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NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
'He was an amazing human being who is finally, rightfully, getting recognition for the great advances he made," Benedict Cumberbatch says about Alan Turing, the British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and computer pioneer who led the team of code-breakers responsible for cracking Nazi Germany's daunting Enigma machine. Cumberbatch, of course, is playing no small part in seeing to it that Turing gets his due: In The Imitation Game , opening Christmas Day at area theaters, the actor is Turing - a deeply complicated figure whose breakthroughs at Bletchley Park, the top-secret intelligence enclave set up in 1939 in Buckinghamshire, are credited with bringing World War II to a speedier end, thus saving hundreds of thousands of lives.
NEWS
October 1, 2014
SOMETHING WAS wrong with my computer, the caller told me. He said his systems had detected a virus. (My computer had been rather slow lately.) He said he was a computer technician with Microsoft. "How did you get my number?" I asked. "You registered on the site," he said. It was possible. Before he could help me, the man said he needed remote access to my computer. He immediately began to give me instructions on how to allow him to take over my machine. At that point, my skepticism kicked in. "You know, this sounds awfully like a scam," I said.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flower-arranging class at Barclay Friends, a West Chester nursing home with expansive gardens, was winding down when horticulturist Cheryl Bjornson pulled out her newest tool: a computer system called Linked Senior. It's loaded with activities meant to appeal to audiences like Bjornson's - 13 quiet, aged ladies with small vases of zinnias before them and one sleeping man. To liven things up, Bjornson displayed a garden trivia game on a giant screen. A woman who used to work at Waterloo Gardens correctly chose the number of flower species (between 250,000 and 500,000)
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
AS IF TRYING to block out the potentially damaging evidence the jury was hearing, Christina Regusters yesterday shuffled through stacks of legal papers, jotted notes, and rarely looked up. If Regusters, 21, were paying attention, she would have heard Michael Moore, an FBI digital-evidence forensic expect, telling the jury that her laptop computer was used to conduct dozens of Internet searches that appeared to link her to the Jan. 14, 2013, kidnapping...
NEWS
August 24, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A computer malfunction has saved about 17,000 motorists, including hundreds in four South Jersey towns, from getting $85 tickets for running red lights. The company that operates red-light cameras for 17 New Jersey towns, American Traffic Solutions Inc. of Tempe, Ariz., has notified the state that a computer glitch occurred between May 28 and June 30 and resulted in motorists not receiving notices of violations that had occurred earlier this year. Under state law, if a ticket is not served within 90 days, it must be dismissed.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Computer hackers traced to China stole personal data belonging to 4.5 million patients who used hospitals owned by Community Health Systems, which includes 20 hospitals in Pennsylvania and one in South Jersey. The stolen information included patient names, addresses, birth dates, and telephone and Social Security numbers, but not credit card or medical information, according to a report filed with the federal government by Community Health. "The company is providing appropriate notification to affected patients and regulatory agencies as required by law," the report said.
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Loretta Luff had taken a break from her Sunday wash when she sat down at her living room desk, and began checking e-mail and playing spider solitaire on her laptop. The Braves were beating the Phillies on the TV behind her, and her toy poodles, Marie and Gigi, rested nearby. Then, said Luff, 72, her Dell Inspiron exploded, spraying battery acid and computer parts all over her and the carpet, as far as eight feet behind her. "The computer blew back, and everything else came toward me," Luff said Monday.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The huge volume of e-mails and public comments over the proposed rule creating Internet fast lanes and slow lanes crashed part of the Federal Communications Commission's aging computer system earlier this month, an agency official confirmed Thursday. Spokeswoman Kim Hart said the FCC's 17-year-old public-comment system couldn't handle the overwhelming electronic responses. The 36-hour crash came days after HBO comedian John Oliver - formerly of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart - performed a 13-minute on-air rant on the FCC's open-Internet proposal as bad for consumers and told his audience to shoot comments to the FCC. Oliver compared appointing former cable industry lobbyist Tom Wheeler to head the FCC to hiring a dingo, a wild Australian dog, to babysit your baby.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Chester County teacher faces dozens of charges of possessing and distributing child pornography and was scheduled to turn himself in Wednesday, the state Attorney General's Office said. Joseph Fortunato, 60, of Lancaster, resigned from his teaching position at Devon Preparatory School on Monday. He has been charged with 20 counts of possession of child pornography, eight counts of distribution of child pornography, and a related charge. Police investigated an online peer-to-peer sharing network and found the IP address of Fortunato's computer.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Say you're sitting in a coffee shop, and pull out your laptop or tablet to check your Web mail or bank balance. Fleetingly, you may wonder just how secure these things are. But then you're reassured by a Web address that begins with "https" and displays a comforting icon: a padlock. We learned last week that we were a little too comforted by those symbols of security - each signs that a website uses a protocol known as SSL, in which the first S stands for secure . For two years - ever since a German engineer updated a section of code on New Year's Eve 2011 - a widely used version, OpenSSL, has been anything but secure, thanks to a bug nicknamed Heartbleed.
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