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Compulsive Gambling

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NEWS
March 24, 1986 | By Fen Montaigne, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first study of compulsive gambling in the Philadelphia metropolitan area estimates that there are at least 123,000 pathological gamblers in the region and 150,000 more potential compulsive gamblers who already suffer some effects from the disorder. In total, about 273,000 people - 7.5 percent of the adult population of the region - show some signs of a gambling problem, the study estimates. The scientific telephone survey was commissioned by a Northeast Philadelphia mental-health agency, PATH, and was conducted by Rutgers University.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Council on Compulsive Gambling of New Jersey Inc., a nonprofit that attempts to educate the public on the potential problems of gambling, appointed Neva Pryor as executive director. Before joining the Hamilton, N.J., nonprofit, Pryor was gambling supervisor with the Office of Addiction Services for the City of Philadelphia. The council had $975,553 in revenue in the year ended June 30, 2014, most of it from government grants, according to its most recent tax return. hbrubaker@phillynews.com 215-854-4651 @InqBrubaker  
SPORTS
December 18, 1996 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
The betting started in the ninth grade. Just the weekly football pools at first. Then came the $25 single-game bet. For the high school freshman, it was a big win, and a big hook. "That's when I started betting on the football games," Ken said. "I liked the idea of making fast money. " Fast money. That was the key. All the Overbrook teenager had to do to make that extra cash, that ticket to the good life, was make the right bets. But he made more wrong bets than right ones, and the debts piled up. He bet just to try to make up for the losses.
NEWS
March 26, 2000 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tony Milillo is talking to an audience of high school seniors about a little-heard addiction: gambling. He asks a volunteer to name a younger sibling. "Lauren," says one boy, naming his 7-year-old sister. "On Christmas morning, do you think grandparents would put a bag of cocaine in Lauren's stocking?" Milillo asks. The students laugh and shake their heads at the ridiculous suggestion. "A bottle of scotch?" More titters. Milillo pauses for dramatic effect.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In a unanimous free-speech ruling, the Supreme Court concluded yesterday that private non-Indian casinos are entitled to advertise gambling activities on radio and television - despite the Clinton administration's warnings that such ads would encourage compulsive gambling. The justices, acting on a case from New Orleans, nullified a federal law that permitted states and Indian tribes to broadcast ads for their gambling enterprises, but barred private owners of casinos from doing the same thing.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
At 26, JoAnn Ciurlino hit rock bottom. She blacked out one evening, and when she woke up, she was in the Starting Point detoxification center in Mount Holly. She was there because she was an addict - addicted to drugs, to alcohol and to gambling. Her days before Starting Point were spent tending bar - when she showed up for work at all. Nights were spent in Atlantic City, drinking and playing blackjack. To all the world, she was the epitome of the swinging single woman, living life in the fast lane.
NEWS
July 20, 1991 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Compulsive gambling is an insidious disease that can create criminals. Everyone in a Camden courtroom yesterday agreed that was what happened to James Howard. Howard, a casino worker who had confessed to holding the teenage son of a prominent Atlantic City businessman for ransom, told a federal judge at his sentencing that his gambling habit had driven him to commit the crime. The head of the state compulsive gambling association told the judge that 400,000 New Jerseyans were similarly afflicted and asked for leniency.
NEWS
January 31, 1994 | BY B. KENNETH NELSON
The tremendous growth in gambling in this country is undeniable. In 1982, Americans spent $126 billion in legal bets; in 1992 that figure reached $330 billion. In the wake of the Super Bowl, the single biggest betting event each year, it's a good idea to take stock of betting behavior. Most people gamble for entertainment with money from discretionary income. But there's an increasing number of individuals unable to control their gambling behavior. While social gamblers bet with a fixed amount and stop when they run out of recreational dollars, problem gamblers continue to bet beyond their leisure budget.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Sometimes, Congress wants it both ways. The House Armed Services Committee acknowledges in a report that compulsive gambling is a serious and growing problem among military personnel, and it calls on the Pentagon to deal with it. Just 64 pages away, the committee makes another suggestion: that the Pentagon consider establishing a lottery on overseas military bases to boost morale. While congressional and defense officials guffawed when the apparent inconsistency was pointed out to them, Capitol Hill staff members said the incongruity is not as stark as it might first appear.
NEWS
June 28, 2001 | By Kay Raftery INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Anthony Milillo Jr., 62, of Audubon, a counselor on compulsive gambling at the Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment, a wing of Albert Einstein Medical Center, died of heart disease Monday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Milillo was also executive director of the Council on Compulsive Gambling of Pennsylvania and editor of Keystone Corner, a newsletter on the problems of gambling. He lectured frequently on gambling and in 1994, with Rep. Paul Clymer, presented a report on gambling to the Pennsylvania Legislature in Harrisburg.
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BUSINESS
May 22, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Council on Compulsive Gambling of New Jersey Inc., a nonprofit that attempts to educate the public on the potential problems of gambling, appointed Neva Pryor as executive director. Before joining the Hamilton, N.J., nonprofit, Pryor was gambling supervisor with the Office of Addiction Services for the City of Philadelphia. The council had $975,553 in revenue in the year ended June 30, 2014, most of it from government grants, according to its most recent tax return. hbrubaker@phillynews.com 215-854-4651 @InqBrubaker  
SPORTS
January 29, 2015 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Columnist
ARNIE WEXLER will not watch a minute of Super Bowl XLIX. Not the anthem, sung in a crisp 2:03 by Idina Menzel. Not the coin toss, heads. Not the halftime show with Katy Perry, who will sing "Roar. " Not the babbling-head, overinflated pregame, halftime, postgame shows. Arnie Wexler is a recovering gambling addict and does not dare trigger feelings of temptation, even though the last bet he made was April 10, 1968. "The Super Bowl to a recovering gambler," he grumbled, "is like New Year's Eve to a recovering alcoholic.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
YESTERDAY'S gruesome developments along the Schuylkill, said by cops to be possibly linked to Asian drug gangs, was not the first time Asian gang violence has made news in Philadelphia. In 2012, Sophos Siv, 40, was tied up, beaten and shot in his Olney home. A gunbattle over his killing ensued this year between reported Cambodian gang members. In 2005, five or six Asian men wearing bandannas drove through South Philly and opened fire, killing Angel Mucciolo, 18, a bystander. The case was believed to be gang-related.
NEWS
November 27, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
If it is true, as research has suggested, that people who live within 10 miles of a casino are twice as likely as others to become addicted to gambling, what happens if casino gambling is as close as a laptop computer - or a smartphone? New Jersey is about to find out. Thirteen online gambling sites sponsored by six Atlantic City casinos received a green light to open to the public and start advertising to gamblers at 12:01 a.m. Tuesday, the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement said Monday.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - Gov. Christie made regulatory oversight - especially safeguards for those who are underage and additional funding for treatment of compulsive gamblers - key to his signing off on the bill that legalized Internet gaming in New Jersey. On Wednesday, a forum on "Responsible Gambling for the Future" at the Statehouse Annex, far from the glamour and glitz of Atlantic City, addressed those issues and others. The forum's goal, said Donald Weinbaum, executive director of the Council on Compulsive Gambling of New Jersey, was to come up with a tenable five-year work plan among all sectors involved as gaming options proliferate - a process that "will ultimately lead to an expanded system of prevention, awareness, early intervention, and treatment services for persons at risk of gambling addiction.
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
TRENTON - New Jerseyans would be able to bet on sports games using their home computers or smartphones under a proposal making its way through the Legislature. Though the sports-betting measure was designed to drive customers to casinos and tracks - with hopes they would then gamble on table games and slots or wager on horses - the legislation also would allow state residents at least 21 years old to use computers or electronic handheld devices to bet on sports games, as long as the individuals were physically in the state.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2011 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Profits and parenting are on a collision course at Parx Casino. Becoming the quintessential "neighborhood casino" has given Parx the dubious distinction of being the only gambling hall in Pennsylvania where adults have been caught leaving children in vehicles parked outside while they gambled inside. The increasingly tense clash of parental responsibility and casino accountability could be taken up Aug. 18 before the state Gaming Control Board in Harrisburg. Thus far, no fines have been levied on Parx because of recurring incidents of child neglect by its patrons.
NEWS
September 21, 2010 | By NATALIE POMPILIO, pompiln@phillynews.com 215-854-2595
SugarHouse Casino opened its door to gamblers yesterday, hosting an invitation-only event with proceeds benefiting four local charities. "If you get through the first 15 minutes, you're off to a good start," SugarHouse General Manager Wendy Hamilton said. "We got through the first 15 minutes. " All of the casino's earnings from the two-day trial - yesterday and tomorrow - will be split equally by the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania, the Fraternal Order of Police Survivor's Fund, Greater Philadelphia Traditions Fund and the Philadelphia Veterans Multi-Service & Education Center.
NEWS
June 8, 2010
When Parx casino officials joined other slots-parlor operators in 2008 to beat back a Harrisburg proposal that they issue their regular customers monthly gambling statements, the Bensalem casino pledged that Parx would "continue to identify quickly" anyone who showed problem gambling or drinking habits. But it looks as if Parx missed a high roller who, Montgomery County authorities say, had no business frequenting the Bucks County slots joint. In May, former Jenkintown tax collector Michael H. O'Neill, 50, was charged with blowing nearly $182,000 in tax receipts at Parx during a yearlong gambling binge.
NEWS
October 30, 2008
The legalization of slots in Pennsylvania has certainly helped to boost tax revenue - as advertised by Gov. Rendell and others who supported the expansion of gambling. But often overlooked in the rush to count the tax "winnings" is that the state-sanctioned slots racket comes with heavy costs. Along with the tax benefits, slots gambling is wreaking havoc on many lives, including residents who can ill afford to gamble, as Inquirer reporter Suzette Parmley detailed Sunday. Granted, since the first slots parlor opened in November 2006, Pennsylvania has raked in $1.8 billion in revenue.
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