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Concert Hall

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NEWS
August 22, 1992 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a move to kick-start the stalled fund drive for a new orchestra hall, the Philadelphia Orchestra has hired an experienced fund-raiser for the new position of vice president of external affairs. He is Donald A. Cooke, an executive at the Franklin Institute since 1981 whose main job for the last few years was to raise money for the new $73 million Tuttleman Omniverse Theater and Mandell Futures Center. Cooke will supervise and coordinate all the orchestra's fund-raising, marketing and public relations.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In 1973, when the Philadelphia Orchestra made history in China, Inquirer music critic Daniel Webster was there. Now David Patrick Stearns reports on the 2013 visit, building on this long relationship. TIANJIN, China - "Wasn't that a mud field last year?" It was an idle observation made as the Philadelphia Orchestra's buses cruised along the scenic route to the Tianjin Performing Arts Center for a Wednesday evening concert, passing meticulously landscaped parks filled with beds of plump crimson tulips.
NEWS
March 3, 1988
The Philadelphia Orchestra Association has given supporters new reasons to move beyond dithering and naysaying and to dig into their pockets for the orchestra's new concert hall. By deciding to build a slightly smaller auditorium and to opt for first-class rehearsal and backstage facilities, rather than things like a ballroom, the orchestra association demonstrated that it is putting art first. The size of the new hall is no minor concern. Architects and experts on acoustics are in wide agreement that a 3,000-seat capacity strains the limits of quality, and the orchestra had been talking of selling tickets for 3,100 seats.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1989 | By Barbara Beck, Daily News Staff Writer
The design for the new hall to house the Philadelphia Orchestra, unveiled yesterday by Robert Venturi and his architectural firm, Venturi, Rauch & Scott Brown, reveals a hall that, in many ways, will be more intimate than the Academy of Music. Seats will be placed on all sides of the orchestra, including behind it, reducing the distance of the farthest listener from the sound. The idea, Venturi said in a news conference at his offices in Manayunk, is similar to that employed by the Philharmonie, West Berlin's renowned concert hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1992 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the Philadelphia Orchestra decided to build a new concert hall in which to perform, the money to be raised from corporations, foundations and music-loving individuals, the naysayers said it couldn't be done. The naysayers were right: It couldn't be done. Or at least, it wasn't. In a little more than five years, the orchestra has raised a shade over $24 million toward the estimated cost, $112 million, of the new space. That estimate is nearly twice as much as the $60 million estimate in November 1986, when the Orchestra Association's board announced its plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1987 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
At one point in the discussions of the Philadelphia Orchestra's proposed new concert hall, recalls consultant Walter Moleski, someone asked if a Veterans Stadium-style scoreboard might be needed. The question was probably a bit extreme. Yet the very fact that it was asked indicates the extent to which planners are attempting to project a hall that will meet the orchestra's needs well into the 21st century. Central to these projections is the matter of recording. The orchestra has not made a record in its concert hall, the Academy of Music, since 1969.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1987 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra's decision to build a world-class concert hall may be the most significant cultural development in this city in half a century. And its impact, good or bad, on the city's landscape and culture will be with us for decades. This is the first in a continuing series that will, in coming weeks, explore the aesthetic, economic and social ramifications of this ambitious break with the past. Philadelphians don't build concert halls every day. Indeed, while the city has constructed two grand opera houses - one of which, the Academy of Music, has been the home of the Philadelphia Orchestra since its founding - it has never built a hall specifically for symphonic music.
NEWS
July 13, 1988 | BY STEPHEN SELL
In 1983, The Philadelphia Orchestra Association began a study of the need for a new concert hall, to supplement the venerable 130-year-old Academy of Music. In 1986, its Board of Directors, some of the Delaware Valley's leading citizens, voted to undertake this massive project, and to raise over $100 million privately. This effort, which will not call for any city funds, will provide a facility for the entire community to use for the next century. The Orchestra has been acquiring land for the new concert hall on the site bounded by Broad, Spruce, 15th and Delancey streets.
NEWS
July 6, 1988 | BY HARVEY SPEAR
Excuse me if I am wrong, but isn't the city of Philadelphia facing one of the largest deficits in its history? Hasn't there been some talk about raising real estate taxes and laying off city workers, all part of an attempt to balance the budget? If I'm right, then can someone tell me why the city is going along with the Philadelphia Orchestra's plan to build a concert hall that will cost city taxpayers nearly $2 million a year in lost real estate tax revenues. Maybe who you are outweighs what you can do for the city.
NEWS
November 10, 1997 | By CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
Having been in a wheelchair since I was 22, I have become a connoisseur of ramps. I have, my readers may have noticed, opinions on everything. But this - access - I know. I know what works and I know what doesn't. I know, for example, that retrofitting to make a building wheelchair accessible is hard and often very expensive. In fact, so expensive that no owner of, say, a modest second-story restaurant should have to bankrupt himself building an elevator. The Americans with Disabilities Act has the good sense to require only "readily achievable" retrofits.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra, which knows the way to London and Vienna, could use a little help these days finding the neighborhoods of the city in which it lives. In 15 years, the orchestra's wonderful free neighborhood concert series has brought it to North Philadelphia, the Navy Yard, Drexel Hill, and elsewhere. This year, the series consists of two concerts, and you might notice that the next one, July 30, has the intrepid Philadelphians venturing all the way to, well, their usual perch in Verizon Hall.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
It was an offer you couldn't refuse: a classic film, a great score, a great classical orchestra. There was much to like about the Philadelphia Orchestra's Thursday-night performance at the Mann Center of Nino Rota's score beneath a vivid screen showing The Godfather . There is also something of a feeling of treading water on these movie nights. In terms of developing audiences for classical music, the trend of pairing live orchestras with film likely will have little to show for it in the end. Still, it feels like justice to those of us who believe that as much art lies in that quivering line off to the side of the celluloid as in the main frame.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
DORTMUND, Germany - What is Yannick Nézet-Séguin doing on the back of a winged rhinoceros? And where is he expecting to go with such unconventional transportation? One possible answer in this poster image for his concerts here at the Konzerthaus Dortmund, in what used to be the heart of Germany's coal and steel industry, is that he's using his artistic frequent-flyer miles to ensure the Philadelphia Orchestra's success here. "I went to Yannick's first concert as chief conductor [in Philadelphia]
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - Meryl Streep, the Takacs Quartet, and Philip Roth aren't names likely to be seen together, much less people found in the same concert hall. Yet Princeton University Concerts presented all three in Richardson Auditorium on Friday evening, with the quartet playing Arvo Pärt and Franz Schubert, Streep reading extensively from the 2006 novel Everyman , and its author, Roth, listening in the audience - in a one-time-only event that guaranteed a packed house. Interdisciplinary events are a priority for Princeton University Concerts, this one building on a similar Takacs program presented at Carnegie Hall in 2007, with Philip Seymour Hoffman reading Roth's accounts of how everyday people decline, die, are grieved and remembered.
NEWS
June 1, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
SHENZHEN, China - Stopping traffic in the six-lane boulevards of this fast-moving Chinese city of 15 million requires an iron will and a Buddhist faith that the natural order of things will fall in your favor. So it happened, en route to rehearsal Thursday, that a Philadelphia Orchestra bus broke down but another was close behind. It pulled alongside the first with a lane in between so the musicians could exit one and board the other, while the drivers fended off aggressive motorists itching to claim that lane for themselves.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The white floor cover on the Verizon Hall stage suggested something left over from a painting crew. Instead, the special surface was for Philadanco in its Friday collaboration with the Philadelphia Orchestra - an artistically gratifying enterprise that showed how easily such organizations can come together in an identity-enhancing experience. The meeting point was Poulenc's 1929 Aubade, a Jazz Age ballet/piano concerto hybrid performed with choreography by Tommie-Waheed Evans that wasn't out to change the world but showed off the quintet of female dancers well and authenticated the music's content.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The New Yorkers struck, but the Philadelphians stuck. Stuck to their hometown fans, that is. Unable to perform at Wednesday night's Carnegie Hall season-opening gala after stagehands went on strike, the Philadelphia Orchestra responded with a bold Plan B, putting on an abbreviated concert back home in Verizon Hall. The doors of the Kimmel Center were thrown open Wednesday at 6 p.m. and, to a crowd of about 2,500, the orchestra played a no-intermission 90 minutes of Tchaikovsky, Mozart, and Ravel.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
A stagehand strike has forced the cancellation of Carnegie Hall's Wednesday night black-tie gala season-opener, at which the Philadelphia Orchestra was to have been the featured ensemble. The stagehands, represented by Local One of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, were working under a contract that expired Aug. 31, and called a strike at 8 a.m., according to a union statement. "Carnegie Hall sincerely regrets any inconvenience this strike will cause our artists, concertgoers, and everyone with whom we work," said Clive Gillinson, executive and artistic Director of Carnegie Hall.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In 1973, when the Philadelphia Orchestra made history in China, Inquirer music critic Daniel Webster was there. Now David Patrick Stearns reports on the 2013 visit, building on this long relationship. TIANJIN, China - "Wasn't that a mud field last year?" It was an idle observation made as the Philadelphia Orchestra's buses cruised along the scenic route to the Tianjin Performing Arts Center for a Wednesday evening concert, passing meticulously landscaped parks filled with beds of plump crimson tulips.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Developer Ken Goldenberg is hard to pin down. Like an object in perpetual motion, he pivots from one real estate project to another on any given day.   He has eight significant developments going on throughout the region, including high-rise student housing next to Temple University, luxury carriage homes behind Haverford College, and a mixed-use project in the Graduate Hospital area. But one project clearly has the head of the Blue Bell-based Goldenberg Group excited.
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