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NEWS
November 20, 2015
MOST Philadelphians are either down on the city, or skeptical of its chances for future success. That's my reading of a novel city survey assessing attitudes rather than demographics, from the always engaging Pew Charitable Trusts. Rather than lump Philadelphians into the familiar categories of age, income, race, gender, religion or political party, it harnessed computer power to create four attitudinal groups: Dissatisfied Citizens, Die-hard Loyalists, Uncommitted Skeptics, Enthusiastic Urbanists.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2015 | Chuck Darrow, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
Mitch Albom has spent the past three-plus decades as an award-winning newspaper columnist, best-selling author and popular radio talk-show host in his adopted hometown of Detroit. But, he admitted during a recent phone call, he'd have given up all this fame and fortune he has accrued if he could have made his living as a musician. When asked to elaborate, Albom, 57, whose latest novel, The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto , is a mix of history and fiction about a celebrated guitar player, didn't hesitate to set the record straight about where his priorities lie. "I would probably go back and do it if they just promised me a steady paycheck," said the Passaic, N.J.-born multimedia giant who grew up in Haddon Township, Camden County.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
An FBI data expert told a Philadelphia jury Wednesday that he found a prodigious number of deleted file fragments on accused stalker John Hart's computers, including two Internet programs that enable a user to disguise the computer's identity. Michael Irvin testified that the websites - "Spoof Your IP Address" and "Spoofing Demystified" - offer software that would have let Hart cloak his computer during Internet searches for private information about CBS3 newscaster Erika von Tiehl. Spoofing is the term for making a computer's unique Internet Protocol (IP)
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | By Clem Murray, INQUIRER STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
Inquirer staff photographer Clem Murray, on vacation at a Mexican resort, suddenly found himself and a companion in the path of Hurricane Patricia. Without time to evacuate, they hoped for the best. We left our room a little after 2 p.m. Friday and were escorted about 100 yards to the back of our resort, the Grand Mayan in Nuevo Vallarta, to an immense concrete building that looked like a parking garage, rising five levels. The building indeed housed cars but was also home to numerous departments of the Vidanta Resorts, including the executive offices, accounting, telemarketing and one level for the maintenance department.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Joshua delights in solving computer problems, and he excels at it. Those who know the 11-year-old say he is an IT expert. When not on the computer, Joshua can frequently be found surfing the Web on his iPad. He also enjoys swimming and taking drum lessons. Joshua does well in school, where he benefits from a small class size and individual attention. He is passionate about anything relating to science. He especially loves learning about dinosaurs and sea creatures. Last semester, he earned three school achievement awards, which mean a lot to him. He plans to work hard to receive more awards.
NEWS
September 19, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
American Airlines said its computers were back online after problems Thursday that grounded flights headed to Dallas, Chicago, and Miami. Flightaware.com listed 382 delays for American flights. "Issues started at noon Eastern Time and were resolved by 1:30 p.m. Eastern," American spokesman Casey Norton said. "We extended the groundstop to 2:15 p.m. Eastern. " American flights destined for Dallas-Fort Worth, Chicago O'Hare, and Miami International airports were held on the ground at their departure cities until the problems were resolved.
NEWS
September 17, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
A NORTH Philadelphia man has been indicted for allegedly defrauding a federal program that donates federal agencies' unused computer equipment to schools and educational nonprofits. Benjamin Twiggs, 37, of Seltzer Street near 25th, was charged Monday with making a false statement and transportation of goods taken by fraud, according to U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger. Twiggs in 2013 filed phony paperwork with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security indicating that he represented an IRS-recognized tax-exempt organization, the Philadelphia Urban Technology Institute, according to the indictment.
NEWS
September 7, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was 14 hours after the start of the PennApps Hackathon at the Wells Fargo Center and Max Bareiss, a student at Rowan University, showed no sign of fatigue as he bent over his laptop churning out computer code. He and fellow Rowan students Nick Felker and Christopher Frederickson were hard at work Saturday, trying to develop a computer application clever enough to snag some of the more than $30,000 in prize money provided by event sponsors. Their idea: an app to monitor pets for signs of injury, remotely alerting owners to problems by text.
NEWS
September 2, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert M. Rinier Sr., 85, of Marlton, a computer specialist who in retirement was a part-time evening manager at food markets in Marlton and Medford, died of complications from lung cancer Friday, Aug. 28, at Virtua Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly. Born in Darby, Mr. Rinier attended Overbrook High School but "left to go to work, because his father had died," his wife, Helen, said. He worked at a market in Philadelphia, then in 1950 began a 35-year government career, mostly as a computer specialist at the Frankford Arsenal.
NEWS
August 6, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terry K. Bootle went into the Air Force in July 1958 with a South Carolina high school education. But by the time he retired as a chief master sergeant for security in September 1986, he had earned a bachelor's degree in education at what is now Texas State University in 1977. And he had followed that with a master's in human relations from what is now Webster University in St. Louis in 1978. Mr. Bootle took the Air Force opportunities to earn his degrees because he figured that "if he had more training, he could progress," his wife, Christina, said.
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