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BUSINESS
June 28, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The huge volume of e-mails and public comments over the proposed rule creating Internet fast lanes and slow lanes crashed part of the Federal Communications Commission's aging computer system earlier this month, an agency official confirmed Thursday. Spokeswoman Kim Hart said the FCC's 17-year-old public-comment system couldn't handle the overwhelming electronic responses. The 36-hour crash came days after HBO comedian John Oliver - formerly of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart - performed a 13-minute on-air rant on the FCC's open-Internet proposal as bad for consumers and told his audience to shoot comments to the FCC. Oliver compared appointing former cable industry lobbyist Tom Wheeler to head the FCC to hiring a dingo, a wild Australian dog, to babysit your baby.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Chester County teacher faces dozens of charges of possessing and distributing child pornography and was scheduled to turn himself in Wednesday, the state Attorney General's Office said. Joseph Fortunato, 60, of Lancaster, resigned from his teaching position at Devon Preparatory School on Monday. He has been charged with 20 counts of possession of child pornography, eight counts of distribution of child pornography, and a related charge. Police investigated an online peer-to-peer sharing network and found the IP address of Fortunato's computer.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Say you're sitting in a coffee shop, and pull out your laptop or tablet to check your Web mail or bank balance. Fleetingly, you may wonder just how secure these things are. But then you're reassured by a Web address that begins with "https" and displays a comforting icon: a padlock. We learned last week that we were a little too comforted by those symbols of security - each signs that a website uses a protocol known as SSL, in which the first S stands for secure . For two years - ever since a German engineer updated a section of code on New Year's Eve 2011 - a widely used version, OpenSSL, has been anything but secure, thanks to a bug nicknamed Heartbleed.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
WALL TOWNSHIP Most people might see computers from the '60s, '70s, and '80s as useless relics from another time, dust collectors to be tossed out with scraps from the dinner table. But Evan Koblentz and about 300 others from across the world attending the annual Vintage Computer Festival East see the collection of plastic, glass, and circuitry as art and history. They revel in obsolete technology and will be in nerd nirvana during computer demonstrations to be held Saturday and Sunday at the InfoAge Science Center on the 2200 block of Marconi Road.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Adler, 60, of Cherry Hill, a devoted husband and father with a love for computers, died at his home Sunday, March 16, after a five-month battle with lung cancer. "He fought a graceful, dignified battle against lung cancer," his wife, Betty, said Monday. "He had excruciating pain the last five months. " Betty Adler, a health lawyer for the University of Pennsylvania/Penn Medicine and president of the Jewish Federation of Southern New Jersey, said she and her husband knew each other from childhood.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A blur of motion on the ice, Haley Beavers spun into the air to attempt a triple loop - one of the standard jumps in the repertoire of an elite skater. She did not quite make it, stumbling on her landing at the University of Delaware. No matter. Within minutes, a sleek computer simulation showed the 14-year-old that if she drew her arms in just a bit closer, she would be golden. Call it better skating through physics. Four of the five U.S. Olympic singles skaters competing this month in Russia have used the simulation software, in a joint project between researchers at Delaware and a Maryland company called C-Motion Inc. The next generation of Olympic hopefuls, such as Beavers, has lined up as well, using it to practice more efficiently and, ideally, cut down on the number of bone-jarring falls and injuries.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jennifer Kay bends down to push the orange button on the controller of her small, gray Lego robot. It comes to life, executing a series of short commands Kay had linked together in just a few seconds by dragging blocks around on her computer screen: Say, "Good morning. " Roll forward for one second. Stop. Kay, a computer science professor at Rowan University, looks up, pleased. Seeing the robot move according to its instructions is so satisfying, she said, that it's a natural tool for making computer science education exciting.
NEWS
January 2, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
June Luther Cardosi, 83, of West Chester, one of the earliest woman computer programmers at Cape Canaveral in the early 1960s, died Friday, Dec. 27, of heart failure at a hospice. Mrs. Cardosi programmed flight trajectories and was a system analyst in the defense industry at Cape Canaveral and in San Diego. She served on the West Chester Area School District board on and off for 12 years, and was a founding member of the short-lived West Chester Area Tax $avers Association, which sought to save money in the district.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
KEVIN HART is mad as hell, and he's not afraid to let the world know. "Don't let the this [sic] bulls--- affect your mental, kids," the Philly-born comedian wrote yesterday in a Twitter post directed at the city's youth. "I love y'all and I will be back shortly. " Hart has to come back because a selfish thief capitalized on his charity. Last month, Hart donated 500 Sony Vaio computers to the city - 200 of which were given to the Parks and Recreation Department, which distributed them to 25 facilities in low-income areas.
REAL_ESTATE
December 8, 2013 | By Alison Burdo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Each month, many a Philadelphian digs through a loose assortment of stubby pencils and uncapped pens, crinkled take-out menus, orange-handled scissors, old batteries, and half-used rolls of tape hunting for a checkbook - untouched since its last use 30 days ago - to pay the rent. But to stay competitive in the digital era, industry observers say, landlords ought to offer an amenity that changes the monthly ritual from searching the junk drawer to surfing the Net: Online bill-paying.
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