll also be able to pop in to visit the developer himself. Brad Ingerman, whose company's headquarters are moving from Cherry Hill, will occupy the ground floor, potentially for a long time. "We're not flippers, we build and hold," Ingerman says. "Fifteen years is our minimum holding period. We still own two-thirds of our projects.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | By Daniel Webster, For The Inquirer
China's global economic expansion has been slow to include a matching rise in cultural institutions among its exports, but Friday brought a major step toward changing that when a youthful orchestra from Beijing played an internationally televised concert at the Kimmel Center. The concert by the NCPA Orchestra had special resonance here, because the Philadelphia Orchestra played in 1973 in a nation that had once put its musicians in coal mines and closed universities and conservatories but was cautiously peering over its cultural wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
British photographer and writer-director Joanna Hogg spent her formative years working with some of the leading lights of London's film scene: Her mentor, Jim Jarman, helped her on an early film that won her a place at the National Film and Television School, where she cast a young Tilda Swinton as the lead of her graduation short. After a spell as a TV director, she made her feature debut with 2007's Unrelated , an intimate portrayal of upper-middle-class Brits on vacation in Tuscany, a setting that inspires their repressed sexual and destructive urges.
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