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Confidentiality

NEWS
May 20, 2007 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
None of the six private groups hired to manage 41 Philadelphia public schools - including for-profit Edison Schools Inc. - has shown "sufficient" academic progress, and the district should consider axing them when their contracts expire in June, according to an internal school district report obtained by The Inquirer. At best, only 14 - about a third - of the schools run by the groups deserve contract renewals, the report said. Those schools met federal targets for academic improvement in 2005, 2006 or both, according to the report.
NEWS
May 20, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
None of the six private groups hired to manage 41 Philadelphia public schools - including for-profit Edison Schools Inc. - has shown "sufficient" academic progress, and the district should consider axing them when their contracts expire in June, according to an internal school district report obtained by The Inquirer. At best, only 14 - about a third - of the schools run by the groups deserve contract renewals, the report said. Those schools met federal targets for academic improvement in 2005, 2006 or both, according to the report.
NEWS
March 29, 2007 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citing his wife's confidential salary agreement, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah yesterday became the only one of Philadelphia's five major mayoral candidates to decline to release his recent income tax returns. Fattah said he cannot disclose the returns he files jointly with his wife, NBC10 anchorwoman Renee Chenault-Fattah, because her contract bars her from revealing her salary. After the Daily News yesterday published a headline calling Fattah's confidentiality claim "bogus," Chenault-Fattah agreed to an Inquirer request to provide a copy of the non-disclosure clause of her television contract.
NEWS
December 17, 2006 | By Angela Couloumbis and Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
When the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board finally decides who will be awarded lucrative slots-parlor licenses, it will do so behind closed doors. Although members will eventually take a public vote to award 11 licenses in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and other locations, any discussions and deliberations leading up to it will be held in private. The reason: Talks will involve privileged financial information about the applicants and confidential background information about the people running the companies.
NEWS
October 15, 2006 | By John Sullivan and Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
When a child on the Department of Human Services' watch is killed by a caregiver, city and state officials comb through case files and interview social workers to find out what went wrong. But the public never hears the results of those investigations. Officials say the so-called "death reviews" are kept confidential by law to protect children, families and witnesses. Critics contend that the secrecy serves another end: to shield the agency from embarrassment and accountability.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2006 | By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Daily News
"Art School Confidential" suffers from the same affliction that made "American Dreamz" such a misfire. Satirizing art schools - particularly coming from writer Daniel Clowes, who went to Manhattan's Pratt Institute - is too easy and, for all intents and purposes, pointless. "American Idol," Bush-Cheney and institutionalized art do a fine job of self-parody, thank you very much. To be fair, for the first hour or so, "Art School Confidential" is much funnier than "American Dreamz" (but then, so is a trip to the dentist)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2005 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
FOR TATTLE'S money, Fox should have told Simon Cowell to pack up his insults and his attitude and scram, but the network caved in to the T-shirt-wearing Brit and signed Cowell for another five years of "American Idol," continuing to allow him to sign "Idol" winners to his label at BMG Records. (People liked Judge Wapner too, Fox, but when he left the air they watched another judge.) Even more exciting for the folks who plan their weeks around the glorified karaoke contest that is "Idol," Fox has new plans to help the people who pine for Clay, Ruben, Kelly, Fantasia and Carrie to keep in touch with every last note over cell phones and the Internet, even adding an additional pay-content section.
NEWS
September 10, 2005 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As jurors watched testimony and studied evidence during the recent murder trial of Ronald Burris, some appeared to be taking voluminous notes in court-issued notebooks. Others seemed to jot only a few things down. To see jurors with pen and paper in hand is a big change for Pennsylvania's criminal-justice system, which until Aug. 1 prohibited jury note-taking during trials. Now, the state Supreme Court is conducting a two-year test program, allowing jurors to take notes in all criminal cases lasting at least three days.
NEWS
June 23, 2005 | By Tina Moore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Actor Bill Cosby is not opposed to protecting the identities of women seeking to testify against him in a sexual assault lawsuit - as long as their lawyers keep their allegations against him secret, too, his attorney said in federal court yesterday. Attorney Patrick O'Connor said Cosby seeks "balanced confidentiality" in the case that now involves a dozen women - nine seeking to remain anonymous. U.S. District Judge Eduardo C. Robreno earlier rejected Cosby's bid for a gag order on the widely publicized case brought by a 31-year-old former Temple University employee.
NEWS
May 5, 2005 | By Tina Moore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Attorneys in the civil court sexual-assault case against comedian Bill Cosby are asking a federal judge in Philadelphia to shroud the proceedings in secrecy. In a motion filed last week, Cosby's Philadelphia attorney asked U.S. District Judge Eduardo C. Robreno to protect Cosby from "undue embarrassment" by requiring that "all information uncovered or obtained in discovery . . . be treated as confidential. " "I know he's a public figure, but everybody deserves some privacy," attorney Patrick O'Connor said.
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