CollectionsComposer
IN THE NEWS

Composer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 3, 2012
Abram Wilson, 38, an acclaimed jazz trumpeter and composer from New Orleans who helped lead a new generation of jazz artists in Britain, performing as a kind of cultural attache from the jazz homeland, died June 9 in London. He died several days after suspending a concert tour and checking into a hospital with stomach pains, his wife, Jennie Cashman, said. The cause was cancer, she said. Mr. Wilson, who was raised in New Orleans and steeped in its hybrid musical traditions, was known for combining musical forms.
NEWS
July 9, 2011
Billy Blanco, a veteran Bossa Nova composer, died Friday in a Rio de Janeiro hospital from complications of a stroke he suffered in October. Mr. Blanco was at the heart of the Bossa Nova movement when it bloomed in the early 1960s. He wrote more than 300 songs and collaborated with the genre's biggest names, such as Tom Jobim, Joao Gilberto, and Baden Powell. Blanco was known as the "Diamond of Bossa Nova. " He was born in the Amazon jungle city of Belem, but migrated south to Sao Paulo as a young man to study architecture.
NEWS
June 9, 2011
Andrew Gold, 59, a singer, musician, and composer whose songs included the 1977 hit "Lonely Boy," died in his sleep Friday at his home in Encino, Calif., said his sister, Melani Gold Friedman. She said he had cancer but had been responding to treatment. Mr. Gold was a multi-instrumental player whose popular singles included "Thank You for Being a Friend" and the British hit "Never Let Her Slip Away. " He was in Linda Ronstadt's band, arranged songs for and performed on several Ronstadt albums, including Heart Like a Wheel , and did session work for artists such as James Taylor and Carly Simon.
NEWS
June 27, 2011
Television and film music composer Fred Steiner, 88, creator of the bold and gritty theme for the Perry Mason TV series and one of the composers of the Oscar-nominated score for The Color Purple , died of natural causes Thursday at his home in the town of Ajijic in the Mexican state of Jalisco, according to his daughter Wendy Waldman, a singer-songwriter. One of the busiest composers working in Hollywood in the 1950s and '60s, Mr. Steiner also crafted music for Gunsmoke ; The Twilight Zone ; Star Trek ; Have Gun, Will Travel ; Rawhide ; Hogan's Heroes ; and other TV series.
NEWS
April 12, 2011
Mexican composer Daniel Catan, 62, who adapted the Italian film Il Postino to opera, died Friday while working on a new opera in Austin, Texas, a University of Texas spokeswoman said Monday. The cause of death Friday was not immediately released. Mr. Catan was best known in the United States for his operatic adaptation of Il Postino, which is sung in Spanish. The Los Angeles Opera premiered Il Postino last year with Placido Domingo playing the poet Pablo Neruda and tenor Charles Castronovo as the wide-eyed postman Mario Ruoppolo.
NEWS
November 23, 2012
Richard Robbins, 71, the composer who created memorable scores for such films as A Room With a View , Howards End , and The Remains of the Day during a quarter-century collaboration with director James Ivory and producer Ismail Merchant, died Nov. 7 in Rhinebeck, N.Y., of Parkinson's disease, said Michael Schell, his longtime partner. Mr. Robbins created the score for nearly every Merchant-Ivory film from The Europeans in 1979 to The White Countess in 2005. He earned back-to-back Academy Award nominations in 1992 and 1993 for his original music for Merchant-Ivory productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2012 | By Mary SYDNOR and For the Daily News
AUGUST RODIN is generally considered the father of modern sculpture, though his works reference the classical sculpture of ancient Greece and Rome. That balance of old and new is reflected in the just-reopened Rodin Museum on the Parkway. As part of its summer concert series, the museum commissioned contemporary French composer Philippe Hurel to create three pieces, called "Spectral Impressions," that will be performed Saturday in the museum's sculpture garden by the Argento Chamber Ensemble.
NEWS
February 15, 2012
Dory Previn Shannon, 86, who helped write the score for the film Valley of the Dolls " and the theme for Last Tango in Paris , has died. According to her husband, Joby Baker, she died Tuesday of natural causes at her farm in Southfield, Mass. She earned Oscar nominations in the 1960s for writing lyrics alongside Andre Previn's music for the films Pepe and Two for the Seesaw . She and Previn were married from 1959 to 1970. She won an Emmy in 1984 for cowriting the theme song for the TV show Two of a Kind . She sang at Carnegie Hall, wrote a libretto for Mozart's opera The Impresario and recorded many albums.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Henri Dutilleux, 97, a composer whose modest output belied his huge impact on listeners and musicians alike, died Wednesday in Paris, European news services reported. Mr. Dutilleux, born in Angers and trained at the Paris Conservatory, maintained a compositional link with Debussy and Ravel while taking their economy and elegance to greater levels of complexity and dissonance. Conductor Charles Dutoit, a Dutilleux champion who led several notable premieres, said that his death, though expected, was a major loss.
NEWS
November 8, 2012 | By Deepti Hajela, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The composer Elliott Carter, 103, whose challenging and rhythmically complex works earned him widespread admiration and two Pulitzer Prizes, died Monday. In a 1992 interview, Mr. Carter described his works as "music that asks to be listened to in a concentrated way and listened to with a great deal of attention. It's not music that makes an overt theatrical effect, but it assumes the listener is listening to sounds and making some sense out of them. " The complex way that the different instruments interact in his compositions created drama for listeners who made the effort to understand them, but it made them difficult for orchestras to learn.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though not inclined to look back, the Crossing choir and its founder/director, Donald Nally, have roughly 10 years of mutual history, which explains why Sunday's opening of the annual Month of Moderns festival at the Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill was often retrospective, if never tame. Some Crossing followers might have been shocked that two pieces dated to the 1990s, the more substantial being David Shapiro's A Century of Aprils , a Mass setting of sorts, that was written for one of Nally's previous choirs, the Bridge Ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2015 | By Matthew Westphal, For The Inquirer
Piffaro, Philadelphia's Renaissance wind band, celebrated a big anniversary this weekend. Not its own 30th (that's next season), but the 500th birthday of perhaps the most influential composer you've never heard of: Cipriano de Rore, the first to deliberately shape his music to the meaning and rhythm of the text being sung rather than using the words mostly as pegs for constructions of notes. With that change in emphasis, Rore transformed vocal music and made possible the birth of opera in the following century.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though successful female composers are now in the majority in Philadelphia, Margaret Garwood, 88, who died Sunday, May 3, from acute heart failure at her Wyncote home, composed numerous operas at a time when few women did so, and continued on an individualistic path with the 2010 premiere of The Scarlet Letter . Ms. Garwood came to composing relatively late in life, at age 35, after the breakup of her marriage to the composer Romeo Cascariono and...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Lars Vogt was well on his way to making a significant solo recital debut Wednesday at the American Philosophical Society when Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 32 Op. 111 started coming unraveled. Problems began in the dense, first-movement exposition, when a memory lapse set in, one that Vogt covered skillfully, but starting a spiral that eventually forced him to start over and ultimately leave the stage to grab the printed music. Even more unfortunately, the music stand on the piano had been removed, making page turns awkward.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The composer usually is first to come aboard, even in the most unconventional operas. However, the appointment of Opera Philadelphia's now-in-process ANDY: A Popera composer Dan Visconti was only announced this week - for a piece that has already had public workshop performances by the Philadelphia cabaret group the Bearded Ladies. "It's great to taste ways of working that are foreign to classical composers," said the 32-year-old Chicagoan. Director John Jarboe called the collaboration "radical . . . in form and process.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
DAVE APPELL once told an interviewer, "I hear music in my head 24 hours a day. " Far from looking for a shrink to get those notes out of his brain, Dave capitalized on his passion in a long career of making music, his kind of music, the kind that gets your fingers snapping and your feet stomping. Like "Let's Twist Again," which he wrote for Chubby Checker. Or the iconic "Tie a Yellow Ribbon 'Round the Old Oak Tree," which never fails to provoke a tear down the cheek. Over the years, the performers Dave worked with would fill a book on the musical history of the grooving 1950s and '60s - Chubby Checker, Dee Dee Sharp, Bobby Rydell, the Dovells, the Orlons, and later Tony Orlando and Dawn.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Ah, that's more like it. The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia found its autumn-season legs, a little late, in a program featuring the orchestra's brilliant principal violist, Ayane Kozasa, and a surprise from music director Dirk Brossé - not the usual bonbon, but an Arvo Pärt piece that was the best thing on the program, and possibly one of the season's highlights. The Japanese-born, Curtis Institute-educated Kozasa may not be a revelation to juries of the competitions she has won, but she was new to this listener, having been deterred from her December 2013 Astral Artists recital by one of many blizzards.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Jazz pianist/composer Uri Caine's many years gone from his native Philadelphia are melting away, into a kind of music he wasn't taught at the University of Pennsylvania, and in places his colleagues don't typically navigate. His The Passion of Octavius Catto , a jazz/gospel oratorio about the martyred Philadelphia civil rights leader, will have its world premiere Saturday at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts. It is being rehearsed at the historic St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church in what's called in hip-hop circles "the O-Zone" (Olney)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
How often is the best-known composer on a modern-music program the least significant? By far? So it was at Saturday's part two of the Month of Moderns festival when the Crossing choir began its concert at Crane Arts with Eric Whitacre. Though he's an international star among choral-music composers, his lovely Sainte-Chapelle was outclassed by locals, and not ones you might expect. One is always happy when local composers do great work. But blindfold tests on the new works by Robert Maggio, James Primosch, and Frances White would have proved their considerable worth whatever their geographical affiliations.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In what seems like a monthly new-opera announcement, Opera Philadelphia appointed its fourth composer in residence, this time one with a considerable operatic track record already: David T. Little. Based in Weehawken, N.J., and Winchester, Va. (where he teaches at Shenandoah University), Little is best known for the opera Dog Days that made several critics' best-of-the-year lists in 2012, and is currently working on JFK for a premiere by the Forth Worth Opera. "I came to opera indirectly and what I learned, I learned by doing.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|