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NEWS
February 28, 1991 | By Michele McCreary, Special to The Inquirer
New computer programs dealing with Homer's Odyssey and Shakespeare's Hamlet soon will be added to the resources of the New Hope-Solebury School District. The programs are included in a $45,000 package of computer-related spending approved Monday by the school board. The district will acquire eight new IBM computer terminals for the math- science lab at the high school and one Macintosh computer for the elementary school. It is buying software dealing with, among other subjects, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Christopher Columbus and Shakespeare's plays.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Sony Corp. yesterday unveiled a book-sized portable computer with no keyboard that can read letters handwritten on its screen in English or Japanese. Sony described the PalmTop PTC-500 as a significant breakthrough that could make personal computers as common as Walkman portable stereos. "This machine has historical significance," said Toshi Doi, director of Sony's microcomputer group. "The product is targeted for a far wider range of potential users in the coming era of a computer for everyone.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
You say Cmdr. Data, that walking, talking, thinking android with a neuron computer for a brain on Star Trek: The Next Generation is only fiction? Well, OK, he is . . . for now. But watch out. There is a neuron computer at the University of Pennsylvania that does a lot of dazzling Data-like - make that, human-like - tricks. It can recognize images and sounds and generalize about them, just as you do when you recognize a friend's face - or voice - and say hello. Sure, you can run into somebody who looks or sounds so much like your friend, you're mistaken.
NEWS
December 28, 1986 | By Janet Ruth Falon, Special to The Inquirer
Once, while among a group of knowledgeable personal-computer types who were observing a demonstration of some new software, I innocently asked, "What's the difference between a data base and a spreadsheet?" And while my naive query and obvious computer illiteracy drew some snooty raised eyebrows, a kindly college kid (wearing a T-shirt with a drawing of a vampire saying "I want a byte") took me aside and explained, in simple English, the answer to my very basic question. I wish to report that I have since become savvy.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
Edward Godfrey, 32, sat before his Gold Star PC in the Gloucester County College computer laboratory in Deptford and struck a command key. The computer gurgled. In quick succession, Godfrey typed a series of strokes: A/ ENTER. A/1 - ACCOUNTING PROGRAM, the computer wrote on the screen. And then it spoke to Godfrey. "You have entered accounting program A slash 1," it said in a gravelly, male, mechanical voice. A menu appeared on the screen, and the computer recited each listing.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the election nears, it keeps track of donors and volunteers, spits out Federal Election Commission reports and thank-you letters, targets key precincts and analyzes poll results. In short, "Campaign Manager," a popular political software package that costs $750, can perform many of the functions of its human counterpart - with the help of a personal computer and a computer-wise operator. "The computer is the equivalent of 30,000 volunteers sorting file cards," said John Phillips, president of Aristotle Industries Inc., the program's manufacturer.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | BY HARRY T. JOHNSON III
I'm a strong supporter of our Technological Age, taking delight in all the new toys these advances have brought us. Computers, cable TV, satellite dishes and the like are all wonderful things. You know what they say: He who dies with the most toys wins. Well, I'm gonna win! But some of these advances have, in certain situations, taken the place of common sense. Let me relate a recent experience. I have fallen behind on my mortgage on occasion - not enough to be in danger of foreclosure, but enough to really tick off the mortgage company.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1988 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Step-Saver Data Systems Inc., a Bala Cynwyd computer company, said yesterday that it had filed for reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The seven-year-old company, which provides computer systems for medical and law offices both directly and through franchisees, reported losses in 1987 and 1988. The company said it intended to present a reorganization plan "that will place it in a better position to compete effectively in the rapidly changing computer markets.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | by Tom Schmidt and Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writers
Alfonso Cruz had made a new life for himself, as a family man and auto mechanic, in Paterson, N.J. He was working at his job at a Goodyear Service Center there yesterday when FBI agents arrested him as a fugitive in the slaying 20 years ago of a South Philadelphia woman, Mary Dupoldt. Philadelphia police said Cruz fell victim to the computer age. A police spokesman said investigators, who had a couple of boxes filled with information on Cruz, scanned the name of the fugitive through a new software package called Fast Track, and found that he worked at the service center.
NEWS
November 29, 2004 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Eric's passion is computers, and he can spend many hours happily absorbed in computer games. He also likes doing his schoolwork on the computer. This 9-year-old's second-favorite activity is playing outdoors, especially riding his bike. When he is inside, he enjoys watching cartoons and playing with his toys. Often sweet and caring, Eric is working on controlling his frustration level. He is doing very well in the third grade in a school where he receives special services.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 14, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Jonathan A. Minder, 74, of Southampton, a former computer systems manager, died of respiratory failure on Sept. 7, at Virtua Voorhees Hospital. Until earlier this year, he had been a member since 2009 of the board of trustees at the Southampton retirement community Leisuretowne and president of that board since 2014. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Minder graduated from Gloucester Catholic High School in 1959. From 1961 to 1981, he was an Air Force radar and computer worker. He was discharged as a master sergeant.
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
If police think someone has child pornography on his computer, should investigators be able to force him to provide his passwords - or would that violate his constitutional right against self-incrimination? That issue was at the heart of an appellate hearing Wednesday in federal court in Philadelphia in the case of Francis Rawls, a former Philadelphia police sergeant, who has not been charged with a crime but who has been in custody for nearly a year in contempt of court for failing to unlock his encrypted electronic devices.
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, STAFF WRITER
In the year she turned 39, after helping raise her children, Edith Vernick Bergmann went to an employment agency to help determine her future. "She liked math," a son, Warren, said, so, after she took a test, the person in charge suggested a job in computer programming. "This test was like playing a fun game," Warren said. After she had completed it, she told the tester that "she wanted to do more. " He demurred. "When she came home," her son recalled, "she said, 'I don't know what a computer programmer is, but that's what I want to be.' " On Thursday, Aug. 25, Mrs. Bergmann, 91, a former insurance firm computer analyst, died at the Terraces at Parke Place, an assisted living community in Sewell, where she had lived since 2014.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Joshua delights in solving computer problems, and he excels at it. Those who know him say he is an IT expert. When not on the computer, Joshua can frequently be found surfing the web on his iPad. In addition to his technological endeavors, he enjoys swimming, dancing, watching cartoons on television, and playing Frisbee. The 12-year-old is passionate about anything to do with creatures. His vision of a perfect day would include visiting the Camden Aquarium and seeing and maybe petting some of the sea creatures.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
THE PENNSYLVANIA Department of Revenue says it is contacting hundreds of taxpayers whose personal information was on a laptop that was stolen last month. The computer was stolen in late June when department auditors were in San Francisco to conduct a routine audit. Someone smashed the windows of the auditors' rental vehicle and took four laptops, which have not been recovered, the department said. The data on one of the computers may not have been secure, the department said, meaning personal information from some taxpayers may have been compromised.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Mari A. Schaefer, and Emily Babay, STAFF WRITERS
Broadcast over police radio Friday morning, the call for help was harrowing. "I'm shot in the face! I'm shot in the face!" Folcroft Police Officer Christopher Dorman shouted as gunfire boomed in the background. "I'm shot! I'm shot! I'm shot!" Yet miles away in Delaware County's 911 center, no dispatcher heard him. For four minutes on Friday morning, a computer responsible for handling all emergency calls for the Folcroft area crashed, leaving Dorman and responding officers without an essential lifeline.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Joseph Jaafari, STAFF WRITER
A new college ranking has declared the University of Pennsylvania one of the top places in the United States to study computer science. The rankings by College Choice put Penn at No. 15 out of 50 schools nationwide for undergraduate degrees in computer science. Penn scored 88.35 on a scale of 0 to 100. The report lauded the university's Center for Human Modeling and Simulation - which animates human movement for medical research - as a top selling point, and said that students who graduate from Penn's program typically get entry-level jobs starting at $60,000.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Drexel University on Thursday named a new dean for its College of Computing and Informatics. Yi Deng, 56, who has led the College of Computing and Informatics at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte for six years, will join Drexel in September. He replaces David Fenske, who retired. At UNC Charlotte, Deng is credited with contributing to dramatic growth in both enrollment and research funding. Drexel provost M. Brian Blake said in a statement that welcoming Deng to campus ensured that "a college, already on a rising trajectory, continues on its path of success with a shared vision to address the nation's fastest-growing job sector.
NEWS
June 14, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
A longtime Villanova professor accused of accessing child pornography on a campus computer in March had someone looking over his shoulder: a security firm that the university had hired to monitor its computer network. Within 20 minutes, BTB Security identified the building and floor where the computer was located and alerted Villanova, kicking off an investigation that led to the arrest of Christopher Haas, a tenured associate professor of history and classical studies. The discovery was one of many security breaches that BTB, a cybersecurity and digital-forensics company, says it uncovers for clients every year.
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