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NEWS
June 23, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by David M. Warren
Congregants and supporters of First Baptist Church in Glassboro rallied yesterday for a Service of Solidarity, held in the parking lot of the burned church. The church was destroyed by arson May 30. The congregation has been holding services in the A to Z maintenance building on South Delsea Drive and will continue to do so until the church is rebuilt.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | By Gina Esposito, Special to The Inquirer
Two local synagogues have plans to merge and form a single Conservative congregation that will build on a site on Skippack Pike in Whitpain. The Norristown congregation of Tiferes Israel and the Lansdale congregation of Beth Israel plan to worship together, according to Jay Weiss, a spokesperson of the Norristown Jewish Community Center. Although the congregation does not have a name yet, the synagogue is hoped to be constructed by October 1989, Weiss said. The building that Tiferes Israel used is under an agreement to be bought by the Sacred Heart Hospital and the Suburban General Hospital, Weiss said.
NEWS
December 29, 2004 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER FAITH LIFE EDITOR
Cinema verit? filmmakers Alan and Susan Raymond got more verit? than they bargained for when they set out two years ago to capture life at First United Methodist Church of Germantown. Their two-hour documentary, The Congregation, airs at 9:30 tonight on PBS (Channel 12). The old stone church on Germantown Avenue is a haven of liberal activism at a time when so much of Christianity is tilting to the right. That drew in the Raymonds as an intriguing modern-day story line. The congregation also was in the throes of a difficult transition from a longtime, lionized pastor to his more conventional successor.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Hymnals in hand, members of Kemblesville United Methodist Church entered their new 160-seat church building Sunday after a short walk across Route 896 from the Kemblesville Elementary School. The congregation had been holding worship services in the elementary school since fire destroyed the church's 139-year-old sanctuary and nearby fellowship hall on Oct. 26, 1991. Officials determined that the fires were intentionally set, but no arrests have been made. The church will have an open house from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Sunday to show off the new $825,000 building and its furnishings.
NEWS
September 25, 2000 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Our Lady of Guadalupe, the new Roman Catholic parish established earlier this year to serve Buckingham Township, soon will have a new worship site. Beginning Oct. 8, the parish's Sunday Masses will be held at Central Bucks East High School, 2804 Holicong Rd., in Buckingham Township. Masses will be held at 8, 10 and 11:30 a.m. The parish's 5:30 p.m. Saturday vigil Mass will continue to be held at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, 235 E. State St., in Doylestown. Weekend Masses will be held at those locations until the parish has constructed its own building, said the Rev. Joseph J. Quindlen, pastor of the new congregation.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For the 1,100-member congregation of West Chester's Westminster Presbyterian Church, the time had come to make some hard decisions. The space on South Church Street was cramped, parking was a hassle and the building needed substantial work. Like homeowners everywhere, the congregants had two choices - renovate or move. Then came the offer too good to refuse. James K. Robinson Jr., a longtime member of the church, donated 10 acres for a new complex. The land is prime real estate that has been the envy of developers in the region for years.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | By Paul Davies, Special to The Inquirer
Ruth Stanley holds dear a fir tree outside the Unitarian Fellowship Church in West Chester. When her husband, Harry, died 13 years ago, she planted the tree at their church. In the weeks and months that followed, Stanley made sure the sapling was well-watered. One Christmas Eve, a friend decorated the tree with candles. When her sons visit, they stop by to "see how Daddy's tree is doing. " But now, the Unitarian Fellowship plans to move to Marshallton. That means selling the three-story Victorian on North Franklin Street where the fir tree stands sturdy.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Automotive Writer
The 1992 Ford Crown Victoria is more than a revised edition of a popular volume. It is a new book on the full-size domestic sedan. The beauty of the new Crown Vic (apart from its aero styling) is that it manages to retain all the comfortable and convenient attributes its aging congregation loves, while reaching out for younger converts with greater sophistication and performance. Yes, it continues to be a big, comfy, rear-drive sedan with room for six, a studio apartment for a trunk and a husky V-8. And it is still built on a true frame, which means that muscular engine can be put to work towing serious boats and trailers.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | By Laurie Kalmanson, Special to The Inquirer
Adultery, sin and redemption are on the agenda at the Deerfield Presbyterian Church in Cumberland County today, when the congregation will consider whether to censure Pastor Norman A. Koop and accept his resignation. A church investigation begun earlier this year revealed that Mr. Koop, who is married, had an affair in 1984 with a married congregant. The pastor is the son of former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop. In a four-page, single-spaced typed confession delivered to the church leadership on March 5, Mr. Koop admitted committing adultery.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A small Orthodox congregation in Elkins Park was wrongly denied the right to hold services in a residential area, a panel of Commonwealth Court judges has ruled. The decision Friday overturned the Cheltenham Township Zoning Hearing Board and a Common Pleas Court judge who concluded that the Jewish congregation should not be given a special exception to a zoning ordinance because of the traffic problems it could create. Gilbert P. High Jr., the township solicitor, said Tuesday that township commissioners have not had time to determine if they will appeal the ruling, because he received a copy of the ruling only the day before.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 13, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Tausig and her partner were Conservative Jews who came out late in life. But back then, in 2000, the movement had not yet caught up with them. Conservative Judaism was still in the midst of a divisive debate over the ordination of openly gay clergy. Tausig, a psychotherapist, and her partner decided to search for a place where they felt at home. They landed at Congregation Kol Ami, becoming the first openly gay couple to join - and marry - at the Elkins Park synagogue. They felt welcome but believed that true inclusion takes more than the open hearts of fellow congregants.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
PHILLY'S POPULATION of Korean Buddhists doesn't have to travel far for spiritual guidance. Tucked away on a quiet street in East Oak Lane is the Wongaksa Buddhist temple, an institution that rose from humble roots to become a major spiritual center for this tight-knit community. Abbot Monk Do-Myung leads the faithful at the temple, located inside an unassuming house on Chelten Avenue near 6th Street. WHO WE ARE: Wongaksa got its start in the early 1970s, when South Korean expats sought out ways to practice their faith in their new city, Do-Myung said.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbi Steven Lindemann stepped into a tall shadow when he became senior rabbi at Cherry Hill's Temple Beth Sholom in 1992. "I was 44," he recalled last week, and his predecessor, Rabbi Albert Lewis, "had been here 44 years. He started this congregation the year I was born. And he had a very distinctive teaching style. " Leadership stays on at this giant Conservative synagogue. Yet now, after 22 years as Beth Sholom's senior rabbi, Lindemann finds himself in the role of the new tall shadow.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | BY NATALIE POMPILIO, natalie@nataliepompilio.com
THERE IS no "typical" Shabbat service at Society Hill Synagogue. One week, Rabbi Avi Winokur might include the works of Sufi mystics and Muslim spiritual giants. The next might feature writings by Christian leaders, noted intellectuals or Jewish religious thinkers. One way the synagogue describes its open approach is by citing an old joke: "Two Jews, three opinions. " That is to say, different people celebrate their faith in different ways. "It's very eclectic," said Winokur, who has led the congregation for 13 years.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A SOUTH Philadelphia church and a Mount Airy Jewish community group will offer sanctuary to undocumented immigrants as part of a nationwide civil act of disobedience in response to President Obama's inaction on immigration reform. Each congregation will open its doors to house an undocumented immigrant - who will be defying a federal deportation order - and his or her family. This act of civil disobedience is part of a National Day of Action, said Peter Pedemonti, director of the New Sanctuary Movement of Philadelphia, which will hold a news conference today at the Philadelphia Praise Center, on McKean Street near 17th.
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rob Chifokoyo didn't know what to say. The seconds dragged on for what felt like minutes. Sitting in his living room, the only sound was his wife, Lisa, weeping next to him. Eight months ago, Chifokoyo, 30, was facing almost certain death. His kidneys were failing, and treatment in his native Zimbabwe was prohibitively expensive. But he'd been flown to Bucks County at the expense of Doylestown's Covenant Church, then kept alive through dialysis at a local hospital. Eventually, he'd need a kidney transplant.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three small white caskets stood open at the front of the church, covered in flowers. One man doubled over in grief at the sight. Another sagged into the arms of relatives, who struggled to hold him up as he choked out two words: "My boy. " Relatives and friends clung to each other as they made their way down the aisle at the North Philadelphia Seventh-day Adventist Church. One woman rushed down the aisle, crying, "It's not real. " As the bodies of three siblings lay in the white caskets on a bright Monday morning, hundreds filed past to pay their respects - politicians and pastors, teachers from Mary McLeod Bethune Elementary, and even a local motorcycle club, decked out in leather vests.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THE REV. Larry G. Patrick II of Redeem Baptist Church in Strawberry Mansion is equally at home at Wednesday night Bible class and at a protest by Philadelphia fast-food workers demanding a $15-an-hour livable wage. Indeed, Patrick feels his calling as a minister also compels him to fight poverty and gun violence in one of the city's roughest neighborhoods. "There's no way, as a minister, that I cannot stand up and say anything about that," said Patrick, referring to low-wage workers who need food stamps just to put food on their own table.
NEWS
May 5, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
YAEL LEVY keeps herself busy. In addition to serving as a supporting rabbi for Roxborough's Mishkan Shalom synagogue, she works as a spiritual director at Wyncote's Reconstructionist Rabbinical College and Hebrew Union College's New York City branch, helping steer future rabbis. Earlier this year, Levy got some much-deserved recognition: She was named one of "America's Most Inspiring Rabbis" by the Jewish Daily Forward , a national publication. "It's a lovely surprise, and it feels very honoring," said Levy, the only rabbi from Pennsylvania among the 28 selected.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | BY BECKY BATCHA, Daily News Staff Writer batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
BUX-MONT'S landmark Bryn Athyn Cathedral looms large in its community - 180 feet large, measuring to the top of its tallest tower. Inside, the view from the pews is awe-inspiring. Artisans built the place just after the turn of the 20th century to resemble Europe's great medieval churches, down to blowing their own stained glass on site. Outside, the view overlooking the Pennypack Creek Valley from the vast, terraced grounds is breathtaking. But the church's congregation is as ordinary as they come: a button-downed collection of women in sensible, pretty dresses, men in jackets and slacks, and very well-scrubbed college students from Bryn Athyn College across the street.
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