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Computer Security

NEWS
March 24, 2010 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A U.S. Senate subcommittee hearing on surveillance-law issues related to the Lower Merion School District's laptop-spying allegations will be conducted in Philadelphia's federal courthouse Monday. But no one involved in the Web-cam fracas is expected to appear. A witness list for the hearing indicates that U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter (D., Pa.), who chairs the crime and drugs subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Committee, plans to call five national technology and law experts unaffiliated with Lower Merion schools or the family of Blake Robbins.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A Cornell University graduate student was indicted yesterday on a felony charge stemming from the creation of a computer "virus" that paralyzed about 6,000 military and university computers last fall. Robert T. Morris Jr. was indicted by a federal grand jury in Syracuse, N.Y., on a charge of obtaining unauthorized access to Pentagon-linked computer systems across the nation. The computer virus prevented the authorized use of those computers by universities and military bases.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2005 | By Tony Pugh INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Federal agents are in a familiar position as they probe the computer-security breach at an Arizona firm that left credit-card data for about 40 million people open to theft: Once again, they're playing catch-up. Faced with the vastness of cyberspace, the technical prowess of the thieves, and the runaway pace of technology, finding the culprits is no simple matter. "Unfortunately, the nature of cyber crime, and identity theft, is such that law enforcement will probably always be involved in a game of catch-up," said Paul Luehr, Minneapolis-based vice president for Stroz Friedberg L.L.C.
NEWS
March 13, 1996 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
A lot of people embellish their resumes when it comes to applying for a new job. Then there's John D. Catone, a former aide in the Casey administration. According to the state Ethics Commission, he took bragging to new - and illegal - heights. The commission has accused the former deputy special assistant to ex-Gov. Bob Casey of three counts of violating the state Ethics Act for touting his "access and influence" as a Casey administration official. The commission said that Catone tried to get a monthly salary from a private firm in return for using his government position to obtain contracts for the firm and that he used state equipment for personal use and performed work for the firm on state time.
NEWS
May 1, 2012 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you use the Web, you have probably encountered an annoying invention called a CAPTCHA. They're the squished-up, stretched and squiggled, color-blotched collections of letters you often have to decipher before you can send an e-mail, post a comment, or buy a ticket. Is that an i or an l? you wonder. A zero or an O? Maybe you see three letters where it seems there should only be two. You tilt your head. You scoot your chair back and squint. You wonder if you need new glasses.
LIVING
August 17, 1995 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul Taylor, a 25-year-old self-taught computer whiz on probation for hacking, talks about the Hacker Ethic in the same way old men reminisce about a bygone era. "The hacker ethic was born in the early '80s," said Taylor, of Ridley. It meant that the "main reason to hack is to learn," and "when you get into a (computer or telephone) system, don't mess anything up - look around and leave, without getting caught. " Taylor says he's followed that ethic (except for the part about getting caught rerouting telephone calls)
BUSINESS
July 12, 2005 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Calling spyware "a global scourge that's reached epidemic proportions," a coalition of technology companies and public-interest groups is expected today to announce a set of guidelines and definitions that it hopes will aid everyone from makers of anti-spyware programs to consumers with infected computers. The Anti-Spyware Coalition's new guidelines arrive amid growing recognition of spyware, and as companies that market ad-delivery software known as adware are trying aggressively to distance themselves from the "spyware" label.
NEWS
September 23, 2000
We're a bit ambivalent about the case of the New Jersey teen-ager whom the Securities and Exchange Commission characterized as a stock manipulator. This isn't because the charge isn't true. The 15-year-old did buy inexpensive stocks and then hype them relentlessly using many imaginary names on a variety of online bulletin boards and chat rooms. Because the stocks were so thinly traded, his recommendations moved the stocks, and he quickly sold them when their prices rose. He made almost $300,000, which, under the agreement reached with the SEC, he is returning with interest.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | By Curt Suplee and Evelyn Richards, Inquirer Washington Bureau
America's increasingly computerized society will become dangerously vulnerable to attacks by criminals and high-tech terrorists unless new nationwide computer security precautions are taken soon, a National Research Council committee announced yesterday. "So far, the nation has been remarkably lucky in escaping any successful attempts to subvert critical computing systems," said the committee's chairman, David D. Clark, a computer scientist from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | Daily News wire services
WASHINGTON U.S. SUGGESTING DRINKING TESTS The government proposed yesterday to administer random breath tests for alcohol among nearly 7 million trucking, airline, rail and bus workers. It estimated testing would save 1,200 lives in a decade by deterring drinking. All drivers of commercial vehicles, airline flight crews and mechanics and other transportation workers whose jobs can affect safety would stand a 1-in-5 to 1-in-2 chance of being tested at least once a year.
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