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Congestive Heart Failure

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October 14, 1999 | By Anthony L. Gargano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A day later, it is no different. A city's flags remain at half-staff, the tragic news of the death of one Wilton Norman Chamberlain only half-digested. It is still so fresh. The man whom many thought would live forever had succumbed to mortality. Sy Goldberg, Chamberlain's agent and longtime friend, yesterday told the Associated Press that Chamberlain had endured heart problems for years. According to Goldberg, they killed him. "He had congestive heart failure," Goldberg said the day after Chamberlain's death at age 63. "He had deteriorated relatively quickly over the last month or so. " Chamberlain had lost 30 or 40 pounds over the last few weeks as doctors drained his legs of fluid that had accumulated because of his heart trouble, Goldberg said.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
Cartoonist Ed Dodd, creator of "Mark Trail," the he-man outdoorsman of the comics, died of congestive heart failure Monday at Northeast Georgia Medical Center in Gainesville, Ga. He was 88. Dodd created "Mark Trail" in 1946 and it became a favorite of millions of newspaper readers.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cardinal John Krol was discharged from Thomas Jefferson University Hospital yesterday, just nine days after complaining of shortness of breath that doctors later diagnosed as congestive heart failure. Cardinal Krol, retired archbishop of the Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia, was "back to normal" according to a statement by Dr. Joseph Majdan, who credited the 83-year-old prelate's recovery to "will and stamina. " For much of his stay, Cardinal Krol was given intravenous diuretics prescribed to clear fluid from his lungs.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
Allan Arbus, 95, an actor best known for his recurring role as the caring psychiatrist who ministered to shell-shocked surgeons and troops on the TV series M*A*S*H, died Friday at his home in Los Angeles, his family said. The cause was complications of congestive heart failure, his daughter Arin said. As psychiatrist Sidney Freedman, a role in which he appeared throughout the long-running series, Mr. Arbus was so believable that M*A*S*H star Alan Alda later said he long assumed the actor had expertise in the field.
NEWS
March 14, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
NOT A PRETTY PICTURE Remember the picturephone? At the 1964-65 New York World's Fair, AT&T predicted that callers would regularly be able to see the person to whom they were speaking within a few years. Three years ago, three companies finally began seriously marketing such phones in this country. But apparently the wave of the future still hasn't broken. Devices made by Sony and Mitsubishi are not hot sellers and Panasonic has dropped out of the market. BUTT OUT When you decide to quit smoking, women, don't do it just before your period.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: I've been awakened four times by attacks in which I haven't been able to inhale and catch my breath. I gasp, and the fear of death is always present. My doctor relates these spasms to my scleroderma, but I don't understand the connection. A: People who are awakened at night by breathing difficulties (or who cannot comfortably lie flat) are often experiencing congestive heart failure, the accumulation of excess fluid in the lungs from a weak heart. This is serious. The condition must be diagnosed and treated, usually with heart stimulants (such as digitalis)
NEWS
January 3, 2012
Thomas T. Johnson, 88, a retired Los Angeles County Superior Court judge who in 1981 ruled that the Holocaust was "a fact and not reasonably subject to dispute," died of congestive heart failure Wednesday at home in Los Angeles. Judge Johnson made the unusual pronouncement in a case brought by Long Beach, Calif., businessman Mel Mermelstein against the Institute for Historical Review, a Torrance, Calif., organization that claimed the planned extermination of Jews by the Nazis was a myth.
NEWS
February 8, 1989 | By Edith L. Dixon, Special to The Inquirer
Margaret A. Rogers Bernard, 75, who served as postmaster in Gloucester Heights for 18 years, died Sunday at Underwood-Memorial Hospital, Woodbury, of congestive heart failure. A resident of Gloucester City, she was postmaster for the Gloucester Heights post office from the mid-1930s until it was closed in the 1950s. Mrs. Bernard then worked as a clerk at the Gloucester City post office before retiring in 1963. Before working for the U.S. Postal Service, she helped run her family's grocery business on Nicholson Road in Gloucester Heights.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
Composer, arranger, bandleader, producer, and teacher Wardell Quezergue, 81, who arranged "Chapel of Love" for the Dixie Cups and was dubbed the "Creole Beethoven" by Allen Toussaint, has died. He died Tuesday of congestive heart failure, said son Brian Quezergue. Hits arranged by Mr. Quezergue include "Iko Iko" for the Dixie Cups, "Big Chief" for Professor Longhair, "Mr. Big Stuff" for Jean Knight, and "Groove Me" for King Floyd - the last two recorded the same day in 1961 at Mr. Quezergue's Malaco Records in Jackson, Miss.
NEWS
January 30, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Walter J. Costello, 87, who began his career at The Inquirer as a copy boy in 1939 and retired in 1989 as the newspaper's advertising art director, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at Nazareth Hospital. Mr. Costello, who lived in the city, was also the volunteer board chairman of the credit union at The Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News from the late 1960s to the late 1990s. Earl Laney, former president of the credit union, said Mr. Costello served longer than any other chairman and at his retirement was named director emeritus, "the only person given that honor.
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NEWS
September 15, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Word out of Harrisburg is that Gov. Corbett may take the money offered under the Affordable Care Act to expand Medicaid if the federal government agrees to changes in the health program. It's a ray of hope for more than 500,000 Pennsylvanians who otherwise will be shut out from coverage. "These are the people who work, who clean the houses, work in back of restaurants and hotels, and push the gurneys around in hospital," said John Dodds, director of the Philadelphia Unemployment Project.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
Allan Arbus, 95, an actor best known for his recurring role as the caring psychiatrist who ministered to shell-shocked surgeons and troops on the TV series M*A*S*H, died Friday at his home in Los Angeles, his family said. The cause was complications of congestive heart failure, his daughter Arin said. As psychiatrist Sidney Freedman, a role in which he appeared throughout the long-running series, Mr. Arbus was so believable that M*A*S*H star Alan Alda later said he long assumed the actor had expertise in the field.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Kasie Hunt, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Former Vice President Dick Cheney had a heart transplant Saturday and is recovering at a Virginia hospital, his office said. An aide disclosed that Cheney, 71, who has had a long history of cardiovascular trouble including numerous heart attacks, had been waiting for a transplant for more than 20 months. "Although the former vice president and his family do not know the identity of the donor, they will be forever grateful for this lifesaving gift," aide Kara Ahern said in a written statement that was authenticated by several of the Republican politician's close associates.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Phillip Geliebter, an Abington police detective, recalled that his father, David, "consistently lived his faith" as a Quaker. "When he was arrested for civil disobedience on the first day of the second Gulf War at the federal building in Philadelphia, that was a matter of faith," Phillip Geliebter said in a phone interview. Later, his father worked on a Quaker committee dealing with problems faced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender teenagers, his son said, because "he continued to have an interest in making sure that everybody was treated equally and fairly.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
THEOLOGIAN William Hamilton, a member of the Death of God movement of the 1960s that reached its peak with a Time magazine cover story, has died in Portland, Ore. He was 87. Hamilton died Tuesday from complications of congestive heart failure, his family said. Hamilton told the Oregonian newspaper in 2007 that he had questioned the existence of God from when he was a teenager, when two friends - an Episcopalian and a Catholic - died from the explosion of a pipe bomb they were building, and a third - an atheist - escaped without a scratch.
NEWS
January 3, 2012
Thomas T. Johnson, 88, a retired Los Angeles County Superior Court judge who in 1981 ruled that the Holocaust was "a fact and not reasonably subject to dispute," died of congestive heart failure Wednesday at home in Los Angeles. Judge Johnson made the unusual pronouncement in a case brought by Long Beach, Calif., businessman Mel Mermelstein against the Institute for Historical Review, a Torrance, Calif., organization that claimed the planned extermination of Jews by the Nazis was a myth.
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  When a memorial service was held for Walter Annenberg at the Academy of Music in December 2002, Joseph E. Centofanti was there, seated next to the former ambassador's pilot and butler. Mr. Centofanti, an internationally recognized master tailor who worked from a shop in Ardmore, had made Annenberg's suits for years. "My look" in each suit, Mr. Centofanti said in a 2008 Inquirer interview, "is for the chairman of the board. " On Monday, Oct. 31, Mr. Centofanti, 93, whose early life took him from Philadelphia to Italy to Ethiopia and back to the States before he began fashioning suits costing thousands of dollars, died of congestive heart failure at his home in Ardmore.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Inquirer reporter Edgar Williams profiled Lansdale Mayor Michael DiNunzio in 1990, he wrote: "This is a man on whom the tag 'The Most Happy Fella,' after Frank Loesser's hit Broadway musical of yore, would look good. " On Sunday, Oct. 2, Mr. DiNunzio, 93, mayor of the Montgomery County borough from 1982 through 2008, died of congestive heart failure at Abington Health - Lansdale Hospital. He had lived in the borough since 1926. Since his first run for mayor in 1981, Williams wrote, Mr. DiNunzio had not campaigned "in the generally accepted sense of the word.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
Composer, arranger, bandleader, producer, and teacher Wardell Quezergue, 81, who arranged "Chapel of Love" for the Dixie Cups and was dubbed the "Creole Beethoven" by Allen Toussaint, has died. He died Tuesday of congestive heart failure, said son Brian Quezergue. Hits arranged by Mr. Quezergue include "Iko Iko" for the Dixie Cups, "Big Chief" for Professor Longhair, "Mr. Big Stuff" for Jean Knight, and "Groove Me" for King Floyd - the last two recorded the same day in 1961 at Mr. Quezergue's Malaco Records in Jackson, Miss.
SPORTS
August 13, 2011
Sparked by a 34-point performance from junior Dominic Cheek , the Villanova men's basketball team picked up a 94-92 victory over the Israeli Senior National Team on Friday evening in Almere, The Netherlands. Cheek drained 15 of 19 field goal attempts on the night, including all three of his attempts from beyond the three-point arc. Mouphtaou Yarou tallied 22 points and 12 rebounds. Maalik Wayns scored 17 points in spite of second-half foul trouble. "It sounds crazy to say this in August," Villanova coach Jay Wright said, "but that was a great basketball game and a great win for us. I thought our young guys did a tremendous job against a tough, veteran team that spreads you out defensively.
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