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Connectivity

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NEWS
May 22, 2003 | By Mark Schweiker and Richard A. Bendis
As the latest class of college students graduates into the working world, the media are filled with stories about the lack of jobs. That suggests a couple of questions - where do jobs come from, and how can we get more of them here? It's a very complicated answer, but it can be boiled down to this: Jobs come from vibrant regional economies, and to create more of them we have to invigorate innovation throughout the region. Other regions with "hot" economies - San Francisco, San Diego, Austin - have proved it. Innovation isn't just a buzzword; it is essential for regional survival.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
THERE'S SO much buzz these days about living in a "connected" world. The powers that make the products, as well as those who present the 2013 Philadelphia Auto Show, have taken that to heart. From nifty ride-on opportunities (think amusement park attractions) to a vintage muscle car competition, this year's cavalcade (700 vehicles!) is all about interaction and connection. To a degree, the show has always been about that. Car lovers get to kick tires, slam doors, fiddle with switches, inspect back seat and trunk capacity and smell the rich Corinthian leather.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2000 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Now, you can log on at the airport without plugging in and dialing up. Global Digital Media, based in the Boston area, yesterday officially unveiled its Becon network of wireless Internet hubs at the Philadelphia International Airport. The network provides connections to the Internet and e-mail from a laptop computer equipped with the appropriate PC card. The backbone of the Becon network is the 15 hubs presently located in the A, B and C terminals, the general concourse area, the concourse connectors and the baggage claim areas.
NEWS
July 30, 1995 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Chester County's on-ramp to the information superhighway has hit a few detours, a few potholes and even a new toll taker. But supporters of CHESCOnet say all of this is to be expected in the fast- changing world of technology and should not overshadow what has been accomplished in less than two years. "From the beginning, the question was how to get the information highway in Chester County," said County Commissioner Andrew Dinniman, an early and vocal cheerleader of the project.
NEWS
February 1, 2007 | By Jos M. Almiana
When we reflect on the enormous challenge Philadelphia faces in guiding the development of seven miles of its riverfront, from Port Richmond in the north to the grounds of the old Navy Yard in the south, we think about the connectivity - and lack of it - represented by this complex riverfront. Nowhere is connectivity more essential than in the riparian corridors of our city because the opportunities are few and precious. The very nature of this contact zone between land and water systems makes connectivity its reason to be - its ethos.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1989 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite having nearly doubled its 1987 revenues, Rabbit Software Corp. of Malvern said yesterday that it expected to report a loss of about $4.7 million for 1988. That compares with a loss of about $4 million for 1987. Rabbit attributed the loss to the company's "continued intensive investment" in its local area-network gateway-product lines, which enable computers to communicate with each other. In addition, the loss was increased by an unspecified amount in year-end writeoffs.
NEWS
January 9, 1994 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dying to hear about "Hitchhiker's Guide to Lotus Notes"? or "Preparing Buildings for 100 Megabits and Beyond"? Or simply want to know "What Is a Network"? Or how to get your company into a new county database that should help local businesses win government contracts? If so, there must be something for you at West Chester University this week at a conference that is expected to attract more than 1,600 techies and teachers, CEOs and government officials, computer nerds and just plain folks.
NEWS
February 26, 1995 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
West Chester University is expecting thousands of visitors to its Technology Symposium on March 20 and 21. "About 2,000 people attended last year," said Eugene Kray, a university dean. "Our seminars cover emerging technologies, connectivity and databases, government procurements, distance learning, and multimedia use in the corporate community. " U.S. Rep. Robert S. Walker (R., Pa.), chairman of the House Science Committee, will give the keynote address. As many as 80 vendors will have displays and booths to pitch their products.
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sometimes the little camera on top of Dan Updegrove's computer captured his image and transmitted it to the screen in front of him to join the images of two others - all miles away from each other. Sometimes, at the behest of his computer mouse, the screen showed a map of the University of Pennsylvania campus, where he works, or a beautifully sharp image of Tutankhamen, the boy king of ancient Egypt, called from the electronic depths of the Penn library. Updegrove was showing off the capabilities of Penn's data communications department in a booth at the Connectivity and Technology Symposium at West Chester University last week.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
ERM Program Management Co. has been awarded two major contracts for federal agencies. The company, an affiliate of Environmental Resources Management in Exton, will receive $6 million over three years for services relating to storage tank removal and replacement on bases in the Middle Atlantic and Southeastern regions. The U.S. Department of Energy in Idaho Falls, Idaho, has contracted for $5 million in services over a four-year period for managerial and technical support services from ERM for environmental restoration, waste management and nuclear safety services.
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NEWS
June 15, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Before the Affordable Care Act, it wasn't unusual for people in the LGBT community to be locked out of health insurance. Insurers could legally deny coverage based on a person's sexual orientation, gender identity, or pre-existing health condition. "It was everything from trans men and women being denied health coverage because their health history was confusing to a hospital or an insurance company, to young LGBT people not being able to afford coverage," said Brian Sims, a Pennsylvania state representative, lawyer, and LGBT civil rights activist.
SPORTS
June 7, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple football players Haason Reddick and Dion Dawkins will face trial on felony aggravated assault and conspiracy charges and related misdemeanor charges in connection with an off-campus fight at a North Philadelphia nightclub. Common Pleas Judge Michael Erdos reversed an earlier ruling by Judge Joyce Eubanks in April that had dismissed all charges against Reddick and dismissed most of the charges against Dawkins, holding him for trial only on a misdemeanor simple-assault charge.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
WE GET the European view of the saga behind "The French Connection" in "The Connection," but we don't get the same cinematic jolt. It's a high bar, of course. William Friedkin's "French Connection" was a stylistic landmark that in 1971 won several Oscars, including best picture and best actor for Gene Hackman as an obsessive narcotics detective. "The Connection" feels more like a procedural in search of its own personality. It's an overlong, subdued and generally bland affair, trading Friedkin's of-the-moment urgency for stale period details and technique that borrows from Martin Scorsese and Michael Mann.
SPORTS
May 10, 2015 | BY SHAMUS CLANCY, For the Daily News
ANOTHER SPRING WEEKEND on the indoor turf in South Philly brought another win for the Soul, still undefeated at 7-0, after toppling the Orlando Predators, 62-48, last night. Chase Utley's batting average might be lower than the average Philadelphian's blood-alcohol level on New Year's Day and LeSean McCoy might still be chirping about Chip Kelly up in Buffalo, but the Soul look poised to shine during this otherwise dreadful Philly sports calendar year. Under the Friday night lights of the Wells Fargo Center, the Soul's evening got off to a bumpy beginning, as a penalty-killing opening drive gave way to a 6-yard touchdown catch for Predators receiver Larry Brackins on the ensuing possession.
NEWS
May 6, 2015
I CAN'T SAY Pamela Geller is "happy" a couple of gunmen showed up shooting Sunday at her in-your-face Muhammad Art Exhibit and Cartoon Contest in Garland, Texas, but she must be pleased that it underscored her longtime warning: Islam is dangerous to democracy and to freedom of speech. She has anointed herself a free-speech (some say hate-speech) advocate and she, as the co-founder of the American Freedom Defense Initiative, recently beat SEPTA in court when the transit system tried to ban bus ads it (and others)
SPORTS
May 4, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hicham El-Mohpabi is the agent who represents several runners from Morocco and his group is gaining distinction settling in Roxborough for part of the year. That's right, the group of high-level runners, including the winner of last year's Blue Cross Broad Street Run, took a liking to Roxborough and it didn't take long to convince the the athletes it would be a quality place to live and train. As the Broad Street Run's 36th edition takes place Sunday, some of those runners who have been training in Philadelphia could be a factor once again.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The rowhouse at 753 Walnut St. is vacant and dilapidated, like many in Camden. Windows are boarded up, part of the roof has given way, and an adjacent lot is overgrown. What sets this house apart from others is a claim that it was home to Martin Luther King Jr. while he attended the now-closed Crozer Theological Seminary in Upland. There, he apparently studied for classes - and mulled issues that helped mold him as a civil rights leader. That connection is being investigated by the New Jersey Historic Preservation Office after it received an application to place the house on the New Jersey Register of Historic Places.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just four days after coming home to Northeast Philadelphia from Iraq in 2003, Tim Wynn got into a bar fight. The Marine was arrested for the first time in his life. That wasn't even the worst of it. "I can remember, my mother and my girlfriend at the time, now my wife, they didn't know what to do," he said. It took five years and six more arrests before he began court-ordered treatment for the PTSD that he didn't know he had. His homecoming might have been easier if he could have had access to a new website for Philadelphia-area veterans that went live Monday.
SPORTS
April 6, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
About to coach in her first women's Final Four, Dawn Staley took time out the other day to tell people on Twitter that she had finally taken down her Christmas tree. It had been a running joke between Staley and her 25,000 followers about her still having the tree up. After a suitable pause, after one Gamecocks fan noted her inspiration was enough to take their own tree down, came Staley's next tweet: "APRIL FOOLS on taking down the xmas tree . . . Gotcha!!!" Laughing emoticons took up the rest of Staley's 140 characters.
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