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Confidentiality

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NEWS
September 29, 1988 | By Howard Goodman, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a surprise reversal, plans for genetic blood testing of a Florida 9- year-old were called off yesterday after an attorney for the girl's father demanded strict confidentiality. The new demands came after the blood tests had appeared to be set for Monday, and were startling news to a Bucks County couple hoping to learn whether the girl is their daughter - raised by others after a baby-swap they allege occurred at the Florida hospital where she was born. LaVonna L. Vice, an attorney for Ernest and Regina Twigg, the Langhorne couple, said that Dale Swope, a Tampa attorney for the girl's father, insisted yesterday that the Twiggs not reveal the results of the genetic testing to anyone, not even their children.
NEWS
November 20, 1990 | By Robert Zausner, Jodi Enda and Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The House and Senate yesterday passed a measure aimed at protecting the confidentiality of people who are tested for the AIDS virus, while also providing some protection for doctors and others who treat patients who may be infected. Rep. Babette Josephs (D., Phila.), who helped move the bill through the legislature, said she believed it would encourage more people to be tested for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). "The purpose is to make it safer for people to come forward and be tested because their confidentiality will be guaranteed," she said.
NEWS
April 30, 1993 | By Lisa L. Colangelo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In December, Morrisville school board member Paul Bunting made what he thought was a simple request. He asked the district to review the classroom use of a book on the life of Malcolm X and consider removing it because of "derogatory" remarks about white and Jewish people. But when the request was made public, Bunting found himself in the center of what he later termed "a media circus. " He wants to make sure that never happens again. On Wednesday night, the board approved a policy that guarantees confidentiality to people or organizations requesting such reviews.
NEWS
April 24, 2003 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The school board is considering a draft recommendation of proposed changes to its closed-to-the-public committee system and other procedural matters. The draft, prepared by Board Solicitor Reese A. Davis, was discussed at an executive session before Tuesday night's public board meeting. Chase F. Gibson, the board's president, said the recommended changes likely would be given a first reading at the May 13 meeting. Gibson would not elaborate on the proposed changes, but he said last month that the board would review confidentiality issues and "the recently questioned, but never actually legally challenged, liaison committees of the board.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peter A. Ubel, a University of Pennsylvania Medical Center doctor and teacher, has ridden the elevator into history. Ubel has conducted the world's only study of what doctors and nurses say while riding up and down. His conclusion: Way, way too much. On Friday, while riding in an elevator for two hours, he discussed his pioneering research. "I admit, lives and deaths aren't decided by conversations in elevators," he said. "But people need to know they can trust the doctor.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Arthur Caplan and Dominic Sisti
We now know that James Holmes, who was charged this week in the Colorado movie theater shooting, had been seeing a psychiatrist, though no one besides his doctor knows how often he was seen or what he said during treatment. According to one report, the psychiatrist warned University of Colorado officials about Holmes, but no further action was taken because he dropped out of graduate school. This raises important legal and ethical questions about what doctors and others providing mental health care ought to do if they believe a patient is dangerous.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
When city officials pulled the trigger in 2012 by posting details on gun-permit appeals online, they considered it a public service. Now the data have become a $1.4 million public expense. The Nutter administration said Tuesday it had settled a class-action lawsuit with 3,265 Philadelphians who were denied a license to carry firearms by the Police Department or had a permit revoked and then appealed to the Department of Licenses and Inspections, which posted the information online. The postings - on a new interactive website - came as a result of L&I's effort to be more transparent following an executive order on open data signed by Mayor Nutter in April 2012.
NEWS
September 22, 1986 | By James M. Marsh
One of the most important provisions of the 1968 Pennsylvania Constitution is the article mandating the establishment of a Judicial Inquiry and Review Board, empowered to hear complaints against judges and justices of the peace and, in appropriate cases, to recommend the imposition of discipline by the Supreme Court. The constitution also provides that all proceedings before the board shall be confidential unless and until the board recommends discipline and files the record with the Supreme Court.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | By MARK McDONALD, Daily News Staff Writer
First, William G. Stead jumped off the SEPTA train after just five weeks on the job. Now, the Atlanta headhunter firm hired to find candidates to replace Stead as general manager has quit, and the SEPTA board isn't sure what impact it will have on the two-month-old search for a new boss at the troubled transit authority. Charles J. Chalk, president of MSL International, said in a letter to SEPTA board chairman J. Clayton Undercofler III that a breach of confidentiality that occurred when the names of eight candidates were made public has damaged his company's reputation and made further work impossible.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
A three-member panel of the Disciplinary Board of the state Supreme Court is scheduled to hear oral arguments Monday in a case that Supreme Court Justice Rolf R. Larsen initiated four years ago against a West Chester lawyer. Hanging in the balance is the professional fate of lawyer Robert B. Surrick, who has been a staunch critic of both Larsen and the judicial system, which Surrick says has been lax in holding judges accountable. The hearing comes just eight days before the Nov. 3 election, in which Larsen is seeking to win a second 10-year term on the state's highest court.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is perhaps no surprise to learn that matinee idol Tab Hunter, the clean-cut, clean-living boy-next-door who drove young female fans into fits of ecstasy, was a fabrication created by the Hollywood image machine. No such man existed. Or could exist, as we learn from Tab Hunter Confidential , an engaging, if uneven, new film from the remarkably prolific documentarian Jeffrey Schwarz ( I am Divine , Vito , Spine Tingler! The William Castle Story ). Tab Hunter was the real-life fictional role foisted on a young, shy, gay New Yorker named Andrew Kelm.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrea Constand, the former Temple University employee who lodged sexual-assault allegations against Bill Cosby in a 2005 lawsuit, now says she wants to publicly tell her story. In court filings Wednesday, Constand asked a federal judge in Philadelphia to void a confidentiality agreement in her settlement deal with the actor-comedian, saying he and his representatives had repeatedly violated its terms and had left her little recourse but to respond. She also asked for the release of a full transcript of a deposition Cosby gave in the case.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
When city officials pulled the trigger in 2012 by posting details on gun-permit appeals online, they considered it a public service. Now the data have become a $1.4 million public expense. The Nutter administration said Tuesday it had settled a class-action lawsuit with 3,265 Philadelphians who were denied a license to carry firearms by the Police Department or had a permit revoked and then appealed to the Department of Licenses and Inspections, which posted the information online. The postings - on a new interactive website - came as a result of L&I's effort to be more transparent following an executive order on open data signed by Mayor Nutter in April 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* PARROT CONFIDENTIAL. 8 tonight, WHYY12. * GROUND FLOOR. 10 and 10:35 p.m. tomorrow, TBS.   POLLY, it seems, wants much more than a cracker. That's the takeaway from "Parrot Confidential," tonight's installment of PBS' "Nature," which makes a compelling case against breeding parrots for pets while offering fascinating glimpses of what it's like to live with highly intelligent creatures whose care can represent more than a lifetime's commitment. I'm no sucker for nature documentaries - I probably couldn't pick a wildebeest out of a lineup - but who doesn't love a talking bird?
NEWS
July 4, 2013
Mayor Nutter's newest excuse for suppressing public information related to the fatal Market Street building collapse is that a grand jury is investigating the disaster. But the investigation doesn't change the public nature of the records involved. Experts in the field say they were public records before the collapse - and they're public records now. Nutter is blowing a chance to keep his word that his government would be transparent. State law even allows him to grant access to records that fall into a gray area if they illuminate public policy.
NEWS
November 19, 2012 | By John P. Martin and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
A Philadelphia nonprofit with ties to State Rep. Dwight Evans mismanaged $1.5 million in state grants since 2006, raising questions about how the money was obtained and spent, according to a confidential state audit. At Evans' direction, the Urban Affairs Coalition put a Philadelphia pastor and his aide on its payroll, the auditors found, then used taxpayer funds to pay them $365,000 for work that auditors said they could not verify. The grants included $1 million that went to renovate a nursing home run by Leland Beloff, a former Philadelphia city councilman who was convicted in an extortion scheme in 1987 with mob boss Nicodemo Scarfo.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Arthur Caplan and Dominic Sisti
We now know that James Holmes, who was charged this week in the Colorado movie theater shooting, had been seeing a psychiatrist, though no one besides his doctor knows how often he was seen or what he said during treatment. According to one report, the psychiatrist warned University of Colorado officials about Holmes, but no further action was taken because he dropped out of graduate school. This raises important legal and ethical questions about what doctors and others providing mental health care ought to do if they believe a patient is dangerous.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2012 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Human Genome Sciences Inc. filed a plan with regulators Thursday to try to block GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.'s $2.6 billion takeover offer for the Maryland-based pharmaceutical company. The shareholder-rights plan — a corporate tactic often called a poison pill because it discourages takeover attempts — was part of several filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. It would allow current shareholders to buy stock at a discounted price if anyone acquired more than 15 percent of the stock.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Pennsylvania's new natural gas law, which takes effect Saturday, was being debated, the focus was on high-profile issues such as the new impact fee. But just before it passed, medical provisions were added that now have some physicians worried it will compromise public health. Except in an emergency, a physician who needs proprietary information about chemicals used in natural gas drilling to assess a patient must provide "a written statement" to a company, according to the act, and must sign a confidentiality agreement.
SPORTS
March 5, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
THE PLAYERS' association believes the leak of NL MVP Ryan Braun's drug test was an isolated occurrence. ESPN reported in December that Braun tested positive for elevated testosterone. Representatives of the Milwaukee outfielder argued during a grievance hearing that specified procedures for handling the sample were not followed, and arbitrator Shyam Das last month overturned the 50-game suspension Braun faced. "Everybody associated with the case is extremely disappointed that it leaked out," union head Michael Weiner said yesterday at the Brewers' training camp.
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