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NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
A longtime Villanova professor accused of accessing child pornography on a campus computer in March had someone looking over his shoulder: a security firm that the university had hired to monitor its computer network. Within 20 minutes, BTB Security identified the building and floor where the computer was located and alerted Villanova, kicking off an investigation that led to the arrest of Christopher Haas, a tenured associate professor of history and classical studies. The discovery was one of many security breaches that BTB, a cybersecurity and digital-forensics company, says it uncovers for clients every year.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
THE CRIME is so new, the FBI doesn't really know how bad it is, but it knows ransomware extortion is a bad and growing threat. Ransomware is the umbrella name for different cybercrime viruses that kidnap your computer and hold it for ransom. The computer never leaves your home or business, but one type of virus freezes it, while another encrypts your files so you can't access them. Attacks are often accompanied by official-looking "notifications" on the monitor screen. In each case, the criminal hackers promise to release your computer in exchange for payment, which is ransom.
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Tia Yang, Staff Writer
John J. O'Neill, 89, of Blue Bell, a lead computer programmer on the Gemini space program in the 1960s, died of complications of cancer Monday, April 11, at Normandy Farms Estates. Mr. O'Neill was born in Philadelphia and raised in Easton, Pa. After high school, he served as a corpsman in the Navy on the Tranquillity during World War II. The Tranquillity saw action in the Pacific transporting wounded personnel. After his service, Mr. O'Neill attended Temple University, where he met his wife, Claire.
NEWS
February 29, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Edward J. Kaminski was a dinner-plate fisherman, comfortable seeking out blues and flounders for his kitchen from his 18-foot motorboat. Closer to land than to the ocean deep. But in the 1990s, he and a few older men ventured forth, joining a younger sailboat crew. "The young guys sailed to Bermuda, and raced in a regatta there," but they had to fly back to their jobs, his wife, Helen, said. "So it was the old guys who brought the boats back," with all the heavy lifting that the effort demanded.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2016 | By Erin Arvedlund, Staff Writer
In choosing a money manager, one key issue comes down to this: Would you rather have a human or a computer run your money? Last year, many investors voted for the computer, pulling money from "active" money managers who tried to pick individual stocks but failed to beat the market. Instead, investors piled money into "passive" funds that follow a benchmark, such as the S&P 500 index. Or they used "robo-advisers" - strict computer investing models or exchange-traded funds that track a specific group of shares.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Jerry Augustus, 83, a retired restaurateur and later a computer programmer for the Philadelphia Water Department, died Sunday, Jan. 31, of complications from a stroke at Philadelphia Nursing Home. A lifelong city resident, Mr. Augustus was the son of Dennis and Lela Dialismas Augustus. He attended Drexel University. As a teenager, he was a member of the choir of St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral. Active in many Greek life organizations, he was the national president of the Greek Orthodox Youth of America.
NEWS
December 8, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Slipping inside a red wooden booth containing a computer tablet mounted on a wall, Rutgers-Camden students typed in their names, interests, or whatever word popped into their heads. The Typomatic returned a list of words, some with no apparent connection and others political, poignant, or just funny: STARWARS transformed to STORYLESS , FREEDOM to THUGGERY , LEBRON to LEGEND . The pairs match visually when cut in half horizontally, according to a typeface designed by an artist behind the Typomatic machine.
NEWS
November 20, 2015
MOST Philadelphians are either down on the city, or skeptical of its chances for future success. That's my reading of a novel city survey assessing attitudes rather than demographics, from the always engaging Pew Charitable Trusts. Rather than lump Philadelphians into the familiar categories of age, income, race, gender, religion or political party, it harnessed computer power to create four attitudinal groups: Dissatisfied Citizens, Die-hard Loyalists, Uncommitted Skeptics, Enthusiastic Urbanists.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2015 | Chuck Darrow, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
Mitch Albom has spent the past three-plus decades as an award-winning newspaper columnist, best-selling author and popular radio talk-show host in his adopted hometown of Detroit. But, he admitted during a recent phone call, he'd have given up all this fame and fortune he has accrued if he could have made his living as a musician. When asked to elaborate, Albom, 57, whose latest novel, The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto , is a mix of history and fiction about a celebrated guitar player, didn't hesitate to set the record straight about where his priorities lie. "I would probably go back and do it if they just promised me a steady paycheck," said the Passaic, N.J.-born multimedia giant who grew up in Haddon Township, Camden County.
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