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NEWS
August 21, 1986
As a relatively new resident of Philadelphia, I may have fresh impressions to offer on an area of weakness that ought to be an area of strength. The underground concourse in Center City could be practical, lively and attractive. Instead it is awkward to use, dreary and ugly. My suggestions: The concourse needs maps to guide visitors and natives to the Gallery, South Broad, etc. The only map I have seen is on one of the subway platforms. The concourse should have more visible security.
NEWS
November 15, 1993 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
For a week, ominous rumors swirled among advocates for the homeless: The city would hire a private security force to drive the homeless from Center City subway concourses, sweeping them not into shelters, but into the cold night. It turned out differently. The city's clearing of the subway encampment late Saturday night was accomplished virtually without confrontation, as practically all the homeless left voluntarily. "They did it in a nice way," said a man who identified himself as "Uptown," one of a handful of homeless still in the concourse at 11 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | By Thomas Ferrick Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer Dan Meyers contributed to this article
Police and city workers yesterday dismantled the cardboard shanties and makeshift beds set up in recent weeks by the homeless in the Broad Street Subway concourse near Spruce Street. The operation began at 8:30 a.m. when police knocked on the front of Terry Ryan's box and told him and an estimated three dozen others to leave. Within two hours, crews had removed the boxes, cleared the area and were hosing down the concrete floor with water. "We left when we were asked," said Ryan, 19. "We didn't come down here to start a riot.
NEWS
December 4, 1987 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Center City's underground concourse should be developed with shops and restaurants below the intersection of Broad and Chestnut Streets and maintained by an independent authority, according to a consultant's study released yesterday by the City Planning Commission. The study concluded that the concourse - a vast expanse for pedestrians from Eighth to 17th Streets under Market Street and John F. Kennedy Boulevard and from Race to Spruce Streets under Broad Street - "is potentially the finest in the country," connecting transit lines below ground with streets above.
NEWS
June 21, 1989 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 30 youths attacked and robbed a man in the subway concourse at 15th and Market Streets yesterday afternoon and then were chased out by police officers, who made six arrests, authorities said. Nathan Butcher, 19, of the city's West Oak Lane section, was walking through the concourse about 12:30 p.m. when he saw the youths, ranging in age from about 13 to about 18, running toward him and shouting, according to police Detective Joseph Sweeney. One youth ripped two gold chains from Butcher's neck.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An argument between two homeless men erupted into gunfire in a Center City subway concourse last night, leaving one critically wounded, authorities said. An estimated 30 homeless people were settling down for the night about 9 p.m. in their encampment on the eastbound side of the station at 13th and Market Streets when a shot rang out. A man identified by police and witnesses as Wendell "Chuckie" Ellerbe, 31, clutched his stomach. "First he stood there like he couldn't believe what happened," said another homeless man, Leo Fennello, 61. "Then he kind of grabbed his stomach and said, 'Somebody help me!
NEWS
July 29, 2000 | By John Corr and Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Can you get there from here? Some of the red, white and blue cardboard signs that have sprouted along the underground SEPTA concourse around City Hall directing riders to the "Pa. Convention Center" seem to be pointing in the wrong direction. Take a sign in the concourse near Locust Street pointing south. The Convention Center is actually north and east of there. SEPTA has an explanation: "The signs are designed specifically with out-of-towners in mind," SEPTA spokesman Richard Maloney said.
NEWS
January 7, 2011 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ben Davis usually would pick up his wife from her hair appointment in Center City and ride home with her on the train "for her safety," said Ren'ee DeSanto, a stylist at Salon Hair Express. On Thursday morning, while waiting for his wife's hair to be done, Davis was attacked and robbed in a men's room just steps from the salon, in the old Lit Bros. building. "I was in the middle of doing her hair," DeSanto said. "He came stumbling around here, bleeding profusely from his head. " Davis' wife, Sandra, thought he had been punched.
NEWS
October 17, 2008 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia man charged with killing a rival crack cocaine dealer catering to the homeless people who stay overnight in the Suburban Station concourse was found guilty of first-degree murder yesterday. The Common Pleas Court jury deliberated about four hours before returning the verdict against Bryant "Heavy" Brown. Brown, 30, said nothing as Judge Shelley Robins New immediately sentenced him to life in prison without parole - the sentence required by Pennsylvania law for first-degree murder where the death penalty is not possible.
NEWS
March 1, 1989
From City Hall to Locust Street, the subway concourse is clean, if unrelievedly bleak. But just south of Locust, a pedestrian is hit by the gagging scent of urine. This is the turf - between Locust and Spruce - that Philadelphia has ceded to the box people. Late last year they were evicted, their presence something of an embarrassment when juxtaposed on the television news with that of bejeweled, above-ground concert-goers. But they are back. This time with a vengeance. The Inquirer's Thomas Ferrick Jr. spent a week reporting on them, turning up stories of rampant drug abuse, heavy drinking, frequent sex, partying, brawling, anxiety.
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NEWS
July 17, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
THE MULTITIERED granite steps from the concourse of the Municipal Services Building provide more than just an egress from SEPTA's underground rail line to the Center City streets above. The steps, or rather the cavernous space beneath them, offer refuge from the rain for Philadelphia's homeless. "This is the only dry place we can go in Center City," George Creamer said yesterday after yet another soaker left puddles near his cardboard sleeping mat. "Trust me, I'd rather sleep out underneath the stars, but on nights like tonight, when it's going to rain, there is going to be 20 people down here.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two hours behind schedule, Beth Heinly finally located a working electrical outlet in the echoing cavern of the Broad Street concourse and settled in, wearing a puffy chef's hat, to cook pasta. The mac-and-cheese giveaway was Heinly's take on site-specific performance art - meant to engage a space that mostly lies vacant, except for occasional skateboarders, scuttling rainy-day commuters, and covert smokers of marijuana. "I wanted to do a really loving thing in a scary place," she said.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
One of the most heavily traveled pavements in Philadelphia runs not along any street, but through the busy Gallery shopping center. Its basement-level concourse stretches more than three blocks, from Jefferson Station (formerly Market East) to the subway lines that converge beneath the old Strawbridge's building. Each workday, thousands of commuters, shoppers, and others surge through this convenient all-weather thoroughfare, which also provides vital access for the disabled. But with the Gallery, one of the nation's oldest urban malls, soon to undergo a major overhaul, those Philadelphians in their thousands face the prospect that this long-standing right-of-way will be blocked for as long as a year or more.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
BY NOW, the Hub of Hope, Project HOME's seasonal social-service center for the homeless in Suburban Station, should be buzzing with men and women wanting to see a case worker or a doctor or just get a short reprieve from the cold with a tepid cup of coffee or a pair of socks. But in a cruel irony, the Hub of Hope is homeless. In November, the landlord who had donated the space for the past three winters sent word that he would no longer be able to "due to complaints from tenants and brokers.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 11 workers who clean the gritty subway concourses under Center City fear that they will lose their jobs when SEPTA takes control of the miles of concourses from the city on July 1. The workers, who do the dirty work of cleaning up after nighttime revelers and homeless people before the morning rush of commuters, work for a janitorial company that is a subcontractor for the Center City District. Under a contract approved last month, the city - owner of the concourses - and the CCD will relinquish responsibility for cleaning, maintenance, and repairs to SEPTA.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA will spend about 3 percent more for transit operations in the fiscal year that begins July 1, and it will nearly double its spending on major construction and repair projects, thanks to an infusion of state money. The SEPTA board unanimously approved a $1.33 billion operating budget and a $572 million capital budget Thursday, without discussion. The operating budget, which includes no fare increases, provides money for a pilot program to resume 24-hour-a-day subway service on weekends, beginning this summer.
NEWS
May 17, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ending decades of divided control of the subterranean realm beneath Center City, SEPTA soon will be in charge of cleaning, maintaining, and repairing almost everything under the streets. That should mean improved cleanliness, lighting, and safety as SEPTA uses new state funding to upgrade the long-neglected passageways, agency officials said Thursday. A new 30-year lease with the city gives SEPTA responsibility for the 3.5 miles of city-owned concourses along Market Street from Eighth to 18th Streets and south to the Walnut-Locust subway station, as well as the elevators and escalators that serve the Broad Street and Market-Frankford Lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The downtown shopping mall is another of those bright ideas from the urban-renewal era that didn't turn out so well. Take Philadelphia's own Gallery at Market East. When it opened 37 years ago, it was hailed as a miracle cure for that fading shopping street. Today, poor East Market Street is holding on by its fingernails, and it's the Gallery that now needs reviving. Maybe that explains the excitement over last week's news that a high-end clothing discounter out of New York was setting up shop in the old Strawbridge & Clothier.
SPORTS
June 11, 2013 | BY JOHN MURROW, Daily News Staff Writer murrowj@phillynews.com
CHANGE IS COMING to Lincoln Financial Field beginning this fall. A 2-year project, which will cost an estimated $125 million, will add high-definition video boards, upgrade club and suite boxes, create numerous entry points for fans and additional seating and celebrate the team's history with art throughout both levels of the stadium. Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie said the upgrades are a direct result of feedback from the fans and will improve the overall experience while at the stadium.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
RAFIQ SMITH was a neighborhood nuisance with a long criminal history, arrested for everything from loitering and shoplifting to robbery and even rape. In most cases, he got off, as frustrated prosecutors often withdrew charges when witnesses failed to show up in court. On Tuesday, he beat another case, walking free from a city jail after a robbery victim - a man Smith allegedly ordered to strip at simulated gunpoint at Broad and Locust before stealing his clothes, cash and cellphone - failed to come to court, too. Smith apparently followed his release with another crime: He robbed and raped a woman in an underground city concourse on Wednesday night, police said.
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