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Confidentiality

SPORTS
March 5, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
THE PLAYERS' association believes the leak of NL MVP Ryan Braun's drug test was an isolated occurrence. ESPN reported in December that Braun tested positive for elevated testosterone. Representatives of the Milwaukee outfielder argued during a grievance hearing that specified procedures for handling the sample were not followed, and arbitrator Shyam Das last month overturned the 50-game suspension Braun faced. "Everybody associated with the case is extremely disappointed that it leaked out," union head Michael Weiner said yesterday at the Brewers' training camp.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By Allison Steele and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Judge Kevin Dougherty, head of the city's Juvenile and Family Courts, acknowledged Thursday that in 2002 he placed a young girl in the custody of her aunt, convicted murderer Linda Ann Weston - and added that he did so at the recommendation of the Department of Human Services, a child advocate, and the girl's mother. Police say the child, Beatrice Weston, became a prisoner and endured years of severe abuse in her aunt's custody. Beatrice Weston, now 19, was rescued by investigators earlier this month after police discovered that Linda Weston was keeping four mentally disabled adults in a basement dungeon in Tacony and allegedly stealing their Social Security checks.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2010 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When three salesmen from a rival firm offered to come on board at Standard Medical Supply Inc., founder Tony Ferrante thought it would be a way to expand the company. Two years after they arrived, they quit and started a competing business. Now, Ferrante and his erstwhile sales crew are in court in Delaware County, arguing about whether the crew built their new business by making unfair use of Standard's pricing strategy for its product line of bedpans, catheters, and oxygen tanks. When the economy is moving up or down, sensitivity can be heightened to such things as breaches of confidentiality and employee duty of loyalty, trade secrets, and noncompete contracts.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2010 | By KIRSTIN LINDERMAYER For the Daily News
ANDREW Voudouris was only 15 when he joined his older brother, Steve, then 17, and their good friend Chris Francy in launching an online company called Xoxide.com (pronounced ex-oxide) in his parents' garage. They began by selling custom-built computers - and sold them pretty quickly. The company soon morphed into a computer-accessories store, selling everything from elaborately designed cases to PC tachometers, a "speedometer for computers" that the guys invented to measure how hard a computer is working.
NEWS
August 18, 2009 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citing undisclosed health reasons and a possible appeal of his conviction and sentence, lawyers for former State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo yesterday asked a federal judge to postpone his Aug. 31 surrender to the Bureau of Prisons. If U.S. District Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter, who on July 14 sentenced Fumo to 55 months in prison, grants the request, the 66-year-old South Philadelphia Democrat could avoid prison for months as legal issues are sorted out. Federal prosecutors filed a notice this month setting the stage for an appeal of Fumo's sentence, which they had called "unduly lenient.
NEWS
June 5, 2009 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Council's smoldering distaste for the Board of Ethics it created three years ago erupted yesterday as Council Majority Leader Marian B. Tasco called for the ouster of its executive director. Tasco demanded the removal of J. Shane Creamer Jr., the only person to hold the post, based on his admitted violation of the board's confidentiality code last month when he discussed an investigation of Democratic district attorney candidate R. Seth Williams with a Philadelphia Daily News reporter.
NEWS
May 27, 2009 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an unusual action, the Philadelphia Board of Ethics has fined its own executive director $500 for violating a city rule on confidentiality. The violation, disclosed in a news release at 5 p.m. Friday, occurred in the days leading up to the May 19 primary election for district attorney. The fine represented "nothing more than the fact that we are trying to be even-handed even with our own, and that if there are mistakes, we will deal with them," Ethics Board chairman Richard Glazer said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Comics Guy had planned on reviewing a book that has hit much of comicdom like an atomic bomb and (almost) broke the Internet in half, but that will have to wait until next week. This week, I would like to highlight a book that has flown under the radar: "Batman Confidential. " For the first year of its publication, I questioned the necessity of this title's existence. The first story arc was mediocre at best, was made worse by artist Whilce Portacio's horrific depiction of the Dark Knight and featured - yawn - Lex Luthor as the villain.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2008 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A prominent researcher who reviewed a critical study on the diabetes drug Avandia for a major medical journal leaked the findings before publication to the drug's maker, GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., according to the journal Nature. The reviewer, Steven M. Haffner, a professor of internal medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, breached confidentiality rules of the New England Journal of Medicine by faxing the study to a friend working for GlaxoSmithKline, in Upper Merion.
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