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BUSINESS
December 5, 1989 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Costs associated with the acquisition of rival CVN Cos. Inc. and conversion of a computer system took a toll on third-quarter profits for QVC Network Inc. The West Chester company, which sells merchandise through televised home- shopping shows, reported yesterday that it had remained profitable despite the higher costs and that it had managed to significantly improve its revenues for the quarter. The computer-system conversion caused delays in the processing of orders during late October, the company said.
NEWS
August 1, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
If this were a movie, the computer would be an alien from outer space, munching away at the work force, getting closer and closer to the hero and heroine . . . Twenty-five years ago, in "2001: A Space Odyssey," a computer named HAL decided to do in the humans who were giving him orders and take over. But today you don't need a movie to see computers taking over. It's all around you. Optimists compare the impact of the computer on jobs to that of the automobile. As in: Yes, many horseshoe and buggy-whip makers lost out, but look at all the new jobs that were created by the auto and gasoline industries.
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a few short years, computer wizard Tom Williams evolved from avid movie- goer to cutting-edge moviemaker. Williams graduated from Villanova in 1986 with a degree in computer science and a desire to work in computer graphics. Just six years later, he and his team at George Lucas' Industrial Light + Magic made cinematic history when they created the lifelike dinosaurs for Jurassic Park. Williams returned to his alma mater Monday night to talk about his job and his work overseeing computer graphics at ILM, which is renowned for its work on cinematic special effects.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1986 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Luke Skywalker attacked The Empire's sinister Death Star in the movie Star Wars, viewers felt themselves to be right in the co-pilot's seat next to Luke. As the computer-drawn walls of the Death Star whizzed past and Luke's spacecraft twisted to dodge deadly laser beams, it seemed as though the audience was being sucked into the action. That kind of action, although on a less dramatic scale, has moved from the movie screen onto office computer screens. Architects, designers and engineers are beginning to explore the computer's capabilities to help them do their work faster and more cheaply - and, in some cases, to do things that were simply too time-consuming to do before.
NEWS
July 9, 1998 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
The School District is facing a $36 million price tag to overhaul its computers. The projected cost is more than twice the original estimate of $14.5 million to avoid dreaded year 2000 crashes, and to link several networks into one system. The year 2000 crashes are linked to the fact that many computers are programmed to recognize years beginning with the number 19. Experts across the country have warned that come Jan. 1, 2000, many computerized records could be reduced to chaos.
NEWS
July 4, 2011
Robert Morris, 78, a cryptographer who helped develop the Unix computer operating system, which controls an increasing number of the world's computers, died Sunday in Lebanon, N.H. The cause was complications of dementia, his wife, Anne Farlow Morris, said. Known as an original thinker in computer science, Mr. Morris also played an important clandestine role in planning what was probably the nation's first cyberwar: the electronic attacks on Saddam Hussein's Iraqi government in the months leading up to the Persian Gulf War of 1991.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Pentagon, whose problems buying sophisticated planes, tanks, and ships are well documented, has similar trouble buying ordinary computers it needs to keep track of its people and parts, congressional investigators said yesterday. The General Accounting Office's top official told a congressional hearing that eight major Defense Department computer systems have doubled in price to $2.1 billion and are years behind schedule, even though a top-level Pentagon panel was created to keep such things from happening.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | By Sandra Sardella, Special to The Inquirer
Lindenwold school officials said they plan to purchase new computer hardware and software for their administrative offices, a move they say is necessary to comply with changes in state requirements for school budget accounting procedures. Computer programming at the board office must be upgraded so bookkeeping conforms with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), which will be required of all school districts by July 1, 1993, officials said. "We're just looking into our options right now," said School Superintendent Edward Zirpoli, who added that money would be set aside in the next school year's budget for the system.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1992 | By Charlie Frush, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Most evenings, Marilyn Huret climbs on the treadmill at her home in Yardley, switches on her personal computer, dials a telephone number and settles in for 90 minutes of fun and exercise. The exercise comes on the treadmill; the fun, on the computer. She puts the keyboard on a rack at the front of the treadmill, props the monitor up behind it, then engages body and mind. Huret is addicted to computer games, and the first time she discovered she could get a myriad of them through a simple phone call, she called it "seventh heaven.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1997 | By Sara Sherr, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sci-fi Japanimation lit the room's video screens and electronic beats whirred on the sound system Sunday night as the British quintet Radiohead opened its Electric Factory show with "Fitter Happier," the only song on its latest CD, OK Computer, to be sung by . . . a computer. On the track, an eerie, processed voice recites an index of contentment indicators: "more productive, comfortable, not drinking too much, regular exercise at the gym (three days a week), getting on better with your associate employee contemporaries.
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