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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1993 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"Sometimes I get an appetite for something downright apocalyptic," says a character in The Big Numbers, and by the time the remark is made those watching Craig Wright's play suspect that this yearning may indeed be satisfied. Already there have been ominous indications that something is not right in the world outside the deep basement computer room where Wright's odd, fascinating, crazy dark comedy is set. One of the two computer operators who are the play's main characters has been finding very large figures on his computer screen and, although we don't learn until three-quarters of the way through the play just exactly what he is counting, it's obvious that these big numbers bode ill for the future of humankind.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | by Tom Schmidt and Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writers
Alfonso Cruz had made a new life for himself, as a family man and auto mechanic, in Paterson, N.J. He was working at his job at a Goodyear Service Center there yesterday when FBI agents arrested him as a fugitive in the slaying 20 years ago of a South Philadelphia woman, Mary Dupoldt. Philadelphia police said Cruz fell victim to the computer age. A police spokesman said investigators, who had a couple of boxes filled with information on Cruz, scanned the name of the fugitive through a new software package called Fast Track, and found that he worked at the service center.
NEWS
January 21, 1989 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
At one time, he was riding high with a scheme that had duped the city managing director's office, Antioch University in Philadelphia, even the U.S. Navy. But yesterday, a subdued Jack Bullock - one-time owner of a thriving computer business - stood in silence as Common Pleas Court Judge Legrome D. Davis issued his verdict: Guilty times 14. Bullock was found guilty of theft, fraud and a host of other charges in connection with the theft of about $135,000 worth of computer equipment from the University of Pennsylvania bookstore.
NEWS
January 7, 1988 | By JOANNE SILLS, Daily News Staff Writer
Following the arrests of two Cheyney University computer center employees who allegedly improved students' grades for a fee, the school is taking disciplinary action against the students involved and is tightening academic record security. The university will assess each case of bogus grade-changing on "its own merit," with penalties ranging from expulsion to the re-taking of courses, said Vernon Clark, vice president of academic affairs. Clark said some students have already been expelled, though he would not say how many.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1996 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In the 50 years since ENIAC was born at the University of Pennsylvania, musicians and designers have been invited to adapt the computer to their art. In programs at Penn on Tuesday marking the computer's 50th anniversary, artists showed how they were faring with the computer. French-born musician Laetitia Sonami showed her piece, titled . . . and she keeps coming back for more, as an exploration of the relation of gesture and sound. Not quite dance, the piece grows from slight movements Sonami makes while wired and plugged in like a spacewalker.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Joe Megahey, a senior at Penncrest High School, discovered a college in West Virginia and beat the application deadline with some help from the EASI- APP computer system. Megahey, 18, who wants to pursue a career in communications, said he was unsure earlier this year which colleges matched his interests. So Nancy Peters, director of Penncrest's Career Center, introduced him to EASI-APP, a computerized college pre-application system. "It helped me find the schools that had my major," Megahey said.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1988 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Keep it cool, keep it clean, and watch the eating, drinking and smoking. Sounds like a doctor's advice for you, but it is also good for your computer, according to Sorbus Inc., the nationwide computer-maintenance outfit based in Frazer, Chester County. Here are some pointers from Sorbus for keeping your personal computer happy: Keep the system away from sunlight, heat vents, radiators and open windows. Avoid etching, or burning a stationary image on the inner surface of the screen.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1987 | By Idris Michael Diaz, Inquirer Staff Writer
ENIAC, the world's first computer developed at the University of Pennsylvania, is headed for Japan as part of Philadelphia's contribution to the World Exposition of Historical Cities. The exposition will be held in Kyoto from Nov. 8 to 29 to commemorate that city's installation as the capital of Japan 1,200 years ago. Officially, the exhibit is only open to cities that are more than 1,000 years old and have a population exceeding 500,000 people. While Philadelphia obviously does not fit both of those criteria, the city was invited to attend because numerous area businesses have been active in Kyoto, according to Lee T. Stull, managing director of the Greater Philadelphia International Network.
NEWS
November 16, 2004 | By Jen A. Miller
I know, I know. I should have backed up. I should have kept a zip drive attached to my computer and, every night, transferred my work onto a little piece of plastic that would have been my savior when the inevitable happened. My hard drive died. It started out like a normal morning. Typity, type, type. I shut the lid of my laptop, giving it a little rest while I went out to lunch. When I came back to the office, I found that, apparently, my computer hadn't rested enough. I opened the laptop, and instead of hearing the usual clicking and whirring of the computer coming back to life, I didn't hear anything.
NEWS
March 31, 1988 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fried-chicken bucket and paper clips were the first to go. They were followed by adding machine tapes, back-straining docket books and tons and tons of paper. All fell victim to computers in Montgomery County. They were replaced by a high-tech system that has landed the county a reputation as the nation's premier court-record keeper. As the decade-long automation project nears completion, county officials boast that their computer not only provides instant accounts of almost everything that happens in the Norristown courthouse, but that it is a money- making venture as well.
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