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Confidentiality

BUSINESS
April 28, 2010 | By KIRSTIN LINDERMAYER For the Daily News
ANDREW Voudouris was only 15 when he joined his older brother, Steve, then 17, and their good friend Chris Francy in launching an online company called Xoxide.com (pronounced ex-oxide) in his parents' garage. They began by selling custom-built computers - and sold them pretty quickly. The company soon morphed into a computer-accessories store, selling everything from elaborately designed cases to PC tachometers, a "speedometer for computers" that the guys invented to measure how hard a computer is working.
NEWS
August 18, 2009 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citing undisclosed health reasons and a possible appeal of his conviction and sentence, lawyers for former State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo yesterday asked a federal judge to postpone his Aug. 31 surrender to the Bureau of Prisons. If U.S. District Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter, who on July 14 sentenced Fumo to 55 months in prison, grants the request, the 66-year-old South Philadelphia Democrat could avoid prison for months as legal issues are sorted out. Federal prosecutors filed a notice this month setting the stage for an appeal of Fumo's sentence, which they had called "unduly lenient.
NEWS
June 5, 2009 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Council's smoldering distaste for the Board of Ethics it created three years ago erupted yesterday as Council Majority Leader Marian B. Tasco called for the ouster of its executive director. Tasco demanded the removal of J. Shane Creamer Jr., the only person to hold the post, based on his admitted violation of the board's confidentiality code last month when he discussed an investigation of Democratic district attorney candidate R. Seth Williams with a Philadelphia Daily News reporter.
NEWS
May 27, 2009 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an unusual action, the Philadelphia Board of Ethics has fined its own executive director $500 for violating a city rule on confidentiality. The violation, disclosed in a news release at 5 p.m. Friday, occurred in the days leading up to the May 19 primary election for district attorney. The fine represented "nothing more than the fact that we are trying to be even-handed even with our own, and that if there are mistakes, we will deal with them," Ethics Board chairman Richard Glazer said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Comics Guy had planned on reviewing a book that has hit much of comicdom like an atomic bomb and (almost) broke the Internet in half, but that will have to wait until next week. This week, I would like to highlight a book that has flown under the radar: "Batman Confidential. " For the first year of its publication, I questioned the necessity of this title's existence. The first story arc was mediocre at best, was made worse by artist Whilce Portacio's horrific depiction of the Dark Knight and featured - yawn - Lex Luthor as the villain.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2008 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A prominent researcher who reviewed a critical study on the diabetes drug Avandia for a major medical journal leaked the findings before publication to the drug's maker, GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., according to the journal Nature. The reviewer, Steven M. Haffner, a professor of internal medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, breached confidentiality rules of the New England Journal of Medicine by faxing the study to a friend working for GlaxoSmithKline, in Upper Merion.
SPORTS
November 9, 2007 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
Formula One's spying scandal took another twist yesterday when Renault was accused by the sport's governing body of possessing confidential information belonging to rival team McLaren. FIA has summoned Renault officials to a hearing of the World Motor Sport Council on Dec. 6 in Monte Carlo, Monaco, to answer a charge of having "unauthorized possession of documents and confidential information" of Mc-Laren cars between September 2006 and October 2007. The information includes "but [is]
NEWS
November 7, 2007 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Even as lawmakers boast that open-records legislation pending in the Capitol would greatly expand access to government documents, legislators are moving to make Pennsylvania the only state in the nation to keep all e-mail confidential. A bill scheduled to be voted on later this month in the House of Representatives would make e-mail by public officials and employees protected records, no matter how routine the subject. Lawmakers contend this is necessary to allow unfettered policy-making and constituent service.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2007 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's the American dream to go out on your own and build a company, but it's the American reality that you can end up in court over it. David Paul headed development of spine products at a Chester County orthopedic-device company when he resigned in 2003 to create a rival enterprise. Now his growing firm, Globus Medical Inc., is on trial in federal court in Philadelphia, accused by Paul's former employer, Synthes (USA) L.P., of benefiting from the use of trade secrets and confidential information, including product designs, manufacturing methods and regulatory strategies.
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