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Confidentiality

NEWS
February 29, 1992 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The privacy of 200 million Americans with records at the Social Security Administration is threatened by an illegal trade in pilfered computer files, administration officials said yesterday. "Computerization has dramatically improved our ability to serve the public," Louis Enoff, Social Security deputy commissioner, told the Senate Finance subcommittee on Social Security. "However, it has also made confidentiality more difficult. " In one case of alleged data theft, two executives of Nationwide Electronic Tracking (NET)
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | By Cindy Anders, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The West Co. has dropped its lawsuit against one of its top executives, but is continuing its court fight against Wheaton PharmaTech, a competing company that had tried to woo him away. John Paproski, The West Co.'s operations director for its U.S. health-care products division, was rumored to be considering a job with Wheaton PharmaTech - taking valuable trade secrets and 14 years of experience - when the company confronted him. Paproski, company officials say, then abruptly resigned.
NEWS
May 27, 2009 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an unusual action, the Philadelphia Board of Ethics has fined its own executive director $500 for violating a city rule on confidentiality. The violation, disclosed in a news release at 5 p.m. Friday, occurred in the days leading up to the May 19 primary election for district attorney. The fine represented "nothing more than the fact that we are trying to be even-handed even with our own, and that if there are mistakes, we will deal with them," Ethics Board chairman Richard Glazer said yesterday.
NEWS
January 21, 2002 | By Dean P. Johnson
The U.S. Supreme Court is mulling over whether peer grading violates the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. Its decision could open a Pandora's box of issues, including publishing honor rolls, posting graded assignments on a bulletin board, or allowing students to hand out graded work. Here's what it might sound like in a classroom if the court rules against peer grading: Good morning, class. Today you may notice a few changes around the school. These changes are in compliance with the U.S. Supreme Court ruling on student confidentiality and parental rights.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Borough of Runnemede and one of its police officers are liable for damages for disclosing to a resident that her neighbor had AIDS, according to a ruling yesterday in U.S. District Court in Camden. The ruling is the result of a 1988 civil complaint by the wife of the AIDS patient and the couple's four children. The family was ostracized as a result of the disclosure, according to the complaint. Representatives of AIDS advocacy groups throughout the country said yesterday that they knew of no similar cases.
NEWS
July 16, 2002
By Carl Golden When Gov. McGreevey used an executive order to shut off access to potentially thousands of government documents (only 24 hours after the new Open Public Records Law went into effect), he irked those who fought for the new statute, but he also sharpened the focus on the near impossibility of drafting a law that satisfies everybody. The futility of using statutory authority to define with precision the public's right to see each and every document produced or maintained by government entities has been made clearer by McGreevey's action.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
In a precedent-setting decision, U.S. District Judge Stanley Brotman has dismissed a suit against Mantua Township filed last year by former deputy clerk Jeanette Zold. In his decision, filed May 14 in U.S. District Court in Camden, Brotman found no basis for Zold's argument that she was fired from her job when the Republicans took control of Mantua after the 1988 election because she was a registered Democrat. Zold had been hired in 1987 by the then Democratic- controlled Township Committee.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2012 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Human Genome Sciences Inc. filed a plan with regulators Thursday to try to block GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.'s $2.6 billion takeover offer for the Maryland-based pharmaceutical company. The shareholder-rights plan — a corporate tactic often called a poison pill because it discourages takeover attempts — was part of several filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. It would allow current shareholders to buy stock at a discounted price if anyone acquired more than 15 percent of the stock.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By Allison Steele and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Judge Kevin Dougherty, head of the city's Juvenile and Family Courts, acknowledged Thursday that in 2002 he placed a young girl in the custody of her aunt, convicted murderer Linda Ann Weston - and added that he did so at the recommendation of the Department of Human Services, a child advocate, and the girl's mother. Police say the child, Beatrice Weston, became a prisoner and endured years of severe abuse in her aunt's custody. Beatrice Weston, now 19, was rescued by investigators earlier this month after police discovered that Linda Weston was keeping four mentally disabled adults in a basement dungeon in Tacony and allegedly stealing their Social Security checks.
NEWS
February 8, 2002
Enron, Cheney and the energy task force Unless the General Accounting Office has specific allegations of fraud or corruption perpetrated by Vice President Cheney's energy task force, it should back off ("The risk of White House secrecy," Feb. 3). Otherwise, it is simply involved in a fishing expedition. That the GAO reduced its original demands is irrelevant. Fishing is fishing, regardless of the method one uses. There is no parallel between this situation and Hillary Rodham Clinton's health-care debacle.
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