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Computer Specialists

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NEWS
December 1, 1996 | By Daniel S. Greenberg
Of the many forecasts for the next century, a safe one is that privacy will be a goner. The computer is already leading to that in medical recordkeeping, personal buying patterns and even in tracking our physical whereabouts. And we're only in the beginning stages of keeping tabs on everything about everyone. Every now and then, there's an outrageous assault on privacy, such as the recent surfacing of thousands of AIDS patients' names from a supposedly secure filing system.
NEWS
April 7, 1999
Two of the most urgent needs in fighting crime in Philadelphia are accurate statistics and more police protection on the streets. Commissioner John Timoney is learning the hard way what his predecessors had to put up with - the system is more resistant to change than it is dedicated to fighting crime. He has been using computer specialists, trained at the University of Pennsylvania, to develop the sophisticated maps that guide police deployment and tactics. But the Fraternal Order of Police complained to the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board that this takes work away from cops.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1987 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
Joe Mohen used to feel wanted. Now he says he feels like a leper. Mohen is one of one million high-technology specialists whose livelihood is threatened by the new tax law passed last fall, according to the Technology Consultants National Association. The trade group held a meeting last night at the Dunfey City Line Hotel to discuss ways to change the new law. The law eliminates the independent contractor status that has been used by computer specialists, engineers, systems analysts, designers and drafters, all of whom work for themselves.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although pink slips are being handed out by the hundreds at some area companies, one local firm is doing something rather unusual these days: hiring in droves. Computer Sciences Corp., of Moorestown, is adding about 165 employees to its payroll to help it deliver on a $744 million federal contract it was awarded earlier this month. The 12-year contract from the Department of Defense involves computerizing the paperwork by which the military builds, maintains and supports hundreds of thousands of weapons parts.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2000 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Think of Germany as a want ad that reads: immigrants needed immediately. Although it is still the economic powerhouse of Europe, Germany is lagging in information technologies and plans to import 20,000 computer experts this year from Russia, India and other countries. That prospect is forcing a reexamination of immigration attitudes and nationalist tendencies that have long troubled the German soul. Germany's demand for skilled foreigners is the latest spark in a European debate over the future of the Continent, as its ethnic map is being redrawn by globalization, a low birthrate, and a surge of immigrants seeking better lives.
NEWS
February 16, 1997 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They have a plan. Now, they need money. Members of a technology committee have presented the Board of Education with a five-year, multimillion-dollar framework for boosting the computer resources available in the township's schools. Bringing the proposal to fruition, though, will require funds the district may not have. Committee members have asked the school board to allocate 2 percent of the annual budget through 2001 toward purchasing computer equipment and hiring personnel to oversee technology.
NEWS
November 4, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Thousands of computers at university and military research centers throughout the United States were shut down yesterday when they were hit by what appears to be the worst attack to date of a disruptive computer program known as a "virus. " No serious damage to data was reported, and no security breaches were disclosed. "This is the first time that I know of that it has happened on this scale to larger systems," said Charley Kline, senior research programmer with the Computing Services Office at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Ill. The most worrisome invasion occurred at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory near San Francisco, one of two national labs where nuclear weapons are designed.
NEWS
February 11, 1999 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The former principal of the Delran Intermediate School, accused of possessing child pornography in his school office, was sentenced yesterday to three months of probation and fined $1,000 on a lesser charge of official misconduct. Judge Donald P. Gaydos of Burlington County Superior Court said that he believed Steven R. Davidson, 38, of Bensalem, Bucks County, was "a stellar pillar of the community," but that he made a mistake when he viewed pornography on the Internet while at school.
NEWS
August 6, 2012
In "The Betrayal of the American Dream," Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele revisit their 1991 Inquirer series, "America: What Went Wrong," in which they forecast a decline of the middle class. Now, they document how actions going back three decades have left millions of Americans in economic ruin. Excerpts from their book continue in Currents every Sunday through Aug. 19.   Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele On his last day on the job, Kevin Flanagan, after clearing out a few personal effects and putting them in boxes in the back of his Ford Ranger, left the building where he'd worked for seven years.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1992 | By Neill A. Borowski, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The boss spent three weekends typing a new budget into a spreadsheet. Now it's your job to copy it. OHMYGOSH! It's gone! You've erased the boss' work from the computer! Don't despair - your job is not lost. In fact, the erased file probably isn't lost either. While resurrecting erased files is second nature to experienced computer users, the retrieval of "lost" data seems downright mystical to many new or occasional users. Every user bungles once in a while, whether from being too eager to clean up a hard disk, from not having that extra floppy available and erasing one that held important information, or from simply misidentifying the file that's being erased.
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NEWS
August 6, 2012
In "The Betrayal of the American Dream," Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele revisit their 1991 Inquirer series, "America: What Went Wrong," in which they forecast a decline of the middle class. Now, they document how actions going back three decades have left millions of Americans in economic ruin. Excerpts from their book continue in Currents every Sunday through Aug. 19.   Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele On his last day on the job, Kevin Flanagan, after clearing out a few personal effects and putting them in boxes in the back of his Ford Ranger, left the building where he'd worked for seven years.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2000 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Think of Germany as a want ad that reads: immigrants needed immediately. Although it is still the economic powerhouse of Europe, Germany is lagging in information technologies and plans to import 20,000 computer experts this year from Russia, India and other countries. That prospect is forcing a reexamination of immigration attitudes and nationalist tendencies that have long troubled the German soul. Germany's demand for skilled foreigners is the latest spark in a European debate over the future of the Continent, as its ethnic map is being redrawn by globalization, a low birthrate, and a surge of immigrants seeking better lives.
NEWS
April 7, 1999
Two of the most urgent needs in fighting crime in Philadelphia are accurate statistics and more police protection on the streets. Commissioner John Timoney is learning the hard way what his predecessors had to put up with - the system is more resistant to change than it is dedicated to fighting crime. He has been using computer specialists, trained at the University of Pennsylvania, to develop the sophisticated maps that guide police deployment and tactics. But the Fraternal Order of Police complained to the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board that this takes work away from cops.
NEWS
February 11, 1999 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The former principal of the Delran Intermediate School, accused of possessing child pornography in his school office, was sentenced yesterday to three months of probation and fined $1,000 on a lesser charge of official misconduct. Judge Donald P. Gaydos of Burlington County Superior Court said that he believed Steven R. Davidson, 38, of Bensalem, Bucks County, was "a stellar pillar of the community," but that he made a mistake when he viewed pornography on the Internet while at school.
NEWS
February 16, 1997 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
They have a plan. Now, they need money. Members of a technology committee have presented the Board of Education with a five-year, multimillion-dollar framework for boosting the computer resources available in the township's schools. Bringing the proposal to fruition, though, will require funds the district may not have. Committee members have asked the school board to allocate 2 percent of the annual budget through 2001 toward purchasing computer equipment and hiring personnel to oversee technology.
NEWS
December 1, 1996 | By Daniel S. Greenberg
Of the many forecasts for the next century, a safe one is that privacy will be a goner. The computer is already leading to that in medical recordkeeping, personal buying patterns and even in tracking our physical whereabouts. And we're only in the beginning stages of keeping tabs on everything about everyone. Every now and then, there's an outrageous assault on privacy, such as the recent surfacing of thousands of AIDS patients' names from a supposedly secure filing system.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1995 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Compaq Computer Corp. introduced its latest line of Presarios in September, the company wanted to prove that the new "screamers" could scorch the competition in the hotly contested home-computer market. The Houston computer company turned to a small, independent outfit in Conshohocken to prove its point. National Software Testing Laboratories Inc., more commonly known as NSTL, conducted a head-to-head competition between the Presarios and the latest machines from Packard-Bell, the leader in the home-computer market.
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the old days - say, about 1991 - college students who wanted to visit each other would walk across the hall. Now they use E-mail. In the old days - circa 1992 - those who needed help with calculus went to a tutor. Now they can use an electronic bulletin board. In the old days - like two months ago - discussions in Leslie Harris' class were done orally. Now 17 students tap their comments back and forth by machine. The machine, of course, is a computer, and it's changing the way students go to college.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1992 | By Neill A. Borowski, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The boss spent three weekends typing a new budget into a spreadsheet. Now it's your job to copy it. OHMYGOSH! It's gone! You've erased the boss' work from the computer! Don't despair - your job is not lost. In fact, the erased file probably isn't lost either. While resurrecting erased files is second nature to experienced computer users, the retrieval of "lost" data seems downright mystical to many new or occasional users. Every user bungles once in a while, whether from being too eager to clean up a hard disk, from not having that extra floppy available and erasing one that held important information, or from simply misidentifying the file that's being erased.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1991 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although pink slips are being handed out by the hundreds at some area companies, one local firm is doing something rather unusual these days: hiring in droves. Computer Sciences Corp., of Moorestown, is adding about 165 employees to its payroll to help it deliver on a $744 million federal contract it was awarded earlier this month. The 12-year contract from the Department of Defense involves computerizing the paperwork by which the military builds, maintains and supports hundreds of thousands of weapons parts.
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