CollectionsConductor
IN THE NEWS

Conductor

NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Beethoven and Falla. Only one conductor would dare to pair such radically dissimilar composers with the Philadelphia Orchestra: the late Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos. Planned by him before his death last year, the program on Thursday fell to the orchestra's conductor in residence, Cristian Macelaru. He is as strong-minded as anyone standing before the orchestra this season and, overall, made the evening work in a manner hugely different from Frühbeck de Burgos'. Beethoven was represented by his least severe orchestral work, the Symphony No. 6 ("Pastoral")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Has Ligeti's Atmosphères lost some of its shock value in the decades since its use in 2001: A Space Odyssey ? Maybe not. Amid our current orchestral odyssey of making programs as obsequious as possible, the classic from 1961 is regaining ground as a stroke of wondrous impertinence. British conductor Robin Ticciati made it so Friday night, even while constructing a Philadelphia Orchestra program in Verizon Hall of sly interplay among pieces. Another conductor might have aped the film, pairing it with Also sprach Zarathustra . Ticciati instead connected this Ligeti with an antecedent: Wagner.
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Though the Philadelphia Orchestra has a steep climb ahead in its largest-ever fund-raising campaign effort, several key pieces helping to smooth the path are falling into place. The Philadelphia Orchestra Association has secured the stability of its artistic, administrative, and board leadership - an important checkoff on the list of many foundations and philanthropists. Board chairman Richard B. Worley will stay on another three years, as will president Allison B. Vulgamore. And the orchestra and music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin have committed to another five years together.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* MOZART IN THE JUNGLE. Amazon Prime, today.   COMPLETE this sentence: Change is [BLANK]. How any of us answers likely has a lot to with whether we're driving the steamroller or lying under it, but "inevitable" is a one-size-fits-most reply. Which is why the classical-music dramedy "Mozart in the Jungle," the newest original series from Amazon Studios, doesn't require a degree in music or orchestra season tickets to appreciate. Developed by cousins and entertainment royalty Roman Coppola and Jason Schwartzman, with writer-director Alex Timbers, and loosely based on a memoir by musician-turned-journalist Blair Tindall, "Mozart in the Jungle" is set in the apparently cutthroat world of classical music.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
As a crucible, the act of guest conductor meeting orchestra may be uniquely tricky. The conductor's path to self-actualization lies rather deceptively in coaxing the ensemble to become the highest form of itself. It's not a spiritual exercise but a practical one when an ensemble's identity is as strong as the Philadelphia Orchestra's, which is why Susanna Mälkki's debut with the Philadelphians on Friday afternoon was remarkable. She seamlessly handed off woodwind timbres into strings in Respighi's Botticelli Triptych . If Brahms' Symphony No. 4 's first movement seemed curiously bloodless in its stepped-down tempo, she revealed good reasons.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
PRINCETON - The boy-wonder conductor is about to turn 70. Yes, compulsively youthful Michael Tilson Thomas is now an elder statesman, though still very much a musician who has fascinated and challenged the music world while maintaining a constant evolution that makes his work ever more fully realized. Still, his current East Coast sweep with his San Francisco Symphony Orchestra wasn't immune to the vagaries of touring on Tuesday at the McCarter Theater, where it warmed up for Carnegie Hall with a performance of Mahler's Symphony No. 7 . The five-movement piece itself is exactly the sort of dark, unconventional work - perhaps the least-loved of the composer's output - that Tilson Thomas handily sells to a larger public.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The fashion world has long popularized clothes that appear to be turned inside out. Why shouldn't the Philadelphia Orchestra do its own version of that every so often? How could that work? Dvorák's Symphony No. 8 was so significantly reimagined by guest conductor Jakub Hruša that you'd think the prevailing, mellifluous tradition of Wolfgang Sawallisch never existed. The music was a rougher ride but full of incident. Orchestral sonorities that are normally string-dominated shared the sound picture more equally with brass and winds.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Daniel Webster, For The Inquirer
Unless he had monitored his audience's vital signs just before the end of Mahler's Symphony No. 2 , Philadelphia Orchestra conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin could hardly have predicted the emotional fever that greeted the final ecstatic chords at the Kimmel Center on Thursday. The sense of release at the end of 90 minutes of Mahler's incremental structuring almost guarantees a momentous response, but this performance made its effect on emotional terms as well as on orchestral virtuosity.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Fresh from appearing with the fabled Vienna State Opera, Yannick Nézet-Séguin was at the epicenter recently when shockwaves rippled through the cultural world, as that company's chief conductor, Franz Welser-Möst, abruptly walked out with minimum explanation. "Surreal" and "very quiet" was Nézet-Séguin's report from the belly of the beast. But after his successful debut in the Austrian capital conducting The Flying Dutchman , should Philadelphians worry that Vienna is prowling after the Philadelphia Orchestra's popular and still-newish music director, as the Metropolitan Opera has long been rumored to be doing?
NEWS
August 3, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a yellow hat and golf cart emblazoned with his nickname, John "Gig" Gigliotti has perhaps become as iconic on the Wildwood Boardwalk as the yellow tram cars he oversees. A former Conrail train conductor, the 85-year-old West Deptford resident returns to his North Wildwood home each summer, and to his job supervising eight 5-m.p.h. electric trains that transport boardwalk goers along the two-mile stretch. The service has been a staple since 1949. It's frequent that workers at the eateries and stands along the boardwalk call out "Giggy" as he drives up and down the planks during 16-hour days, seven days a week, April through September.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|