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Completion

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BUSINESS
September 22, 1987 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
After two developers and three lawsuits in five years, the former Rittenhouse Place hotel and condominium project is at last set for completion. The president of Ameribass Realty Co. of Philadelphia, David Marshall, said today the company will spend $100 million over the next two years to complete the unfinished project. Construction will begin in October. The project, to be known as The Rittenhouse, will include a 100-room hotel and 200 luxury condominium units. The building will also contain a health club and two restaurants.
NEWS
November 8, 1990 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
Long-stalled public improvements in the West Meadows development in West Grove are under way and some are even ahead of schedule, according to the engineer managing the project. Stephen Woodward, the borough's engineering consultant, said at a meeting Monday that the project was expected to cost $210,000, to be paid by the original developer, West Meadows Associates, from its escrow fund of $331,000. After nearly three years of delay, the borough took over the project from West Meadows Associates under an agreement signed early this fall.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | By Stephen C. Row, Special to The Inquirer
The Bensalem Council has given developer Alan Sobel until Sept. 16 to meet several conditions originally stipulated in the township's approval of his Bucks County Estates subdivision. If the conditions are not met, officials said, the township will assume responsibility for the completion of the project, using funds placed in escrow by Sobel. "The township has undertaken (completion of) several developments recently," said Barbara Barnes, the council chairwoman. "I'm tired of empty promises.
NEWS
July 28, 1989 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
And now, new hope for commuters who have sweated, fretted, fumed or simply waited patiently in stop-and-go traffic on the Schuylkill Expressway: The $200 million reconstruction project that has been under way for more than four years might be finished by Labor Day. Meeting such a deadline would be finishing the project early, since the current schedule calls for completion by Sept. 18. Nevertheless, state Department of Transportation officials and the contractors, I.A. Construction Corp.
NEWS
October 8, 1996 | By Jennifer Inez Ward, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After months of following detour signs, dodging orange barrels and driving on bumpy roads, Lower Bucks travelers can soon celebrate the full opening of Route 213. PennDot officials said both lanes should be open by the end of next week. "Right now, weather permitting, we hope to have the road open the week of Oct. 14," said Gene Blaum, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. That is good news for motorists who have waited for Route 213 to be completed since work started in May 1995.
NEWS
June 15, 2010
Officials Monday celebrated the near-completion of a housing development in Southwest Philadelphia that will provide 63 affordable apartments to veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq and their families. The townhouse-style complex of seven buildings in the 6200 block of Eastwick Avenue includes the Robert Brady Sr. Veterans Center, where veterans can get access to services and the community can hold meetings. - Thomas Fitzgerald
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Nutter and other local officials today celebrated the $30 million rehabbing of two Broad Street Line subway stations, marking the end of 32 SEPTA projects funded with $191 million in federal stimulus grants. Noting that 507 jobs were created by the upgrades to the Spring Garden and Girard stations, Nutter said "this is what infrastructure renewal is all about. " The overhaul was the first ever for the 1920s-era stations. Workers installed elevators and new stairs, new lighting and signage, new cashier booths and fare lines, new power and fire-suppression systems, repaired floors and ceilings and installed colorful artwork commissioned for the stations.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1986 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
A confident Philadelphia Electric Co. chairman yesterday said that the utility had "turned the corner" on construction of its Limerick nuclear plant and was on its way toward completing the controversial $7 billion power station by the current target date of late 1990. James L. Everett told security dealers and analysts that "we're on the downslope of the hill" at Limerick, with one unit in operation and the second close to half-finished. "We can see some light at the end of the tunnel, and we don't think it's train coming the other way," Everett said.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
A second frame supporting the roof of Philadelphia's Academy of Music has been found seriously damaged, and more severely than one that had been found damaged earlier, the Academy's engineering consultant disclosed yesterday. The bottom crosspiece, or chord, of the frame - technically known as a truss - was found to be completely fractured, said the consultant, Nicholas L. Gianopulos. "You could almost put your hand through it," he said. The injury to the truss, called T-2, was discovered April 3, Gianopulos said, five days after less severe damage was found in an adjacent truss, T-3. The trusses are made of two 6-inch-wide, 14-inch-deep beams fastened together side by side.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The roar of backhoes has added a noisy note to springtime at Swarthmore College as the school launches a $25 million construction project. The project, which was to have an official groundbreaking ceremony today, will dramatically change the northern part of campus when it is completed in 1998. The Parrish annex, now used mostly for faculty offices, will be razed and replaced by a new academic building that will house the departments of economics, modern languages and sociology/anthropology, plus 44 faculty offices, 13 classrooms, and seminar rooms.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Where other people see blemishes, Andrew Jevremovic tends to see potential. That goes for Pennsylvania maple that's gnarled and peppered with knots. The flaws make it more difficult to work with, but also more beautiful, said the sculptor and furniture-maker behind Octo Studio. Running a hand over a log that has been cut into thick slabs: "This maple, if it was sanded up, it's pretty mind-blowing stuff," he said. It's also true of the gritty stretch of Alter Street in Point Breeze where Jevremovic, 54, and his wife, River Algiers Trappler, 48, have lived since 2000.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Prospect Medical Holdings Inc. completed its $300 million acquisition of Crozer-Keystone Health System, the Los Angeles company said Friday. Prospect, which now owns 18 hospitals in California, Texas, Rhode Island, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, said it offered jobs to "all Crozer-Keystone employees and management in good standing who are current as of the closing date. " Crozer, with about 6,000 employees, is Delaware County's largest employer, officials have said. Prospect, majority owned by private-equity firm Leonard Green & Partners, had $1.3 billion in revenue in the year ended Sept.
SPORTS
June 26, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
SAN FRANCISCO - Four years ago, when Edubray Ramos was a teenager in Venezuela painting cars and cleaning floors, this day was inconceivable. The day that Ramos walked into a big-league clubhouse to find a No. 61 Phillies jersey with his name on the back. "I was out of baseball," Ramos said through an interpreter. "It was impossible for me to imagine that. It's a beautiful moment for me. " Ramos, 23, did not receive a signing bonus when the Phillies plucked him from an adult baseball league three years after the St. Louis Cardinals had released him. Now, not only is he in the majors, but Ramos is a legitimate prospect to one day become a closer.
NEWS
June 1, 2016 | By Steve Bohnel, Staff Writer
JUST MORE than a mile north of Temple University, a 21,000-square-foot mosque is rising next to a struggling neighborhood in North Philadelphia. The 56-foot-tall structure stands on a former factory lot, next to Amtrak's main line that rolls through the neighborhood. The mosque, on West Glenwood Avenue near 13th Street, will serve Philadelphia's Ahmadiyya Muslim Community and its growing membership, said Bilal Salaam, its imam. It was designed by Olaya Studio, and was based on the White Minaret, an iconic symbol that represents the Ahmadiyya community in Qadian, India.
SPORTS
April 30, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
WASHINGTON - Cameron Rupp roared into second base on Thursday evening and pounded his fists. The Phillies finally found a run, breaking a scoreless tie in the ninth inning against one of baseball's top teams. Rupp skied a fly ball that soared past the reach of Bryce Harper and fell into deep right field, scoring the winning run of a 3-0 victory over the Washington Nationals. The Phillies - the team picked to finish as one of baseball's worst teams - had shocked the first-place Nationals again, completing a three-game sweep at Nationals Park.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
Bancroft, a historic presence in Haddonfield, has finalized its acquisition of 80 acres in Mount Laurel, school officials announced this week. "It's the closing of the sale, so the property is ours," Bancroft spokeswoman Lori Shaffer said Wednesday. The Burlington County site will be home to the relocated Bancroft School, as well as the Lindens Center for Autism, residences, an enrichment and training institute, and new programs for recreation, socialization, and technical opportunities for children and adults.
SPORTS
April 6, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
Joel Embiid is back from Qatar, and, according to the 76ers, the center's second trip there was a success. Embiid spent the last two weeks at Aspetar, an orthopedic and sports medicine hospital in Doha, Qatar. This was his second time at the world-renowned facility that serves as the official sports medicine partner of French soccer club Paris Saint-Germain. His first trip was in February around the NBA all-star break. This time, the Sixers sent a doctor, David Martin; head of strength and conditioning Todd Wright; player development assistant Chris Babcock; and player development staffer Curtis Sumpter to Qatar to work with Embiid.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
King of Prussia-based O'Neill Properties Group has completed environmental remediation work at the central New Jersey site where it plans a $2.2 billion mixed-use development known as The Pointe. The company plans to begin work on the project's first retail space - a 200,000-square-foot Bass Pro Shops store - in the spring, O'Neill Properties said in a release on Wednesday. The remediation work at the former National Lead Co. manufacturing site in Sayreville, Middlesex County, cost $8 million, with the pad on which the Bass Pro store will be built costing another $3 million, O'Neill Properties said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: I caught my husband cheating. We've started couple's counseling. The counselor told him he needed to let me ask all my questions about the affair, and we had that conversation at home. I do feel better now, but he was evasive on a few of the questions: "Did you tell her you loved her?" (he dodged, unconvincingly), and, "Who initiated the affair?" (he doesn't know I know it was a lie to say she did). How much of a red flag is this?
NEWS
February 29, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Andrew Seidman, and Allison Steele, STAFF WRITERS
Just a month before the Philadelphia mayoral primary last year, the Carpenters' union in New Jersey used a circuitous route to funnel $725,000 to a group supporting Jim Kenney's candidacy. The donation baffled local political observers, who did not know what to make of the out-of-state branch openly challenging Ed Coryell Sr., the longtime leader of the Carpenters in Philadelphia who was backing Kenney's chief rival, State Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams. Now, given Coryell's unexpected ouster from union leadership, last year's primary plot twist highlights a power struggle involving unseen political forces, the movement of campaign funds from New Jersey to Washington, D.C., to the Philadelphia mayor's race and a simmering civil war between unions at the Convention Center.
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