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Confirmation Hearing

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NEWS
January 15, 2009 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Reprising a familiar role, Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.) plans to challenge President-elect Barack Obama's nominee for attorney general over Clinton-era pardons and other controversies during today's scheduled confirmation hearing. Eric J. Holder showed a tendency to bend to the political winds when he was deputy attorney general in the Clinton administration, Specter, the ranking Republican on the Judiciary Committee, said last week in a floor speech outlining his concerns. In an interview this week, Specter said: "The attorney general has to have the courage and the stature, the independence, to say no. " So far, Holder has endured more sustained criticism from senators than any of Obama's other cabinet nominees, though most say they believe the nomination is not in danger.
NEWS
June 27, 2000 | By John S. Goldkamp and M. Kay Harris
Pennsylvania's two U.S. Senators, Arlen Spector and Rick Santorum, need to be called to task for their failure to arrange for a Senate confirmation hearing on the nomination of Legrome Davis to be a federal judge. Davis, the supervising judge of the Criminal Division of the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, was nominated to be a U.S. District Court judge in Philadelphia by President Clinton in July 1998 and again in January 1999. His nomination drew accolades from all quarters in light of Davis' intellect, reputation for fairness, balanced temperament and integrity.
NEWS
March 28, 2001 | By Eugene Kiely INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
In an unprecedented move to defuse the controversy surrounding his choice for state treasurer, acting Gov. Donald T. DiFrancesco yesterday allowed ranking members of the state Senate Judiciary Committee to review the state-police background check of Isabel Miranda. The committee had been scheduled to take up Miranda's nomination Monday, but its chairman, Sen. William Gormley (R., Atlantic), postponed the hearing after a published report said a former employer, Citibank, had fired Miranda for misusing company funds.
NEWS
July 1, 2010
Excerpts from Wednesday's confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan: Kagan , denying that she had tried as an adviser to President Bill Clinton to allow, in line with her own views on abortion, the broadest possible practice of a late-term procedure that opponents call "partial-birth" abortion: "It's not true. I had no agenda with respect to this issue. " Sen. Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.): "I certainly have an agenda when it comes to abortion. You can be pro-choice and be just as patriotic as I am. You can be just as religious as anybody I know.
NEWS
March 10, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Sen. Byron L. Dorgan (D., N.D.) announced plans yesterday to block the Senate's confirmation of Mark McClellan, President Bush's choice to run Medicare, until he answered senators' questions about drug reimportation. McClellan, whose nomination to head the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services was approved, 18-2, yesterday by the Senate Finance Committee, on Monday refused a request from Dorgan and Sens. John McCain (R., Ariz.) and Debbie Stabenow (D., Mich.) to testify before the Senate commerce committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin and INQUIRER Culture WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra Association can exit from bankruptcy on an expedited schedule. In a hearing Monday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Judge Eric L. Frank said he would approve a timeline to bring the orchestra before the court again on June 28 for a confirmation hearing. Because of the "aggressive scheduling," Frank said, any objections to the orchestra's reorganization plan would have to be heard at the confirmation hearing, which could take a day or two. The judge, after reviewing a list of procedural concerns, said he was approving the quicker-than-usual schedule in recognition of the case's notoriety, suggesting that any interested parties were already aware of the bankruptcy.
NEWS
July 17, 2009 | Inquirer staff
Nearly 10 hours into the fourth day of Sonia Sotomayor's confirmation hearing, JoAnne A. Epps, dean of the Temple University Beasley School of Law, testified yesterday evening in praise of the nominee and urged that senators "send a strong message" by confirming her. Epps, addressing the hearing as part of its final panel of outside witnesses, spoke in her capacity as cochair of the National Association of Women Lawyers' Committee for the Evaluation...
NEWS
February 6, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
A Senate committee yesterday approved the nomination of Rodney E. Slater to be transportation secretary. His nomination was sent to the Senate on a voice vote. "Mr. Slater, I believe, is a credit to the nation and the state of Arkansas," said Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.), chairman of the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee. Slater, an aide to President Clinton when he was governor of Arkansas, has been federal highway administrator for four years. Also yesterday, Janet F. Yellen, who is set to leave the Federal Reserve for a top White House economic post, said at her confirmation hearing that she would like to see economic growth pick up. "I'm not satisfied with 2.5 percent growth, and I don't think anybody should be satisfied with 2.5 percent growth," Yellen told the Senate Banking Committee.
NEWS
June 6, 1986 | By Paul Horvitz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Home-county senators are blocking the reappointment of two New Jersey Supreme Court justices in what could be an emerging test of the patronage practice called "senatorial courtesy. " The two Republican senators say the justices have participated in court decisions that usurp legislative authority. The ruling most often cited is the court's 1983 Mount Laurel housing decision, which both senators have denounced. So far, whatever tension there may be between the two senators and Gov. Kean has remained largely private.
NEWS
August 4, 1997
"[The president] . . . by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors . . . " With those few words, the U.S. Constitution spells out the selection process for appointive positions in the federal government, from consuls to Supreme Court justices. But increasingly, the straightforward process of advice and consent has become a heated rhetorical war that plays out in the media, pre-empting the traditional confirmation hearing before a committee of thoughtful and deliberative senators.
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NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) has given his approval to advance a Philadelphia judge's nomination to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, clearing one obstacle for a nominee who critics argued was being stalled over politics. Toomey has submitted his "blue slip" to the Judiciary Committee, giving his blessing to holding a hearing on the nomination of Luis Felipe Restrepo, a federal judge in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. A spokeswoman for the senator confirmed the move.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Alicia A. Caldwell, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama's choice to be the No. 2 official at the Department of Homeland Security used his appearance before a Senate panel Thursday to adamantly deny allegations that he helped a politically connected company obtain a foreign investor visa. But the lawmakers who may need the most convincing - the eight Republican members of the Senate Homeland Security Committee - weren't in the room for the nearly two-hour confirmation hearing. Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma, the panel's ranking Republican, said in a statement that he wouldn't participate in the hearing until allegations against Alejandro Mayorkas were resolved.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Ernesto Londoño, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Chuck Hagel, President Obama's nominee as defense secretary, confronted withering criticism during a marathon confirmation hearing Thursday, but administration officials said they felt confident that the Republican-led attacks did not derail his bid to lead the Pentagon. Lawmakers from both parties spent roughly eight hours grilling Hagel about remarks he has made at various points of his career and the votes he had cast in the Senate. The nominee at times struggled as he sought to explain his past positions, in some cases distancing himself from them.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin and INQUIRER Culture WRITER
The Philadelphia Orchestra Association can exit from bankruptcy on an expedited schedule. In a hearing Monday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Judge Eric L. Frank said he would approve a timeline to bring the orchestra before the court again on June 28 for a confirmation hearing. Because of the "aggressive scheduling," Frank said, any objections to the orchestra's reorganization plan would have to be heard at the confirmation hearing, which could take a day or two. The judge, after reviewing a list of procedural concerns, said he was approving the quicker-than-usual schedule in recognition of the case's notoriety, suggesting that any interested parties were already aware of the bankruptcy.
NEWS
June 2, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - In January, Gov. Christie named the nation's only openly gay African American Republican mayor as a nominee to the state Supreme Court, marking an extraordinary moment in New Jersey history. The Democrats' rejection Thursday of that nominee, Bruce Harris, may have been even more extraordinary. After he denied tenure to the court's only African American justice, John Wallace of Gloucester County, Democrats had pushed Christie for a "diverse" nominee, saying it was his obligation to offer a jurist who could bring another perspective to the now all-white court.
NEWS
February 19, 2012
Home may be where the heart is, but in New Jersey, home is wherever politicians and judges say it is. From Congress to the Legislature, the quirks of residency laws have become the Garden State's latest political sideshow. Last week, Republican Gov. Christie's acting education commissioner, Christopher Cerf, seemed to be on the verge of getting a long-awaited confirmation hearing. The fact that Cerf lives in Essex County has allowed the Democratic state senator there, Ron Rice, to single-handedly block any Cerf hearing through a process known as senatorial courtesy.
NEWS
May 31, 2011 | By Maya Rao, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - A year of political fireworks leading up to the confirmation hearing of Gov. Christie's first Supreme Court nominee ended in praise and mostly friendly questioning before the Senate Judiciary Committee gave its approval 11 to 1 today. The hearing for Anne Patterson lasted 2 ½ hours but contained none of the confrontational atmosphere expected for a nominee whose progress has been stalled for months by Democrats angry with Christie's efforts to remake the court. The Republican governor picked the Morris County lawyer in May 2010 to replace John Wallace, a justice whom Christie decided to deny tenure after seven years over concerns that he and the top court were legislating from the bench.
NEWS
May 30, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie's attempt to overhaul the New Jersey Supreme Court will finally get under way Tuesday, when confirmation hearings begin for a North Jersey corporate lawyer he nominated to the bench more than a year ago. For Christie, Anne M. Patterson's audience with the state Senate Judiciary Committee couldn't happen soon enough. Last week, the court ruled in favor of additional funding for 31 poor school districts, sending the Republican governor what he called an unauthorized "invoice" for $500 million.
NEWS
July 1, 2010
Excerpts from Wednesday's confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan: Kagan , denying that she had tried as an adviser to President Bill Clinton to allow, in line with her own views on abortion, the broadest possible practice of a late-term procedure that opponents call "partial-birth" abortion: "It's not true. I had no agenda with respect to this issue. " Sen. Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.): "I certainly have an agenda when it comes to abortion. You can be pro-choice and be just as patriotic as I am. You can be just as religious as anybody I know.
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - Sen. Arlen Specter, Democrat of Pennsylvania, wasn't getting straight answers and was kind of grumpy about it, peering down Tuesday at Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan and lashing her with questions - as if she were a first-year law student who had overslept and didn't know the cases for the day. "Let me go on to another question - I have not been making much progress," Specter said at one point, exasperated after the former Harvard...
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