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NEWS
February 28, 1991 | By Michele McCreary, Special to The Inquirer
New computer programs dealing with Homer's Odyssey and Shakespeare's Hamlet soon will be added to the resources of the New Hope-Solebury School District. The programs are included in a $45,000 package of computer-related spending approved Monday by the school board. The district will acquire eight new IBM computer terminals for the math- science lab at the high school and one Macintosh computer for the elementary school. It is buying software dealing with, among other subjects, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Christopher Columbus and Shakespeare's plays.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Sony Corp. yesterday unveiled a book-sized portable computer with no keyboard that can read letters handwritten on its screen in English or Japanese. Sony described the PalmTop PTC-500 as a significant breakthrough that could make personal computers as common as Walkman portable stereos. "This machine has historical significance," said Toshi Doi, director of Sony's microcomputer group. "The product is targeted for a far wider range of potential users in the coming era of a computer for everyone.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
You say Cmdr. Data, that walking, talking, thinking android with a neuron computer for a brain on Star Trek: The Next Generation is only fiction? Well, OK, he is . . . for now. But watch out. There is a neuron computer at the University of Pennsylvania that does a lot of dazzling Data-like - make that, human-like - tricks. It can recognize images and sounds and generalize about them, just as you do when you recognize a friend's face - or voice - and say hello. Sure, you can run into somebody who looks or sounds so much like your friend, you're mistaken.
NEWS
December 28, 1986 | By Janet Ruth Falon, Special to The Inquirer
Once, while among a group of knowledgeable personal-computer types who were observing a demonstration of some new software, I innocently asked, "What's the difference between a data base and a spreadsheet?" And while my naive query and obvious computer illiteracy drew some snooty raised eyebrows, a kindly college kid (wearing a T-shirt with a drawing of a vampire saying "I want a byte") took me aside and explained, in simple English, the answer to my very basic question. I wish to report that I have since become savvy.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
Edward Godfrey, 32, sat before his Gold Star PC in the Gloucester County College computer laboratory in Deptford and struck a command key. The computer gurgled. In quick succession, Godfrey typed a series of strokes: A/ ENTER. A/1 - ACCOUNTING PROGRAM, the computer wrote on the screen. And then it spoke to Godfrey. "You have entered accounting program A slash 1," it said in a gravelly, male, mechanical voice. A menu appeared on the screen, and the computer recited each listing.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the election nears, it keeps track of donors and volunteers, spits out Federal Election Commission reports and thank-you letters, targets key precincts and analyzes poll results. In short, "Campaign Manager," a popular political software package that costs $750, can perform many of the functions of its human counterpart - with the help of a personal computer and a computer-wise operator. "The computer is the equivalent of 30,000 volunteers sorting file cards," said John Phillips, president of Aristotle Industries Inc., the program's manufacturer.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | BY HARRY T. JOHNSON III
I'm a strong supporter of our Technological Age, taking delight in all the new toys these advances have brought us. Computers, cable TV, satellite dishes and the like are all wonderful things. You know what they say: He who dies with the most toys wins. Well, I'm gonna win! But some of these advances have, in certain situations, taken the place of common sense. Let me relate a recent experience. I have fallen behind on my mortgage on occasion - not enough to be in danger of foreclosure, but enough to really tick off the mortgage company.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1988 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Step-Saver Data Systems Inc., a Bala Cynwyd computer company, said yesterday that it had filed for reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The seven-year-old company, which provides computer systems for medical and law offices both directly and through franchisees, reported losses in 1987 and 1988. The company said it intended to present a reorganization plan "that will place it in a better position to compete effectively in the rapidly changing computer markets.
NEWS
November 29, 2004 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Eric's passion is computers, and he can spend many hours happily absorbed in computer games. He also likes doing his schoolwork on the computer. This 9-year-old's second-favorite activity is playing outdoors, especially riding his bike. When he is inside, he enjoys watching cartoons and playing with his toys. Often sweet and caring, Eric is working on controlling his frustration level. He is doing very well in the third grade in a school where he receives special services.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1993 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"Sometimes I get an appetite for something downright apocalyptic," says a character in The Big Numbers, and by the time the remark is made those watching Craig Wright's play suspect that this yearning may indeed be satisfied. Already there have been ominous indications that something is not right in the world outside the deep basement computer room where Wright's odd, fascinating, crazy dark comedy is set. One of the two computer operators who are the play's main characters has been finding very large figures on his computer screen and, although we don't learn until three-quarters of the way through the play just exactly what he is counting, it's obvious that these big numbers bode ill for the future of humankind.
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NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The concentrated heat radiating from your laptop. The sudden roar of the cooling fan from inside your desktop computer. Familiar signs of wasted energy, caused largely by the increasing numbers of transistors crammed into the innards of our electronic gadgets. As you reach once again for that charging cable, be aware that an amiable pair of University of Pennsylvania physicists may have hit on the beginnings of a solution: a new kind of material called topological insulators.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
I admit, I was quite horrified - like, shaken to my very core - by Unfriended , a horror pic with a new gimmick that likely will spawn an entire subgenre of more substandard rubbish. Unfriended unfolds entirely on a computer screen, the story and dialogue taking place among characters engaged in multiple acts of multiple-partner Skyping, Facebooking, and Googling. Possibly the single most uncinematic device ever used in a film, the gimmick must have made the studio suits jump with joy. Talk about low overhead!
BUSINESS
April 3, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
It can happen to anyone, including the tech-savvy. You click on a seemingly harmless link, or don't even know what went wrong. Suddenly, you lose access to your own computer, and all your crucial files - or, even worse, files shared by a business. How much would you pay to regain control? Market testing by the bad guys - yes, the tools of capitalism thrive in the Net's back alleys, just as in Silicon Valley - seems to suggest that consumers will pay from $500 to $700 for an outright ransom demand, and that businesses might fork over thousands.
REAL_ESTATE
March 22, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Harry and Susan Armstrong flip houses. To date, the Pitman couple have flipped 15 - eight in recent years, after their children were grown. All but one of those flips has been in Pitman. "You do what you know," said Harry, publisher of the Golden Times, which he describes as a regional newspaper for seniors. But this is not about house-flipping, which Harry said he and Susan do as padding for retirement. "We're not professionals," he emphasizes. That isn't to say I'm not going to squeeze in a few of his observations about flipping at some point, since I'm again getting inquiries from wannabes.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
When George Zhu attended Mercersburg Academy, a boarding school in central Pennsylvania, he was always told to finish his plate at dinner. The law required cafeteria workers to dump whatever prepared food was not consumed or never served. That wastefulness bothered Zhu, now a sophomore at Swarthmore College. So he spent an almost sleepless weekend in a building at Haverford College with his team of three friends - surrounded by pizza boxes and dozens of other ambitious students - searching for a solution through technology.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Since New Jersey expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, its efforts to enroll thousands of low-income residents have been hampered by low staffing and antiquated technology. Gov. Christie championed the expansion, and, indeed, 300,000 New Jersey adults have enrolled in Medicaid, the federal program for the poor and disabled, since President Obama's health-care law took effect in October 2013. Many gained coverage directly through online state and federal portals. Yet an estimated 11,000 others, whom experts describe as some of the state's most vulnerable citizens, have received no response to their applications.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
"We want a cool office," said Gabriel Weinberg , founder of six-year-old DuckDuckGo , the Google-challenging search site that promises "Real Privacy - Smarter Search - Less Clutter. " The Massachusetts Institute of Technology grad's style sense prompted DuckDuckGo, which keeps 25 software developers and designers busy powering 200 million monthly user searches, to build its headquarters on the top two floors of a stone-fronted, turret-topped, asymmetrical office building on Paoli Pike two blocks from the Paoli Amtrak station and a short drive from Weinberg's home on Valley Forge Mountain.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
'He was an amazing human being who is finally, rightfully, getting recognition for the great advances he made," Benedict Cumberbatch says about Alan Turing, the British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and computer pioneer who led the team of code-breakers responsible for cracking Nazi Germany's daunting Enigma machine. Cumberbatch, of course, is playing no small part in seeing to it that Turing gets his due: In The Imitation Game , opening Christmas Day at area theaters, the actor is Turing - a deeply complicated figure whose breakthroughs at Bletchley Park, the top-secret intelligence enclave set up in 1939 in Buckinghamshire, are credited with bringing World War II to a speedier end, thus saving hundreds of thousands of lives.
NEWS
October 1, 2014
SOMETHING WAS wrong with my computer, the caller told me. He said his systems had detected a virus. (My computer had been rather slow lately.) He said he was a computer technician with Microsoft. "How did you get my number?" I asked. "You registered on the site," he said. It was possible. Before he could help me, the man said he needed remote access to my computer. He immediately began to give me instructions on how to allow him to take over my machine. At that point, my skepticism kicked in. "You know, this sounds awfully like a scam," I said.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flower-arranging class at Barclay Friends, a West Chester nursing home with expansive gardens, was winding down when horticulturist Cheryl Bjornson pulled out her newest tool: a computer system called Linked Senior. It's loaded with activities meant to appeal to audiences like Bjornson's - 13 quiet, aged ladies with small vases of zinnias before them and one sleeping man. To liven things up, Bjornson displayed a garden trivia game on a giant screen. A woman who used to work at Waterloo Gardens correctly chose the number of flower species (between 250,000 and 500,000)
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