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NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In 1973, when the Philadelphia Orchestra made history in China, Inquirer music critic Daniel Webster was there. Now David Patrick Stearns reports on the 2013 visit, building on this long relationship. TIANJIN, China - "Wasn't that a mud field last year?" It was an idle observation made as the Philadelphia Orchestra's buses cruised along the scenic route to the Tianjin Performing Arts Center for a Wednesday evening concert, passing meticulously landscaped parks filled with beds of plump crimson tulips.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Developer Ken Goldenberg is hard to pin down. Like an object in perpetual motion, he pivots from one real estate project to another on any given day.   He has eight significant developments going on throughout the region, including high-rise student housing next to Temple University, luxury carriage homes behind Haverford College, and a mixed-use project in the Graduate Hospital area. But one project clearly has the head of the Blue Bell-based Goldenberg Group excited.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
When an orchestra plays live to film, as the Philadelphia Orchestra increasingly does, you might find yourself consciously sorting out the essence of the experience. Are you in a movie house or a concert hall? In West Side Story , with the orchestra playing beneath a large-screen showing of the 1961 film, Philadelphians Friday night easily out-rumbled the balletic thugs from the Sharks and Jets. But when the audience applauded at the end of songs, were they showering Natalie Wood with praise, or the orchestra's alternately luscious and trenchant handling of Leonard Bernstein's score?
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin and INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Toting Mickey Mouse dolls and donning Lilly Pulitzer shifts, the city's youngest classical-music fans made for a gorgeous spectacle Saturday morning filing into the Academy of Music. Yes, the Philadelphia Orchestra's family concert was returning just this once to the Academy, which the ensemble largely left behind in 2001 for more acoustically advanced environs down the block. The Academy is "still a little bit our home," the orchestra's next music director, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, told the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2012 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, gensleh@phillynews.com
Rob Morsberger is one of the best rock/pop singer/songwriters you've never heard on recordings or seen in concert. There is still time to make amends, but urgency is suggested, as the guy is "living with an illness that could rapidly derail me at any time," he acknowledges with admirable nonchalance. This weekend, Morsberger performs two shows in the area — Friday night at Kennett Flash in Kennett Square and Saturday at Psalm Salon in Overbrook Hills, where talent booker Jamey Reilly calls him "an artist we love.
NEWS
January 25, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The drumroll that greeted the announcement Wednesday of Yannick Nézet-Séguin's first full Philadelphia Orchestra concert season came with surprises that perhaps even music pundits didn't see coming. With highlights including an Oct. 18 season opener with opera star Renée Fleming; the Verdi Requiem with Marina Poplavskaya and Rolando Villazón; a fully staged The Rite of Spring in collaboration with the Philadelphia Live Arts Festival; and Bach's great and infrequently heard St. Matthew Passion , the 36-year-old incoming music director also let it drop (in an interview that took place before the announcement)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Can you have a Neighborhood Concert in something that's not actually a neighborhood? Such was the question when the Philadelphia Orchestra made its debut Tuesday at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, that burgeoning corporate hinterland between South Philadelphia and the airport. The concert hall was Building 543, a huge, warehouselike structure where ship parts once were made and that now is part of Urban Outfitters' ever-expanding headquarters. Outside the window, the rusting aircraft carrier USS Forrestal loomed.
NEWS
September 11, 2011
Even with the classical music world on pins and needles over the future of the Philadelphia Orchestra, the fall season hardly looks grim. Not only does the orchestra have a strong podium lineup - including chief conductor Charles Dutoit, music director designate Yannick Nézet-Séguin, and popular guest Vladimir Jurowski - but other organizations in town keep pushing forward with enterprising programs that are getting them out of the usual venues....
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Andrea Clearfield's Center City living room is part Swiss chalet, part Craftsman-style attic, an impossible cone-shaped space held up with dark timber beams and accented with a Mercer tile fireplace. It's nothing for the successful composer to invite a hundred or so strangers up to her third-floor lair to listen to musicians perform, from willowy pianists fresh from Carnegie Hall to grizzled folkies singing boxcar blues. All she asks is that guests remove their shoes before plopping down on her beige carpet.
NEWS
February 9, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene C. Fish, 101, a tax attorney, civic activist, and philanthropist who helped spearhead the campaign to build the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, died Saturday, Feb. 5, at Rydal Park Retirement Community. In 1998, Mr. Fish and other major donors attended a breakfast where they were shown a scale model of a proposed regional performing arts center and new home for the Philadelphia Orchestra. The model, with a cello-shaped concert hall, a smaller recital hall, and restaurants beneath a glass roof, had Mr. Fish's enthusiastic approval.
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