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Concessions

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NEWS
September 15, 2011 | BY DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
THE JOBS OF 27 assistant principals on the chopping block were spared last night after members of the Philadelphia School District's principals' union voted to make concessions on their contract. With a 173-64 vote, members of the Commonwealth Association of School Administrators conceded to many of the same givebacks they turned down just a few weeks ago, including delaying a 3 percent raise. Although district officials rescinded the layoffs of those administrators, union president Robert McGrogan said members remain critical of the district.
NEWS
June 19, 1992 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Rocco Miele, a master tailor who owned shops and concessions in Philadelphia and South Jersey, died Wednesday. He was 58 and lived in Northeast Philadelphia. For the last several years, Miele had the tailoring concession at Joseph A. Bank Clothiers in Center City. Previously, Miele's Tailoring had been connected with B.J. Keats and Stanley Blacker Inc. Orphaned at age 7, Miele grew up in foster homes, orphanages and with relatives. At age 16, he became a tailor's apprentice with Al Colangelo.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the clock ticking toward either an agreement or layoffs, leaders of the Philadelphia School District's blue-collar workers' union said Wednesday that they have offered $20 million in concessions but so far have been rebuffed. Members of 32BJ, the union that represents mechanics, bus attendants, cleaners, and other workers, plan to pack City Council chambers on Thursday, pressuring officials to keep their promise to hold up the district's funding until a deal is cut with 32BJ.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1993 | By David Johnston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A major Chilean-fruit shipper is moving its business from Philadelphia to Wilmington - the second such departure from here in a year. The exit of Seagate Corp., which is owned by a combination of Chilean and American interests, is putting added pressure on the local longshoremen's union to grant new concessions to stem the loss of work. Officials for Seagate Corp. did not return phone calls yesterday, but John LaRue, executive director of the Philadelphia Regional Port Authority, said the company, which had been working out of Piers 82/84, will operate out of Wilmington next season.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1993 | By David Johnston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like a grape in the June sun, the flow of fruit from Chile is shriveling, which means the time is ripe for the fruit industry and Philadelphia port executives to again try pruning the wages and benefits paid to longshoremen. The unprecedented concessions that International Longshoremen's Association members approved for the 1992-93 winter fruit season expire on Sept. 30. Now, the ILAs are being asked not only to renew that agreement, but to make additional concessions, especially easing work rules to lower the cost of handling fruit and other cargo after it is off the ships.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2002 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To cut costs and keep it out of Bankruptcy Court, US Airways Group Inc. asked its unions yesterday to agree to $950 million worth of concessions a year for seven years. The airline also said it would ask suppliers to support cost breaks of $200 million annually. Meanwhile, to increase revenue, the cash-strapped airline said it intended to sell some of its wide-body planes, used for long-distance flights. It also wants to add as many as 260 small regional jets so it can serve more small and midsize cities.
NEWS
April 12, 2009 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's been a nasty, hateful and, at times, personal fight, one that seemed destined to go on forever. But last week, momentum swung sharply toward those striving to build a controversial museum on private land inside Valley Forge National Historical Park. Key tactical concessions and legal victories, building upon favorable government votes, have moved the American Revolution Center closer to being constructed at the Lower Providence site where its supporters want it to go. "When you get a court order in your favor, the momentum shifts," said Paul Decker, head of the Valley Forge Convention and Visitors Bureau and a studied observer of the drama.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1994 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's Aramark will be dishing up hot dogs and soda to fans at Shea Stadium, the Meadowlands and Churchill Downs with its purchase of Harry M. Stevens, announced yesterday. Stevens, which Aramark says is the oldest concessions business in the United States, also counts the Miami Arena, Houston Astrodome and Long Island's Nassau Coliseum among the 20 accounts it will add to the 100 already in Aramark's leisure-services portfolio. Aramark, which is privately held, did not disclose how much it paid, nor how much Stevens would add to its $5 billion in annual revenues.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1994 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Aramark, the food-service provider formerly known as ARA Services Inc., said yesterday that it had acquired Harry M. Stevens Inc., which operates food and drink concessions at some of the nation's biggest arenas and ballparks. With the newly acquired contracts, Aramark, which has operated stadium concessions around the country since 1966, will now provide service at the homes of 28 teams in baseball, football, basketball and hockey. Aramark officials would not disclose the price of the deal, which gives the Center City-based company rights to venues in nine states and Puerto Rico.
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BUSINESS
January 21, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
On the day the case was scheduled for trial in a federal courtroom in New York, Major League Baseball settled a class-action antitrust lawsuit claiming that baseball's longtime practice of carving the nation into media markets for TV broadcasts was anti-competitive and hurt fans. Tuesday's settlement left intact Major League Baseball's exclusive geographical territories for TV broadcasts and online streaming - Philadelphia remains a Phillies TV market - but the league agreed to concessions estimated to be worth tens of millions of dollars to consumers over time in lower prices for baseball packages.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA managers and other nonunion employees will be required to pay more toward their pensions, and managers hired in the future will be offered smaller pensions, under a plan expected to be approved Thursday by the SEPTA board. About 1,800 supervisory, administrative, and management employees will be affected by the changes, designed to improve the "long-term financial stability" of the transit agency's pension plan, SEPTA officials said Wednesday. The move is the latest by a public employer to reduce pension costs and shift more of the expense to employees and away from taxpayers.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A bid in bankruptcy court to set aside a labor contract for 1,136 employees at Atlantic City's Trump Taj Mahal casino has set up a pitched battle between Unite Here Local 54 and Carl Icahn. Icahn, a billionaire investor known for taking control of financially distressed businesses by buying debt at a discount, controls the fate of Trump Entertainment Resorts because he owns $286 million in first-lien debt and stands first in line to be paid in any bankruptcy deal. As a condition of keeping Trump Taj Mahal open, Icahn wants massive concessions from labor and government.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THERE WAS the famous Neil Diamond story. Family legend had it that the singer-songwriter showed up at the concession stand at the Spectrum one day and, without introducing himself, told Madeline Forte, who ran the stand, that Neil Diamond was soon to perform. "I wouldn't pay any money to see him," she snorted. A humbled but still anonymous Neil Diamond skulked away. But that Saturday at his concert, he told the story about his run-in with the "hotdog lady. " He had arranged with management to have her brought up to the stands and put a spotlight on her. He provided free tickets for her and her family for his next show, which they attended.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | By Martha Woodall and Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writers
With less than 48 hours until the funding deadline set by Philadelphia's schools chief, the School Reform Commission has called a meeting Thursday to consider actions he says will give him more flexibility to run schools whenever they open. Word of the special session came amid signals from city, state, and school officials that they were still working to meet what a Corbett administration aide called Friday's "doable" deadline and open the schools Sept. 9, but they weren't there yet. Because the district is still facing a deficit of more than $270 million and reeling from massive layoffs, Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said he would ask the SRC to suspend parts of the state school code dealing with seniority so that employees who are recalled can return to the schools where they worked in June.
NEWS
August 15, 2013 | By Troy Graham and Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gov. Corbett emphatically rejected on Tuesday a request to release $45 million in state funds, the latest twist in the ongoing battle to resolve the Philadelphia School District's financial crisis. Corbett's budget secretary, Charles Zogby, said the money would not be available until the teachers' union signs a contract that includes substantial "fiscal savings and academic reforms. " "The law is clear," Corbett reiterated during an appearance in Chester. "Until that takes place, there can be no release of funds.
NEWS
August 14, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
WITH A LOCAL solution to the school district's funding crisis proving elusive, city leaders are calling on Gov. Corbett's administration to release a $45 million grant that could allow schools to open on time next month. Some Harrisburg Republicans, however, say the release of the grant is contingent on the teachers' union agreeing to concessions, which - if it happens at all - would not take place until later this month. Superintendent William Hite said last week the district needs $50 million by Friday or schools may not open Sept.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Martha Woodall and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
The $140 million package Gov. Corbett presented Sunday to rescue Philadelphia's cash-strapped public schools has tentative written all over it. The legislature has not yet signed off on key items. The federal piece depends, for now, on what one negotiator called "a handshake on the phone. " And some of the numbers are hopeful projections. But this much is clear: An unusual array of political and business leaders helped craft the latest version of a rescue plan. If all the pieces Corbett described to The Inquirer in a Sunday interview fall into place - and the district is able to win as much as $133 million in labor concessions - the plan would provide nearly $274 million of the $304 million that Philadelphia School Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. and the School Reform Commission said they need to avert a doomsday scenario.
NEWS
January 13, 2013 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia School District principals were promised a raise on Jan. 1, but the cash-strapped district now says it's not paying. In September 2011, the local chapter of the Commonwealth Association of School Administrators agreed to defer for a year the 3 percent pay hike its members were owed. The principals agreed to the concession, union chief Robert McGrogan said at the time, because they understood how bad the district's finances were. The raise was supposed to show up in next week's paychecks.
SPORTS
December 31, 2012 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NHL and the players' union appear to be getting closer to an agreement that would salvage a 48-game season. If they don't settle, the league will suffer irreparable harm and it might take years for hockey to be considered a major sport again. That's why the NHL made some concessions the other day, trying to save a partial season and stop the waves of apathy fans are riding. For months, the league and the players' union have outsmarted themselves, playing a game of chicken and waiting for the other side to cave in. But now, with a league-created Jan. 11 deadline almost here, the sides must get serious.
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