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NEWS
February 28, 1991 | By Michele McCreary, Special to The Inquirer
New computer programs dealing with Homer's Odyssey and Shakespeare's Hamlet soon will be added to the resources of the New Hope-Solebury School District. The programs are included in a $45,000 package of computer-related spending approved Monday by the school board. The district will acquire eight new IBM computer terminals for the math- science lab at the high school and one Macintosh computer for the elementary school. It is buying software dealing with, among other subjects, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Christopher Columbus and Shakespeare's plays.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Sony Corp. yesterday unveiled a book-sized portable computer with no keyboard that can read letters handwritten on its screen in English or Japanese. Sony described the PalmTop PTC-500 as a significant breakthrough that could make personal computers as common as Walkman portable stereos. "This machine has historical significance," said Toshi Doi, director of Sony's microcomputer group. "The product is targeted for a far wider range of potential users in the coming era of a computer for everyone.
BUSINESS
February 4, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
You say Cmdr. Data, that walking, talking, thinking android with a neuron computer for a brain on Star Trek: The Next Generation is only fiction? Well, OK, he is . . . for now. But watch out. There is a neuron computer at the University of Pennsylvania that does a lot of dazzling Data-like - make that, human-like - tricks. It can recognize images and sounds and generalize about them, just as you do when you recognize a friend's face - or voice - and say hello. Sure, you can run into somebody who looks or sounds so much like your friend, you're mistaken.
NEWS
December 28, 1986 | By Janet Ruth Falon, Special to The Inquirer
Once, while among a group of knowledgeable personal-computer types who were observing a demonstration of some new software, I innocently asked, "What's the difference between a data base and a spreadsheet?" And while my naive query and obvious computer illiteracy drew some snooty raised eyebrows, a kindly college kid (wearing a T-shirt with a drawing of a vampire saying "I want a byte") took me aside and explained, in simple English, the answer to my very basic question. I wish to report that I have since become savvy.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
Edward Godfrey, 32, sat before his Gold Star PC in the Gloucester County College computer laboratory in Deptford and struck a command key. The computer gurgled. In quick succession, Godfrey typed a series of strokes: A/ ENTER. A/1 - ACCOUNTING PROGRAM, the computer wrote on the screen. And then it spoke to Godfrey. "You have entered accounting program A slash 1," it said in a gravelly, male, mechanical voice. A menu appeared on the screen, and the computer recited each listing.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the election nears, it keeps track of donors and volunteers, spits out Federal Election Commission reports and thank-you letters, targets key precincts and analyzes poll results. In short, "Campaign Manager," a popular political software package that costs $750, can perform many of the functions of its human counterpart - with the help of a personal computer and a computer-wise operator. "The computer is the equivalent of 30,000 volunteers sorting file cards," said John Phillips, president of Aristotle Industries Inc., the program's manufacturer.
NEWS
July 11, 1994 | BY HARRY T. JOHNSON III
I'm a strong supporter of our Technological Age, taking delight in all the new toys these advances have brought us. Computers, cable TV, satellite dishes and the like are all wonderful things. You know what they say: He who dies with the most toys wins. Well, I'm gonna win! But some of these advances have, in certain situations, taken the place of common sense. Let me relate a recent experience. I have fallen behind on my mortgage on occasion - not enough to be in danger of foreclosure, but enough to really tick off the mortgage company.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1988 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Step-Saver Data Systems Inc., a Bala Cynwyd computer company, said yesterday that it had filed for reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The seven-year-old company, which provides computer systems for medical and law offices both directly and through franchisees, reported losses in 1987 and 1988. The company said it intended to present a reorganization plan "that will place it in a better position to compete effectively in the rapidly changing computer markets.
NEWS
November 29, 2004 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Eric's passion is computers, and he can spend many hours happily absorbed in computer games. He also likes doing his schoolwork on the computer. This 9-year-old's second-favorite activity is playing outdoors, especially riding his bike. When he is inside, he enjoys watching cartoons and playing with his toys. Often sweet and caring, Eric is working on controlling his frustration level. He is doing very well in the third grade in a school where he receives special services.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1993 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"Sometimes I get an appetite for something downright apocalyptic," says a character in The Big Numbers, and by the time the remark is made those watching Craig Wright's play suspect that this yearning may indeed be satisfied. Already there have been ominous indications that something is not right in the world outside the deep basement computer room where Wright's odd, fascinating, crazy dark comedy is set. One of the two computer operators who are the play's main characters has been finding very large figures on his computer screen and, although we don't learn until three-quarters of the way through the play just exactly what he is counting, it's obvious that these big numbers bode ill for the future of humankind.
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BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Say you're sitting in a coffee shop, and pull out your laptop or tablet to check your Web mail or bank balance. Fleetingly, you may wonder just how secure these things are. But then you're reassured by a Web address that begins with "https" and displays a comforting icon: a padlock. We learned last week that we were a little too comforted by those symbols of security - each signs that a website uses a protocol known as SSL, in which the first S stands for secure . For two years - ever since a German engineer updated a section of code on New Year's Eve 2011 - a widely used version, OpenSSL, has been anything but secure, thanks to a bug nicknamed Heartbleed.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
WALL TOWNSHIP Most people might see computers from the '60s, '70s, and '80s as useless relics from another time, dust collectors to be tossed out with scraps from the dinner table. But Evan Koblentz and about 300 others from across the world attending the annual Vintage Computer Festival East see the collection of plastic, glass, and circuitry as art and history. They revel in obsolete technology and will be in nerd nirvana during computer demonstrations to be held Saturday and Sunday at the InfoAge Science Center on the 2200 block of Marconi Road.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Adler, 60, of Cherry Hill, a devoted husband and father with a love for computers, died at his home Sunday, March 16, after a five-month battle with lung cancer. "He fought a graceful, dignified battle against lung cancer," his wife, Betty, said Monday. "He had excruciating pain the last five months. " Betty Adler, a health lawyer for the University of Pennsylvania/Penn Medicine and president of the Jewish Federation of Southern New Jersey, said she and her husband knew each other from childhood.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A blur of motion on the ice, Haley Beavers spun into the air to attempt a triple loop - one of the standard jumps in the repertoire of an elite skater. She did not quite make it, stumbling on her landing at the University of Delaware. No matter. Within minutes, a sleek computer simulation showed the 14-year-old that if she drew her arms in just a bit closer, she would be golden. Call it better skating through physics. Four of the five U.S. Olympic singles skaters competing this month in Russia have used the simulation software, in a joint project between researchers at Delaware and a Maryland company called C-Motion Inc. The next generation of Olympic hopefuls, such as Beavers, has lined up as well, using it to practice more efficiently and, ideally, cut down on the number of bone-jarring falls and injuries.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jennifer Kay bends down to push the orange button on the controller of her small, gray Lego robot. It comes to life, executing a series of short commands Kay had linked together in just a few seconds by dragging blocks around on her computer screen: Say, "Good morning. " Roll forward for one second. Stop. Kay, a computer science professor at Rowan University, looks up, pleased. Seeing the robot move according to its instructions is so satisfying, she said, that it's a natural tool for making computer science education exciting.
NEWS
January 2, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
June Luther Cardosi, 83, of West Chester, one of the earliest woman computer programmers at Cape Canaveral in the early 1960s, died Friday, Dec. 27, of heart failure at a hospice. Mrs. Cardosi programmed flight trajectories and was a system analyst in the defense industry at Cape Canaveral and in San Diego. She served on the West Chester Area School District board on and off for 12 years, and was a founding member of the short-lived West Chester Area Tax $avers Association, which sought to save money in the district.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
KEVIN HART is mad as hell, and he's not afraid to let the world know. "Don't let the this [sic] bulls--- affect your mental, kids," the Philly-born comedian wrote yesterday in a Twitter post directed at the city's youth. "I love y'all and I will be back shortly. " Hart has to come back because a selfish thief capitalized on his charity. Last month, Hart donated 500 Sony Vaio computers to the city - 200 of which were given to the Parks and Recreation Department, which distributed them to 25 facilities in low-income areas.
REAL_ESTATE
December 8, 2013 | By Alison Burdo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Each month, many a Philadelphian digs through a loose assortment of stubby pencils and uncapped pens, crinkled take-out menus, orange-handled scissors, old batteries, and half-used rolls of tape hunting for a checkbook - untouched since its last use 30 days ago - to pay the rent. But to stay competitive in the digital era, industry observers say, landlords ought to offer an amenity that changes the monthly ritual from searching the junk drawer to surfing the Net: Online bill-paying.
NEWS
November 30, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fernando Pereira was recently trying to organize a session at a forthcoming computer science conference about the work of Ben Taskar, a former University of Pennsylvania associate professor who died of an apparent heart attack Nov. 17. There was just one problem. Though he was only 36, Mr. Taskar enjoyed a career so full of highlights it was almost impossible to choose from among them, said Pereira, a former Penn faculty member who is now a research director at Google. "He is one of maybe the most creative people in the field in his generation," Pereira said.
NEWS
November 27, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former business manager of Dorothy June Brown's charter school network admitted in federal court Monday that he was lying to federal investigators when he told them the school boards had approved emergency loans to each other. In fact, Anthony Smoot said, he lied over the course of seven interviews with federal agents. But Smoot said he was telling the truth on the stand - he had to, he said, under his plea agreement with prosecutors. He has already pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice in the $6.7 million charter fraud case and prosecutors have told him he could be charged with lying to federal agents if he does not say what really happened.
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