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NEWS
February 28, 1991 | By Michele McCreary, Special to The Inquirer
New computer programs dealing with Homer's Odyssey and Shakespeare's Hamlet soon will be added to the resources of the New Hope-Solebury School District. The programs are included in a $45,000 package of computer-related spending approved Monday by the school board. The district will acquire eight new IBM computer terminals for the math- science lab at the high school and one Macintosh computer for the elementary school. It is buying software dealing with, among other subjects, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Christopher Columbus and Shakespeare's plays.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Sony Corp. yesterday unveiled a book-sized portable computer with no keyboard that can read letters handwritten on its screen in English or Japanese. Sony described the PalmTop PTC-500 as a significant breakthrough that could make personal computers as common as Walkman portable stereos. "This machine has historical significance," said Toshi Doi, director of Sony's microcomputer group. "The product is targeted for a far wider range of potential users in the coming era of a computer for everyone.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
You say Cmdr. Data, that walking, talking, thinking android with a neuron computer for a brain on Star Trek: The Next Generation is only fiction? Well, OK, he is . . . for now. But watch out. There is a neuron computer at the University of Pennsylvania that does a lot of dazzling Data-like - make that, human-like - tricks. It can recognize images and sounds and generalize about them, just as you do when you recognize a friend's face - or voice - and say hello. Sure, you can run into somebody who looks or sounds so much like your friend, you're mistaken.
NEWS
December 28, 1986 | By Janet Ruth Falon, Special to The Inquirer
Once, while among a group of knowledgeable personal-computer types who were observing a demonstration of some new software, I innocently asked, "What's the difference between a data base and a spreadsheet?" And while my naive query and obvious computer illiteracy drew some snooty raised eyebrows, a kindly college kid (wearing a T-shirt with a drawing of a vampire saying "I want a byte") took me aside and explained, in simple English, the answer to my very basic question. I wish to report that I have since become savvy.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
Edward Godfrey, 32, sat before his Gold Star PC in the Gloucester County College computer laboratory in Deptford and struck a command key. The computer gurgled. In quick succession, Godfrey typed a series of strokes: A/ ENTER. A/1 - ACCOUNTING PROGRAM, the computer wrote on the screen. And then it spoke to Godfrey. "You have entered accounting program A slash 1," it said in a gravelly, male, mechanical voice. A menu appeared on the screen, and the computer recited each listing.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the election nears, it keeps track of donors and volunteers, spits out Federal Election Commission reports and thank-you letters, targets key precincts and analyzes poll results. In short, "Campaign Manager," a popular political software package that costs $750, can perform many of the functions of its human counterpart - with the help of a personal computer and a computer-wise operator. "The computer is the equivalent of 30,000 volunteers sorting file cards," said John Phillips, president of Aristotle Industries Inc., the program's manufacturer.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | BY HARRY T. JOHNSON III
I'm a strong supporter of our Technological Age, taking delight in all the new toys these advances have brought us. Computers, cable TV, satellite dishes and the like are all wonderful things. You know what they say: He who dies with the most toys wins. Well, I'm gonna win! But some of these advances have, in certain situations, taken the place of common sense. Let me relate a recent experience. I have fallen behind on my mortgage on occasion - not enough to be in danger of foreclosure, but enough to really tick off the mortgage company.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1988 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Step-Saver Data Systems Inc., a Bala Cynwyd computer company, said yesterday that it had filed for reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The seven-year-old company, which provides computer systems for medical and law offices both directly and through franchisees, reported losses in 1987 and 1988. The company said it intended to present a reorganization plan "that will place it in a better position to compete effectively in the rapidly changing computer markets.
NEWS
November 29, 2004 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Eric's passion is computers, and he can spend many hours happily absorbed in computer games. He also likes doing his schoolwork on the computer. This 9-year-old's second-favorite activity is playing outdoors, especially riding his bike. When he is inside, he enjoys watching cartoons and playing with his toys. Often sweet and caring, Eric is working on controlling his frustration level. He is doing very well in the third grade in a school where he receives special services.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1993 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"Sometimes I get an appetite for something downright apocalyptic," says a character in The Big Numbers, and by the time the remark is made those watching Craig Wright's play suspect that this yearning may indeed be satisfied. Already there have been ominous indications that something is not right in the world outside the deep basement computer room where Wright's odd, fascinating, crazy dark comedy is set. One of the two computer operators who are the play's main characters has been finding very large figures on his computer screen and, although we don't learn until three-quarters of the way through the play just exactly what he is counting, it's obvious that these big numbers bode ill for the future of humankind.
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NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Tia Yang, Staff Writer
John J. O'Neill, 89, of Blue Bell, a lead computer programmer on the Gemini space program in the 1960s, died of complications of cancer Monday, April 11, at Normandy Farms Estates. Mr. O'Neill was born in Philadelphia and raised in Easton, Pa. After high school, he served as a corpsman in the Navy on the Tranquillity during World War II. The Tranquillity saw action in the Pacific transporting wounded personnel. After his service, Mr. O'Neill attended Temple University, where he met his wife, Claire.
NEWS
February 29, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Edward J. Kaminski was a dinner-plate fisherman, comfortable seeking out blues and flounders for his kitchen from his 18-foot motorboat. Closer to land than to the ocean deep. But in the 1990s, he and a few older men ventured forth, joining a younger sailboat crew. "The young guys sailed to Bermuda, and raced in a regatta there," but they had to fly back to their jobs, his wife, Helen, said. "So it was the old guys who brought the boats back," with all the heavy lifting that the effort demanded.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2016 | By Erin Arvedlund, Staff Writer
In choosing a money manager, one key issue comes down to this: Would you rather have a human or a computer run your money? Last year, many investors voted for the computer, pulling money from "active" money managers who tried to pick individual stocks but failed to beat the market. Instead, investors piled money into "passive" funds that follow a benchmark, such as the S&P 500 index. Or they used "robo-advisers" - strict computer investing models or exchange-traded funds that track a specific group of shares.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Jerry Augustus, 83, a retired restaurateur and later a computer programmer for the Philadelphia Water Department, died Sunday, Jan. 31, of complications from a stroke at Philadelphia Nursing Home. A lifelong city resident, Mr. Augustus was the son of Dennis and Lela Dialismas Augustus. He attended Drexel University. As a teenager, he was a member of the choir of St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral. Active in many Greek life organizations, he was the national president of the Greek Orthodox Youth of America.
NEWS
December 8, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Slipping inside a red wooden booth containing a computer tablet mounted on a wall, Rutgers-Camden students typed in their names, interests, or whatever word popped into their heads. The Typomatic returned a list of words, some with no apparent connection and others political, poignant, or just funny: STARWARS transformed to STORYLESS , FREEDOM to THUGGERY , LEBRON to LEGEND . The pairs match visually when cut in half horizontally, according to a typeface designed by an artist behind the Typomatic machine.
NEWS
November 20, 2015
MOST Philadelphians are either down on the city, or skeptical of its chances for future success. That's my reading of a novel city survey assessing attitudes rather than demographics, from the always engaging Pew Charitable Trusts. Rather than lump Philadelphians into the familiar categories of age, income, race, gender, religion or political party, it harnessed computer power to create four attitudinal groups: Dissatisfied Citizens, Die-hard Loyalists, Uncommitted Skeptics, Enthusiastic Urbanists.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2015 | Chuck Darrow, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
Mitch Albom has spent the past three-plus decades as an award-winning newspaper columnist, best-selling author and popular radio talk-show host in his adopted hometown of Detroit. But, he admitted during a recent phone call, he'd have given up all this fame and fortune he has accrued if he could have made his living as a musician. When asked to elaborate, Albom, 57, whose latest novel, The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto , is a mix of history and fiction about a celebrated guitar player, didn't hesitate to set the record straight about where his priorities lie. "I would probably go back and do it if they just promised me a steady paycheck," said the Passaic, N.J.-born multimedia giant who grew up in Haddon Township, Camden County.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
An FBI data expert told a Philadelphia jury Wednesday that he found a prodigious number of deleted file fragments on accused stalker John Hart's computers, including two Internet programs that enable a user to disguise the computer's identity. Michael Irvin testified that the websites - "Spoof Your IP Address" and "Spoofing Demystified" - offer software that would have let Hart cloak his computer during Internet searches for private information about CBS3 newscaster Erika von Tiehl. Spoofing is the term for making a computer's unique Internet Protocol (IP)
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | By Clem Murray, INQUIRER STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Inquirer staff photographer Clem Murray, on vacation at a Mexican resort, suddenly found himself and a companion in the path of Hurricane Patricia. Without time to evacuate, they hoped for the best. We left our room a little after 2 p.m. Friday and were escorted about 100 yards to the back of our resort, the Grand Mayan in Nuevo Vallarta, to an immense concrete building that looked like a parking garage, rising five levels. The building indeed housed cars but was also home to numerous departments of the Vidanta Resorts, including the executive offices, accounting, telemarketing and one level for the maintenance department.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Joshua delights in solving computer problems, and he excels at it. Those who know the 11-year-old say he is an IT expert. When not on the computer, Joshua can frequently be found surfing the Web on his iPad. He also enjoys swimming and taking drum lessons. Joshua does well in school, where he benefits from a small class size and individual attention. He is passionate about anything relating to science. He especially loves learning about dinosaurs and sea creatures. Last semester, he earned three school achievement awards, which mean a lot to him. He plans to work hard to receive more awards.
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