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Concert Hall

NEWS
November 11, 1990
In our Philadelphiacentric view of the world, cities like Newark, N.J., Detroit and Cleveland exist on Earth primarily for the purpose of enabling us to feel good about our city. And so it was with a certain amount of alarm that we read a story the other day about how Newark has hired an architect for a new $140 million concert hall in un-beautiful downtown Newark. After all, it seems like it was only a few months ago that we were writing about how Newark's bond rating was going up at roughly the same time that Philadelphia's was going down.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - Meryl Streep, the Takacs Quartet, and Philip Roth aren't names likely to be seen together, much less people found in the same concert hall. Yet Princeton University Concerts presented all three in Richardson Auditorium on Friday evening, with the quartet playing Arvo Pärt and Franz Schubert, Streep reading extensively from the 2006 novel Everyman , and its author, Roth, listening in the audience - in a one-time-only event that guaranteed a packed house. Interdisciplinary events are a priority for Princeton University Concerts, this one building on a similar Takacs program presented at Carnegie Hall in 2007, with Philip Seymour Hoffman reading Roth's accounts of how everyday people decline, die, are grieved and remembered.
NEWS
June 18, 2010
Ernest Fleischmann, 85, the imperious impresario who ran the Los Angeles Philharmonic for nearly three decades, helping to elevate its stature to that of an orchestra of the first rank, died Sunday in Los Angeles. Mr. Fleischmann became executive director of the Philharmonic in 1969, moving to Los Angeles from London, where he had been general manager of the London Symphony. His title changed in 1988 to executive vice president and managing director. He left in 1998. When he arrived, the conductor Zubin Mehta was presiding over an underpaid and undervalued collection of promising musicians playing in an undistinguished concert hall.
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
It's a good week for the city's struggling Avenue of the Arts. A key project, the proposed new orchestra concert hall has avoided a disastrous setback, and the University of the Arts, a major force on South Broad Street, has gotten a $22 million grant. The Sidney Kimmel Foundation, named for the Jones New York clothing magnate, yesterday announced it will extend the deadline on its September 1993 promise to give $12 million toward the construction of an orchestra concert hall.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
If the Philadelphia Orchestra is pushing two big rocks up a hill at once - trying to renovate the historic Academy of Music and build a new concert hall - it's at least managed to keep one from rolling back down. After meeting yesterday, the Pew Charitable Trusts has decided to renew its $7.5 million commitment to the renovation of the Academy, a gift the board decided to reconsider after billionaire Walter Annenberg recently grumbled about progress. Annenberg's $10 million grant and Pew's gift represent the bulk of money raised so far toward the $27 million renovation.
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Music Writer
The new concert hall promises to be a tourist attraction as much as a cultural landmark. Planned as an architectural marvel, the Regional Performing Arts Center will offer a state-of-the-art orchestra hall and recital theater. The 2,500 seats in the main concert hall and another 650 seats in the recital theater will join 2,900 seats at the Academy of Music, 1,600 at the Merriam and 300 at the Wilma. That's a whopping 8,000 seats in two blocks. The designers contacted more than 58 local performing organizations for input on the smaller space, finally deciding that it made more sense to have an adaptable 650-seat recital theater than an intermediate hall duplicating the Merriam's seating.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Media Borough taxpayers will not get a property tax increase in 1991, but they may get a rock-and-roll concert hall, which they vehemently oppose. That was the consensus among a packed audience at the Borough Council's Thursday night meeting, the last and longest and perhaps loudest of the year. The meeting began at 8 p.m. and ran for almost 3 1/2 hours. The council adopted a $3,099,236 general-fund budget calling for no change in the current 15-mill tax rate, the lowest in Delware County.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Orchestra announced yesterday that it had received a $3 million challenge grant from the William Penn Foundation, the first gift from a major Philadelphia foundation for the proposed $95 million concert hall. "It's a very significant sign," said Peter Wyeth, director of development for the orchestra. The foundation grant, he said, gave the concert-hall project "the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval. " According to a statement by Bernard C. Watson, president of the William Penn Foundation, the grant "reflects our belief that the concert hall project is an extremely important one for Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 6, 1991 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
A proposal to turn the now-closed Media Theater into a rock-and-roll concert hall has raised concerns that the owners actually plan to use the building for office space. Media Real Estate Co., owner of the theater, owns another Delaware County movie house that was converted for office use after a brief fling as a rock- and-roll hall. That was the College Theater along Chester Road in the Swarthmore section of Springfield Township, which closed as a movie house in 1987 and for a short period was leased to a rock concert promoter.
NEWS
September 8, 1996 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Stephan Salisbury contributed to this article
The Philadelphia Orchestra has decided it is unable to build a concert hall itself and will let someone else have a try. The orchestra's board has voted to turn the project over to a new, as yet unformed nonprofit corporation that would build, own and operate a new concert hall along with a new performing-arts center - perhaps as a single structure. It would also manage, though not own, the Academy of Music, the orchestra's present home. The board's decision marks a significant turning point in the orchestra's rocky path to a new home.
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