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NEWS
February 19, 1995 | By Ty Tagami, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With the word retool on every good hiring director's lips, people being interviewed for jobs can expect a serious grilling on everything from spreadsheet cells to ASCII text. Jobless Pennsylvanians with computer phobia can get a push down the information superhighway - and a boost in their job prospects - from a free, 172-hour computer literacy course given by the Berkeley Education & Training Center. "We know what software's happening and what's not," said Ron Spangler, spokesman for the company.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1988 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
You're selecting furniture, but you're not sure how a certain fabric will look on the couch you had in mind. You're also nervous about how it will fit with the furniture you already have. Somehow, you'd like to do more than just imagine what it looks like before investing dollars and distress in a redecorating scheme. What do you do? Using a new technology being developed by Intel Corp. in Princeton, a specially equipped personal computer will be able to simulate the room you've designed.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
Burlington City Common Council last week voted 11-0 to approve an ordinance that recodifies the city's ordinances. Council President William J. Tillinghast said that under the plan, computer technology will enable the city for the first time to keep up to date in tracking its ever-changing ordinance book. Because the ordinances will be compiled in a loose-leaf binder instead of in a bound book as is the case at present, record-keeping will be much easier, said Tillinghast.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | By Michael L. Rozansky, Inquirer Staff Writer
His slender body is paralyzed and he is unable to speak, but that didn't stop Ralph Unks from expressing his joy. "Ralph had the biggest smile we've seen on his face in 11 years," said his wife, Nancy. "And he was able to hold it, without it turning into a cry. . . . It was almost a grin. " Recently, Unks, 45, learned that the First Presbyterian Church in Flourtown had raised far more than the $39,645 needed to buy him a high-technology computer system that would allow him to communicate with his wife and two daughters in more expressive ways than a blink or a weak hand squeeze.
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Slats Grobnik said: "I've been thinking about the death penalty and maybe I have the solution to make everybody happy. " Please, that is a subject I would just as soon avoid. "How come? You've written about it lots of times and said you're in favor of it. " I know, and all it does is arouse strong emotions. I hear from people condemning me for being bloodthirsty and from those who praise me for being bloodthirsty. No matter how you look at it, I come out sounding like an aspiring hangman.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
For the next six months, roofing contractor Petro Hawryluk will go to work each day, continue living in his Huntingdon Valley home and visit his ailing 90-year-old mother on weekends and holidays. Life during the day will not change much for the Polish immigrant who was found guilty in April by a federal district court jury of filing false tax returns. But while home in the evening, Hawryluk, 57, will be in high-tech incarceration, monitored by a computer in Florida. On Monday, U.S. District Court Judge Clarence Newcomer sentenced Hawryluk to five years' probation and a fine of $10,000.
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a few short years, computer wizard Tom Williams evolved from avid moviegoer to cutting-edge moviemaker. Williams graduated from Villanova in 1986 with a degree in computer science and a desire to work in computer graphics. Just six years later, he and his team at George Lucas' Industrial Light + Magic made cinematic history when they created the lifelike dinosaurs for Jurassic Park. Williams returned to his alma mater Monday night to talk about his job and his work overseeing computer graphics at ILM. Speaking to a standing-room-only crowd in St. Mary's Hall Auditorium, Williams explained that cinematic special effects have progressed from photographic chemicals, models, blue screens and stop-motion photography to computer-generated images.
NEWS
December 7, 2007 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare this week began contacting 86 clients whose personal information was on a computer that was stolen from a welfare office, officials said. Anne C. Bale, a spokeswoman for the Department of Public Welfare, said yesterday that the computer was stolen in a Nov. 13 burglary at the Philadelphia County Assistance Office Center District, 900 N. Marshall St. There was no indication that any of the information on the computer had been used inappropriately, Bale said.
NEWS
May 8, 1988 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Yoni Shear, 11, moved a plastic computer device called a "mouse" around in circles on the desk, trying to get the corresponding arrow on his screen to land on the word "puppy. " His classmates Atya Long, 10, and Stanyell Saunders, 10, yelled out directions to him. Yoni clicked the button on the control device a few times and, presto, a black-and-white puppy wagged its tail and trotted across the screen. The three Overlook Elementary School fifth graders giggled. Yoni moved the mouse again and clicked the button.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2001 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lisa Anthony, a junior majoring in computer science at Drexel University, finds herself in rare company. While government statistics show that only 28 percent of the bachelor's degrees in computer science nationwide are awarded to women, Anthony is on track to earn combined bachelor's and master's degrees in the field in June 2002. Just 26 percent of master's degrees in computer science go to women, and very few of them pursued both degrees at once. Her efforts haven't gone unnoticed.
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