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NEWS
September 2, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert M. Rinier Sr., 85, of Marlton, a computer specialist who in retirement was a part-time evening manager at food markets in Marlton and Medford, died of complications from lung cancer Friday, Aug. 28, at Virtua Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly. Born in Darby, Mr. Rinier attended Overbrook High School but "left to go to work, because his father had died," his wife, Helen, said. He worked at a market in Philadelphia, then in 1950 began a 35-year government career, mostly as a computer specialist at the Frankford Arsenal.
NEWS
August 6, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terry K. Bootle went into the Air Force in July 1958 with a South Carolina high school education. But by the time he retired as a chief master sergeant for security in September 1986, he had earned a bachelor's degree in education at what is now Texas State University in 1977. And he had followed that with a master's in human relations from what is now Webster University in St. Louis in 1978. Mr. Bootle took the Air Force opportunities to earn his degrees because he figured that "if he had more training, he could progress," his wife, Christina, said.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
United Airlines grounded takeoffs nationwide for nearly two hours Wednesday morning, snarling flights for thousands during the busy summer travel period because of a computer problem. It was the second computer woe for the Chicago-based carrier in five weeks. On June 2, about 150 flights were grounded because of an issue with the flight-dispatching system. Five of United's 18 daily nonstop flights out of Philadelphia International Airport were delayed about two hours, said Mary Flannery, airport spokeswoman.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taylor W. Cole, 92, of Chestnut Hill, a pioneer in high school computer instruction as well as a sailor and a father of nine, died Saturday, June 13, of Alzheimer's disease at Arbor Terrace at Chestnut Hill. Mr. Cole taught mathematics and computer science at Episcopal Academy from 1967 to 1987, when the school, now in Newtown Square, was in Merion. He was known for his ability to engage and support all students, particularly those who had little confidence in their math skills. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, long before the advent of the personal computer, Mr. Cole taught computer programming by means of a dial-up terminal connected to a mainframe computer elsewhere.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
CITY OFFICIALS blew more than $500,000 on a failed computer technology upgrade that was supposed to track how the city used a $30.8 million grant from the U.S. Housing and Urban Development to combat homelessness. Now, officials with the city's Office of Supportive Housing are scrambling to find - and pay - a new vendor to quickly fix the mess, or potentially risk losing millions of dollars in HUD money needed to fund critical homeless-assistance programs in Philadelphia. "I think it's premature to talk about losing funding on any level," HUD spokesman Brian Sullivan said this week.
NEWS
June 13, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A volunteer fire chief in Camden County "abused the trust placed in him" by using his fire station computer to share files of child pornography, authorities said. John Terruso, 44, chief of the Audubon Park Volunteer Fire Company, was arrested at the station Wednesday evening and charged with distribution and possession of child pornography. He has been suspended from his position. Investigators seized four laptop computers and other electronic devices, and found more than 1,000 files of suspected child pornography, the New Jersey Attorney General's Office said.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shelly Bronstein took a bus and two subways every day from Broomall to Temple University. After classes, she worked two jobs, including one as elevator operator at a women's clothing store - hardly a prospect-rich environment. She dated, but rarely met guys outside her political science program. So when she saw the coupon in the Temple News in 1965 for Operation Match - the nation's first big computer dating service - she mailed in her $3, a lot of money in those days, hoping for fun and dates.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The concentrated heat radiating from your laptop. The sudden roar of the cooling fan from inside your desktop computer. Familiar signs of wasted energy, caused largely by the increasing numbers of transistors crammed into the innards of our electronic gadgets. As you reach once again for that charging cable, be aware that an amiable pair of University of Pennsylvania physicists may have hit on the beginnings of a solution: a new kind of material called topological insulators.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
I admit, I was quite horrified - like, shaken to my very core - by Unfriended , a horror pic with a new gimmick that likely will spawn an entire subgenre of more substandard rubbish. Unfriended unfolds entirely on a computer screen, the story and dialogue taking place among characters engaged in multiple acts of multiple-partner Skyping, Facebooking, and Googling. Possibly the single most uncinematic device ever used in a film, the gimmick must have made the studio suits jump with joy. Talk about low overhead!
BUSINESS
April 3, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
It can happen to anyone, including the tech-savvy. You click on a seemingly harmless link, or don't even know what went wrong. Suddenly, you lose access to your own computer, and all your crucial files - or, even worse, files shared by a business. How much would you pay to regain control? Market testing by the bad guys - yes, the tools of capitalism thrive in the Net's back alleys, just as in Silicon Valley - seems to suggest that consumers will pay from $500 to $700 for an outright ransom demand, and that businesses might fork over thousands.
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