CollectionsCongressional Black Caucus
IN THE NEWS

Congressional Black Caucus

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 27, 2003 | By Kevin Merida
Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D., Texas) is back to being a regular House member, no longer chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus, no longer saddled with the frustrations, anxieties and expectations that title brings. When you are leader of the nation's most prominent group of African American lawmakers, Johnson explains, "everybody wants you to come to their country. " She heard from people in India, Brazil, Australia, Tunisia and elsewhere throughout Africa and the Caribbean.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush is turning his charm offensive on the group of Americans most resistant to his efforts - African Americans. He is waging the campaign on several fronts, both symbolic and substantive. They range from a 90-minute face-to-face White House meeting yesterday with the Congressional Black Caucus - whose members had walked out on his electoral-vote certification - to calling the Rev. Jesse Jackson for a private chat when the civil rights leader became embroiled in a scandal over his fathering of an out-of-wedlock child.
NEWS
September 29, 1995 | By Rachel L. Jones, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Despite growing controversy, the Congressional Black Caucus yesterday formally announced its support of Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan's call for a million black men to march here next month. The support came one day after leaders of two of the nation's largest black religious denominations angrily denied the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson's contention that they had endorsed the march. Rep. Donald M. Payne (D., N.J.), chairman of the caucus, conceded that there had been criticisms in the black community of the Oct. 16 event and said that support for the march was not unanimous among the Black Caucus' 40 members.
NEWS
September 12, 1993 | By Karen Schneider, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When John Conyers arrived in Congress in 1965, he had only five black colleagues for solidarity and support. "We were politically isolated," the Detroit Democrat recalled last week. "We had no influence. " When Eva Clayton, a Democrat from a rural North Carolina district, arrived in January, she was one of 39 blacks in the House. She was promptly elected president of the freshman class - the first time a black person or a woman had held that position. "I can't say I've been treated badly," Clayton said.
NEWS
May 7, 1994 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
It wasn't quite like getting your hand caught in the cookie jar. But it was close. Rep. Tom Foglietta, D-Pa., yesterday was caught touting a 100 percent voting record with the Congressional Black Caucus as an endorsement by the group. The problem is the group's rules prohibit it from endorsing any candidate. The Foglietta campaign printed 10,000 handouts, which are eight pages and look like a newspaper, that included the headline "Congressional Black Caucus Endorses Thomas Foglietta.
NEWS
July 17, 1991 | By Christopher Scanlan, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
When he was chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Clarence Thomas was responsible for policies and actions that victimized older Americans, minorities and women, three congressional critics charged yesterday. "Of all the millions of people in America, surely President Bush can find a qualified nominee (for the Supreme Court) who has not built a career by hurting individual Americans," said Rep. Barbara Boxer (D., Calif.), flanked at a midday news conference by Reps.
NEWS
September 18, 1997
Africans and Americans The long-running love affair between Africa and black America appears on the brink of collapse. African Americans wax lyrical about their ancestral homeland, but the Congressional Black Caucus, Africa's natural lobby in the U.S. government, does not have time for foreign policy. The U.S. infatuation with Africa dates to Marcus Garvey's "Back to Africa" movement in the 1920s. . . . The brief intersection of politics and radical chic in the 1960s was arguably the closest convergence of New World and Old World Africans.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Beth DeFalco, Associated Press
TRENTON - U.S. Rep. Donald Payne, 77, a Democrat known for his work on human rights and on behalf of the poor and the first black congressional member from New Jersey, died Tuesday at St. Barnabas Hospital in Livingston, said his brother, William. The 12-term member of the House had announced in February that he was undergoing treatment for colon cancer and would continue to represent his district. He was flown back home to New Jersey on Friday from Georgetown University Hospital as his health took a turn for the worse.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | By Karen Schneider, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Magic Johnson's stunning announcement that he is infected with the AIDS virus may prod black members of Congress to do what AIDS activists have long sought: Take the lead in fighting an epidemic that is battering the minority community. "We are very hopeful that Magic Johnson's announcement will spur the Congressional Black Caucus to take a more visible leadership role in this epidemic," Ronald Johnson, executive director of the Minority Task Force on AIDS in New York, said Friday.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The redistricting that always follows a new census will be "a once-in-a- lifetime opportunity" this year, the Congressional Black Caucus was told yesterday. State legislatures are redrawing voting district lines all over the nation, and black Americans are fighting for their share of political empowerment. But there is "no guarantee that the Voting Rights Act will still be in place in some states (in the next redistricting), given the current Supreme Court and administration," said state Rep. James Burke of Miami.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A dramatic tax-raising deal last New Year's looked like it might be a breakthrough, signaling improved second-term relations between newly reelected President Obama and a divided Congress. At least that's what the White House hoped. But six months later, growing uncertainty over a sweeping immigration overhaul has dimmed expectations for a big summertime achievement and left Obama still in search of a marquee legislative accomplishment to mark his second four years. His advisers now concede that their best shot at changing the immigration system might come in the fall, after lawmakers return from their August recess.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Daniel J. Siegel
William H. Gray III, who died Monday, has been called a "transformative leader" and "the most significant African American political figure in Philadelphia in the last 35 years. " But it was a teacher, Sidney Wise, who spotted his potential and led him to prominence. In a 2009 interview, Gray attributed his decision to get involved in politics to Wise, a professor of government at a small liberal arts college, Franklin and Marshall, in Lancaster. Wise approached Gray a few weeks before his graduation in 1963.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Beth DeFalco, Associated Press
TRENTON - U.S. Rep. Donald Payne, 77, a Democrat known for his work on human rights and on behalf of the poor and the first black congressional member from New Jersey, died Tuesday at St. Barnabas Hospital in Livingston, said his brother, William. The 12-term member of the House had announced in February that he was undergoing treatment for colon cancer and would continue to represent his district. He was flown back home to New Jersey on Friday from Georgetown University Hospital as his health took a turn for the worse.
NEWS
September 25, 2011 | By Mark S. Smith, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In a fiery summons to an important voting bloc, President Obama told African Americans on Saturday to quit crying and complaining and "put on your marching shoes" to follow him into battle for jobs and opportunity. And though he didn't say it directly, for a second term, too. Obama's speech to the annual awards dinner of the Congressional Black Caucus was his answer to increasingly vocal griping from black leaders that he's been giving away too much in talks with Republicans - and not doing enough to fight black unemployment, which is nearly double the national average at 16.7 percent.
NEWS
November 9, 2008 | By Tom Adkins
There go my fellow conservatives, glumly shuffling along, depressed by the election aftermath. Not me. I'm virtually euphoric. Don't get me wrong. I'm not thrilled with America's flirtation with neosocialism. But there's a massive silver lining in the magical clouds that lofted Barack Obama to the presidency. For today, without a shred of intellectually legitimate opposition, I can loudly proclaim to America: The Era of White Guilt is over. This seemingly impossible event occurred because the vast majority of white Americans didn't give a fluff about skin color and enthusiastically pulled the voting lever for a black man. Not just any black man. A very liberal black man who spent his early career race-hustling banks, praying in a racist church for 20 years, and actively working with America-hating domestic terrorists.
NEWS
June 15, 2008 | By Rusty Pray, Dwight Ott and Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Samuel L. Evans, 105, the patriarch of Philadelphia's African American leaders, a toughened veteran of the civil-rights struggle, and a longtime power broker in city politics, died Friday night at the St. Agnes Continuing Care Center in South Philadelphia. "So many of us have stood on his shoulders and gotten an education in politics, government and other areas," Mayor Nutter said yesterday. "He was a voice for the voiceless and a role model. " Former Mayor W. Wilson Goode said: "Sam Evans was a legend in this city for close to seven decades.
NEWS
July 7, 2006 | By LLOYD WILLIAMS
"Just as the slavemaster of that day used Tom, the house Negro, to keep the field Negroes in check, the same old slavemaster today has Negroes who are nothing but modern Uncle Toms, 20th century Uncle Toms, to keep you and me in check, keep us under control, keep us passive and peaceful. "The slavemaster took Tom and dressed him well, and fed him well, and even gave him a little education - a little education; gave him a long coat and a top hat and made all the other slaves look up to him. Then he used Tom to control them.
NEWS
December 7, 2004 | By Tim Funk INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Rep. Mel Watt (D., N.C.), an opponent of the Iraq war and the Patriot Act, was chosen unanimously yesterday to lead the Congressional Black Caucus for the next two years. With the recent departures of two high-profile civil rights leaders - Kweisi Mfume of the NAACP and Fred Shuttlesworth of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference - Watt will be expected to fill a void in black leadership at a time when President Bush and congressional Republicans will push a conservative agenda that includes nominating federal judges and making Bush's tax cuts permanent.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2004 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tucked away amid the art galleries in SoHo, the restaurant Erica Kennedy suggests for lunch features glass rest-room doors that film over like lava lamps when you close them. Just the kind of place Vanessa de la Cruz, the cocaine-snorting villainess in Bling, would go to powder her nose. Back in Center City at the Four Seasons, you could imagine Lauren and Ed Thomas, the well-heeled moguls at the heart of Gotham Diaries, munching finger sandwiches and canapes at afternoon tea, just as Tonya Lewis Lee and Crystal McCrary Anthony did the other day. Kennedy, first-time author of the hot novel Bling, and Lee and Anthony, writers of the best-selling Gotham Diaries, hang out in the same kinds of places their characters do. It's no secret that art imitates life.
NEWS
June 22, 2004 | By Earl Ofari Hutchinson
Bill Clinton's recently published memoir, My Life, is not the milestone his public-relations flacks boast. But it will do much to further the myth that Clinton was a political genius - an image he doesn't deserve. With time, the Bush administration's foreign policy and domestic bumbles, and the lackluster performance by the crew of Democratic presidential candidates during the primaries, Clinton has been not only personally but also politically rehabilitated. As the Democrat who took back the White House in 1992 after 12 years of Republican rule, Clinton, so the story line goes, snatched a page from Ronald Reagan's ideological playbook and out-Republican the Republicans.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|