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NEWS
May 26, 2011 | Associated Press
SCRANTON - A U.S. representative from northeastern Pennsylvania has banned the public from recording his town-hall meetings. Members of the media may still record public meetings held by Republican Rep. Lou Barletta, but no one else is permitted to use video- or audio-recording devices. Barletta's spokesman, Shawn Kelly, said the policy was instituted so constituents could speak without fear of seeing their remarks show up on the Internet.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
An Indiana congressman investigating the Branch Davidian disaster suggested that people in Kentucky and Tennessee were a lot like David Koresh when it comes to having sex with minors. He later apologized. In an interview last month with the Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette of Indiana, freshman Republican Rep. Mark E. Souder said: "The only law that (the FBI) clearly established (Koresh) broke that I can see so far is he had sex with consenting minors. " "Do you send tanks and government troops into the large sections of Kentucky and Tennessee and other places where such things occur?"
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Don't sign on the dotted line unless you've read what you're signing. Just ask U.S. Rep. Joe Pitts (R., Pa.). He recently relearned that lesson the hard way. Replying to a Chester County constituent's e-mail regarding Middle East tensions, Pitts wrote on April 20 that "it is now incumbent on Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and Palestinian Authority Chairman Yasir Arafat" to hunker down at the negotiating table. Problem is, Arafat died in 2004. And Sharon, no longer Israel's leader, has lain in a coma-like state since a massive stroke in 2006.
NEWS
February 21, 2003 | By Kellie Patrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Bucks County congressman who chastised a high school senior after the teenager questioned the President's stance on Iraq spent part of yesterday fielding phone calls from disappointed constituents. "This is a little bit of a tempest in a teapot," said U.S. Rep. James Greenwood (R., Pa.). During a current events discussion at Fairless Hill's Pennsbury High School on Wednesday, senior Jeff Heinbach said he did not believe that President Bush had any humanitarian reasons for going to war, that the government "whitewashed" what it tells citizens, and that the impending war and current embargo were not the proper solution.
NEWS
July 14, 2012
Maine's former Democratic U.S. Rep. Peter Kyros, 86, has died. Mr. Kyros, a Democrat, represented Maine's First Congressional District from 1967 to 1975, a turbulent period that included the Vietnam War and the Watergate scandal. He initially was supportive of war policies but later spoke out against them. The Portland, Maine, native worked on warships in Bath at the start of World War II and enlisted in the Navy in 1943. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy and, after leaving the Navy in 1954, received a law degree from Harvard Law School.
NEWS
July 8, 2010
Former Rep. Emilio Daddario, 91, who served 12 years in Congress and two years as mayor of Middletown, Conn., died Wednesday in Washington from heart failure. Born in Newton Center, Mass., Mr. Daddario graduated from Wesleyan University and the University of Connecticut School of Law and started a law practice. He later enlisted in the Army and served in the Mediterranean theater. He was elected mayor of Middletown at age 28 and served from 1946 to 1948. He defeated former Rep. Edwin H. May Jr. in 1958 to win Connecticut's First District seat.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Top crew members of the USS Stark will face tough questioning - and possibly charges - as a result of the Iraqi attack on their ship, a congressman said yesterday after a Pentagon briefing. Rep. Bill Nichols (D., Ala.), whose Armed Services investigations subcommittee is probing the incident, said he "would not be at all surprised if there might not be charges against one or more members of the crew" of the Stark, 37 of whose crew members died in the May 17 missile attack. The subcommittee, in a closed meeting, heard from Rear Adm. David Rogers, who led a team of U.S. military and diplomatic officials that recently returned from Baghdad after consultations with the Iraqis.
NEWS
July 4, 2011
Richard H. Poff, 87, a former Republican congressman from Virginia who surprised official Washington in 1971 by withdrawing from consideration for a Supreme Court seat rather than submit to the scrutiny he feared his voting record against civil rights would arouse, died Tuesday in Tullahoma, Tenn. His death, at a nursing home, was confirmed by his family. Mr. Poff was a decorated World War II bomber pilot who rode Dwight D. Eisenhower's presidential coattails in 1952 to become one of the few southern Republicans in Congress since Reconstruction.
NEWS
May 19, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
OCEAN CITY, Md. - U.S. Rep. Andy Harris says he opposes a proposal to double the eastbound toll on the Bay Bridge. The Maryland Republican, whose district includes the Eastern Shore, said at a news conference Wednesday that state officials were unfairly shortchanging rural areas. A proposal from the Maryland Transportation Authority would raise the toll from $2.50 to $5 starting Oct. 1, with another hike to $8 following in 2013. State transportation officials defend the increase, the first since 1975, as necessary to maintain toll facilities.
NEWS
April 19, 2011
Harold L. Volkmer, 80, a 20-year Democratic congressman from northeast Missouri known for his advocacy of the rights of gun owners, died Saturday at a Hannibal nursing home after several bouts of pneumonia, the James O'Donnell Funeral Home in Hannibal said. Born in Jefferson City, Mr. Volkmer served a stint in the Army and then graduated from the University of Missouri School of Law. He was elected county prosecutor in 1960 and served in that role until his election to the Missouri House in 1966.
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NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Wayne Curtis Weldon Jr., 35, a son of former Congressman Curt Weldon of Delaware County, was found dead Monday, Aug. 29, in his Boyertown apartment, his father said Saturday. Mr. Weldon was found on his sofa. An autopsy was planned, his father said. Mr. Weldon had Type 1 diabetes that required regular insulin injections. But it was his long struggle with drug addiction that the family wanted to be "transparent and open" about, Weldon said. "We worked with Curt and went through the same trauma as other parents," said Weldon, a Republican who served in the U.S. House from 1987 to 2007, representing Pennsylvania's Seventh Congressional District.
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
A federal courtroom packed with supporters of political consultant Gregory Naylor erupted in cheers Tuesday as he was sentenced to probation for his role in the corruption case of former U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah. Naylor could have been sent to prison for more than three years after pleading guilty in August 2014 to concealing the misuse of $622,000 in campaign contributions and federal grant funds, and lying about it to the FBI. Prosecutors, while saying his cooperation with them and testimony against Fattah was pivotal, still wanted him to serve some prison time.
NEWS
June 29, 2016
By Lester Davis My stomach dropped Tuesday afternoon as I learned that my former boss and onetime mentor, U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, had been convicted on charges stemming from a federal racketeering case. I periodically followed Fattah's legal challenges, dating back to early 2014, when federal prosecutors subpoenaed documents from his congressional offices in connection with questions surrounding nonprofit organizations linked to the congressman. But I failed to fully appreciate the gravity of his situation until last Tuesday afternoon, when I stared blankly at a news alert that popped up on my cellphone announcing his conviction.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan and Jonathan Tamari, STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's conviction on federal corruption charges prompted calls for his resignation Tuesday, while longtime colleagues lamented his fate. "The jury spoke, and the criminal justice process went forward," Mayor Kenney said at a news conference in Washington. Kenney declined to state that Fattah (D., Pa.) should step down, but said the congressman's district needs a representative who is able to vote. House ethics rules bar members with criminal convictions from voting on legislation.
NEWS
June 23, 2016
The crimes Chaka Fattah was found guilty of Tuesday won't be mistaken for small-time. Money stolen to pay off illicit political debt was laundered through charities and companies. A network of aides and associates handled the details. Bribes were masked as a fictitious Porsche purchase or a sort of Fattah family child-care scholarship. And when the longtime Democratic congressman was convicted after a nine-year investigation, a monthlong trial, and three days of jury deliberations, it was as the captain of a criminal organization.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
The jury that will decide U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's fate began its deliberations Wednesday after a monthlong trial in which prosecutors accused him and four others of stealing taxpayer and charitable funds to cover his personal and political debts. U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III released the panel of four men and eight women to begin discussions just before 3:30, after instructing the group for nearly four hours on the legal principles that should guide its decision. Jurors deliberated for about an hour and a half before breaking for the day. They are expected to return Thursday.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
In their final pitch to the jury, prosecutors in U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's federal corruption trial on Tuesday labeled one of the region's longest-serving members of Congress a crook, a liar, and a thief. But as Justice Department lawyer Eric Gibson turned to point an accusatory finger at the congressman, the scene encapsulated impressions that both sides sought to leave with the panel. "The arrogance on display here is astounding," an animated Gibson declared. "In Fattah World, none of the rules that apply to anyone else have any application to the congressman, his family, or his codefendants.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
A woman who had a front-row seat at many of the events mentioned in U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's federal racketeering conspiracy indictment testified for the defense at his trial Tuesday. But if Maisha Leek, the congressman's former chief of staff and campaign fund-raising director, knew anything exceptionally beneficial to his defense or to the prosecutors seeking to convict him, she managed to keep it to herself. One of the most closely connected, yet unindicted, members of Fattah's inner circle to testify so far, Leek worked closely with Herbert Vederman, the wealthy fund-raiser accused of bribing the congressman over several years.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | Staff Reports
A member of the U.S. House is calling for an investigation of tainted water near former naval air stations, including those in Montgomery and Bucks Counties. U.S. Rep. Brendan Boyle (D., Pa.) on Monday requested a congressional hearing to force testimony from experts on perfluorinated compounds, and from Navy and Environmental Protection Agency officials about contaminated water near former bases. Perfluorinated compounds, which were commonly used in firefighting foams at the air stations at Willow Grove and Warminster, have been linked to cancer and reproductive problems, and were found in drinking water near the bases in 2014.
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