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Concept

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NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Drew Lazor, For The Daily News
FOR CHEFS, the number 86 holds such a sinister, teeth-chattering connotation that the eight might as well be replaced with double sixes. It's restaurant slang for a dish or ingredient that's been completely shot, a state of cupboard's-bare vulnerability brought about by poor planning, lackluster resource management, an unexpected slam of business or any combination of these things. Marshall Green speaks for most chefs when he calls a kitchen hampered by a list of nixed items his "absolute worst nightmare.
NEWS
February 4, 1987
An editorial published Monday about the Philadelphia Planning Commission's building-height proposals improperly failed to note that Mayor Goode's 1984 "skyscraper zone" was an interim concept. It was intended to control building heights until a Center City master plan with height rules was completed by the commission, working with the mayor's administration.
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | By Gail Krueger-Nicholson, Special to The Inquirer
A concept drawing to expand the Longwood Inn restaurant and motel from 30 to 184 rooms was approved by the East Marlborough Township Planning Commission Tuesday night. Ted Skiadas, owner of the inn on Route 1, east of Schoolhouse Road, presented a land development concept calling for expansion over 10 acres - two two-story buildings with a total of 80 motel rooms, three buildings with a total of 48 suites and 26 townhouse-style cottages. The commission approved the concept by a 4-to-2 vote, and Skiadas said he would bring the concept before the supervisors at their meeting tomorrow.
NEWS
August 13, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
Members of the Oxford Circle Townwatch were among townwatch groups in the Northeast that participated in the fourth annual National Night Out Tuesday to get people involved in fighting crime. The townwatch concept urges neighbors to watch each other's properties and to notify authorities when things seem wrong or out of place. Homeowners had been asked to turn on their outside lights and to sit on their porches during the event.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Revel, Revel, Revel . . . . That's all the noise one hears these days coming from the Jersey Shore - especially when it concerns new prospects for dining. Granted, the gleaming $2.4 billion tower of Atlantic City's latest casino resort is hard to miss. And with more than a dozen restaurant concepts involving some very big names, its spring debut has no doubt been the biggest food news to hit this casino town since the Borgata began A.C.'s high-end remake. Jose Garces should have Philadelphians' attention right off the bat with three restaurants: an outsize version of Amada with ocean views and flamenco; a jumbo Village Whiskey clone for gourmet burgers and booze; plus Nuevo Mex concept with a Distrito Cantina serving margaritas and a replica Guapo's Taco truck.
NEWS
July 31, 2011
The Inquirer is dramatically revamping its commentary pages starting Monday. The old concept of separate editorial and op-ed pages is being replaced by a new design that melds the two. Look for even livelier pages that include same-day responses to editorials and more interaction with the Editorial Board's "Say What?" blog, which you can find at www.philly.com/opinion . But don't let the new format fool you. Your favorite features and writers will be here, and some new ones added, including a daily poll.
NEWS
March 29, 2011
Paul Baran, 84, whose work with packaging data in the 1960s is credited with playing a role in the later development of the Internet, died of complications from lung cancer Saturday at his home in Palo Alto, Calif. Mr. Baran, who was raised in West Philadelphia and earned his bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Drexel University, is best known for the idea of "packet-switching," in which data are bundled into small packages and sent through a network. He outlined the concept while working on Cold War issues for the Rand Corp.
NEWS
January 8, 1986 | BY DAVE BARRY
Every now and then, I like to suggest surefire concepts by which you readers can make millions of dollars without doing any honest work. Before I tell you about the newest concept, I'd like to apologize to those of you who were stupid enough to attempt the previous one, which, as you may recall, involved opening up Electronic Device Destruction Centers. The idea there was that consumers would bring their broken electronic devices, such as television sets and VCRs, to the destruction centers, where trained personnel would whack them (the devices)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2002 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
"Music from all over the world, not just one sound," is the concept behind AfroRikan Vybe, set for the first Friday each month at Fluid, says Dennis Perez, who spins with Rich Medina. "I thought Philly needed that. " Three years ago, Perez fathered AfroRikan Vybe, recruiting Medina and Eric Colon. It started as a weekly party, though as of late, it has been curtailed to once a month. Perez, from Brooklyn, thought his concept would get lost in New York's night scene, so he brought it to Philly.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2011 | By Hillel Italie, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A new, posthumous story of science gone wrong is coming in November from the late Michael Crichton, with help by Richard Preston. Crichton, author of such blockbusters as Jurassic Park and The Andromeda Strain , died in 2008 having written one-third of Micro , a thriller about a biotech company in Hawaii and the graduate students who end up stranded and endangered in a rain forest. Preston, known for his best-selling nonfiction work about the Ebola virus, The Hot Zone , used Crichton's outline, reference materials, and notes to finish the book.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
UNION, N.J. - When they took the field in the bottom of the sixth inning, they were six outs away from the first state title for a girls' team in their school's history. They were so close they might have imagined the feel of the trophy in their hands and the exultation of thrusting their right index fingers in the air while posing for pictures. "We were right there," St. Joseph senior catcher Carly Testa said, tears forming on the corners of her eyes after the final game of her illustrious career.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Philadelphia developer Bart Blatstein paid a visit to this city Wednesday with his usual swagger as a doer vs. a talker. With more than 30 years as a developer, he boasted, he's done a lot on the other side of the river transforming neighborhoods, such as Northern Liberties, with hip restaurants and new housing behind his company, Tower Investments Inc. Now Blatstein has his sights on a down-on-its-luck, moribund high-end mall -...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The clothing you'll find in Joan Shepp's new Chestnut Street boutique stays true to her aesthetic: a heavily curated collection of designer women's wear that is dark in hue, architectural in silhouette, and of course, edgy. Yet the "concept" boutique, with its clean white walls and golden fixtures, evokes a freshness that is decidedly much more Shepp-y than 1616 Walnut ever was. There's a section for chic and crazy hats. (Shepp loves a bright beanie). And shoppers can check out a studio where products are photographed for her cyber-store operation.
NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Amelia Brust, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The wooden pews at St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church squeaked louder than usual Sunday. Thanks to a social media outreach campaign and word of mouth, a Mass mob hit the Fairmount South neighborhood to encourage people to attend church. An usher counted about 400 people in attendance, compared to the 100 who typically worship there on Sundays. "It was a grassroots thing. . . . We needed to have a parish that was willing to work with us," said organizer Ben DiFrancesco, 28. He worked with the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to spread the word about Mass Mob Philly.
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Although perfectly congenial, the Philadelphia Orchestra's high-concept program was up around the ozone Thursday when the Fauré Requiem was preceded by a succession of composers that spanned three centuries and as many nationalities - for no clear reason. Not knowing the connecting thread isn't a bad thing: Such things can reveal themselves over time. Hitting so many musical bases, though, translated into less cumulative impact, despite superb performances under guest conductor Alain Altinoglu.
SPORTS
December 23, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
The drive from Waco to Houston is so long and unremarkable that last week, when I passed a redwood-size statue of Sam Houston, I feared I'd fallen into a hallucinatory haze. But, no, the white, 67-foot-high likeness of the 19th-century Texas hero, which hovers like a mutant ghost above Interstate 45 in Huntsville, was as real as Billy Penn atop City Hall. Supersize Sam has been standing there like a Skull Island totem, frightening unsuspecting motorists, since 1994, which has to make him one of the more recent non-sports entries in the field of heroic statuary.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
A common frustration during the Internet era's version of the Cambrian explosion - the sudden appearance, in the six years since the iPhone's launch, of about a million mobile apps - boils down to this: We've developed this amazing thing. How do we get people to try it? It's a huge challenge for a small inventor. But even the largest businesses don't find it easy, which may explain why something new popped up recently on Route 202 in Malvern: a PNC "concept branch" that showcases how the $300 billion bank hopes to integrate technology into a business bound by hundreds of years of tradition.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Aria Health has proposed a "health-care village" for a 41-acre property in Lower Makefield Township, Bucks County. Aria's previous plan for the site in 2008 called for a hospital and medical-office complex, but that was stymied by community opposition. Aria officials presented the new concept Wednesday evening at a board of supervisors meeting, describing a potential development with medical offices, a physical rehabilitation facility, ambulatory care center, and clinical space.
NEWS
August 18, 2013 | By Curtis Skinner, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Carolina, 76, was rushed to the emergency room and admitted five times in the first 10 months of last year - four times in a two-month span - with heart and respiratory failure and flare-ups of gout. He is morbidly obese and has diabetes, sleep apnea, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Carolina is a very sick man. But he's happy. Since October, his poor health has qualified him for a new government experiment involving an old idea: His doctors make house calls. In the last 10 months, an ER visit led to a hospital admission only once.
SPORTS
March 29, 2013 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
When Mike Sutton talks about his injury and where it leaves his St. Augustine lacrosse team, two things stick out. The first is how calm he is about his team's prospects while he's sidelined. The second is just how much he cares about those prospects. Both offer insight into where St. Augustine is as a program and how it got there. "The kids stepping in know the role that they have to pursue," said Sutton, the area's most dangerous offensive player, who broke his right thumb in a March 16 scrimmage against Jackson Memorial.
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