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Connectivity

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NEWS
May 22, 2003 | By Mark Schweiker and Richard A. Bendis
As the latest class of college students graduates into the working world, the media are filled with stories about the lack of jobs. That suggests a couple of questions - where do jobs come from, and how can we get more of them here? It's a very complicated answer, but it can be boiled down to this: Jobs come from vibrant regional economies, and to create more of them we have to invigorate innovation throughout the region. Other regions with "hot" economies - San Francisco, San Diego, Austin - have proved it. Innovation isn't just a buzzword; it is essential for regional survival.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
THERE'S SO much buzz these days about living in a "connected" world. The powers that make the products, as well as those who present the 2013 Philadelphia Auto Show, have taken that to heart. From nifty ride-on opportunities (think amusement park attractions) to a vintage muscle car competition, this year's cavalcade (700 vehicles!) is all about interaction and connection. To a degree, the show has always been about that. Car lovers get to kick tires, slam doors, fiddle with switches, inspect back seat and trunk capacity and smell the rich Corinthian leather.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2000 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Now, you can log on at the airport without plugging in and dialing up. Global Digital Media, based in the Boston area, yesterday officially unveiled its Becon network of wireless Internet hubs at the Philadelphia International Airport. The network provides connections to the Internet and e-mail from a laptop computer equipped with the appropriate PC card. The backbone of the Becon network is the 15 hubs presently located in the A, B and C terminals, the general concourse area, the concourse connectors and the baggage claim areas.
NEWS
July 30, 1995 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Chester County's on-ramp to the information superhighway has hit a few detours, a few potholes and even a new toll taker. But supporters of CHESCOnet say all of this is to be expected in the fast- changing world of technology and should not overshadow what has been accomplished in less than two years. "From the beginning, the question was how to get the information highway in Chester County," said County Commissioner Andrew Dinniman, an early and vocal cheerleader of the project.
NEWS
February 1, 2007 | By Jos M. Almiana
When we reflect on the enormous challenge Philadelphia faces in guiding the development of seven miles of its riverfront, from Port Richmond in the north to the grounds of the old Navy Yard in the south, we think about the connectivity - and lack of it - represented by this complex riverfront. Nowhere is connectivity more essential than in the riparian corridors of our city because the opportunities are few and precious. The very nature of this contact zone between land and water systems makes connectivity its reason to be - its ethos.
BUSINESS
February 8, 1989 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite having nearly doubled its 1987 revenues, Rabbit Software Corp. of Malvern said yesterday that it expected to report a loss of about $4.7 million for 1988. That compares with a loss of about $4 million for 1987. Rabbit attributed the loss to the company's "continued intensive investment" in its local area-network gateway-product lines, which enable computers to communicate with each other. In addition, the loss was increased by an unspecified amount in year-end writeoffs.
NEWS
January 9, 1994 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Dying to hear about "Hitchhiker's Guide to Lotus Notes"? or "Preparing Buildings for 100 Megabits and Beyond"? Or simply want to know "What Is a Network"? Or how to get your company into a new county database that should help local businesses win government contracts? If so, there must be something for you at West Chester University this week at a conference that is expected to attract more than 1,600 techies and teachers, CEOs and government officials, computer nerds and just plain folks.
NEWS
February 26, 1995 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
West Chester University is expecting thousands of visitors to its Technology Symposium on March 20 and 21. "About 2,000 people attended last year," said Eugene Kray, a university dean. "Our seminars cover emerging technologies, connectivity and databases, government procurements, distance learning, and multimedia use in the corporate community. " U.S. Rep. Robert S. Walker (R., Pa.), chairman of the House Science Committee, will give the keynote address. As many as 80 vendors will have displays and booths to pitch their products.
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sometimes the little camera on top of Dan Updegrove's computer captured his image and transmitted it to the screen in front of him to join the images of two others - all miles away from each other. Sometimes, at the behest of his computer mouse, the screen showed a map of the University of Pennsylvania campus, where he works, or a beautifully sharp image of Tutankhamen, the boy king of ancient Egypt, called from the electronic depths of the Penn library. Updegrove was showing off the capabilities of Penn's data communications department in a booth at the Connectivity and Technology Symposium at West Chester University last week.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
ERM Program Management Co. has been awarded two major contracts for federal agencies. The company, an affiliate of Environmental Resources Management in Exton, will receive $6 million over three years for services relating to storage tank removal and replacement on bases in the Middle Atlantic and Southeastern regions. The U.S. Department of Energy in Idaho Falls, Idaho, has contracted for $5 million in services over a four-year period for managerial and technical support services from ERM for environmental restoration, waste management and nuclear safety services.
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NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
Life in America today is arguably more anxiety-inducing than it's been for any generation since those that fought off the Depression and fascism. Even during the superheated political conflicts of the 1960s, people could get mad at each other, smash a window or a face, and still wind up with a decent-paying job and employer-provided health care. Tom Hayden and his activist generation didn't have to worry about getting trapped in a 1099 economy with no real hope of retirement savings outside of Social Security.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
In November, Zachary Bird was hanging out in the 'burbs with his dad, Bill, when he saw the light. The handsome, 10-foot, cast-iron Victorian lamp with a crown in the motif of acanthus leaves sparked a conversation - and that led to a quest, more modest than Sir Galahad's, but no less epic for the 46-year-old Zack. Traveling deep into the web, Zack learned intimately about Victorian gas lamps (down to the 1891 Welsbach patent for the gas mantle), discovered connections to Disneyland and a dentist/pilot/businessman/collector, followed leads to Cape May County, and traversed a field of dreams in South Jersey.
NEWS
August 10, 2016
ISSUE | MEDIA A McMullan hire John McMullan - very reluctantly - hired me as a reporter for the Miami Herald in September 1969, shortly before he came to Philadelphia as executive editor of The Inquirer ("John E. McMullan set the Inquirer's course," Sunday). At the time, I had only about two years' experience in daily newspaper journalism. But I decided to move from Philly to Miami Beach and seek a newspaper job. I sent my clips and resumé to the Herald, and in spite of my inexperience, was granted an interview.
SPORTS
August 7, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, STAFF WRITER
Will we see bachelorette JoJo Fletcher and her beau in Happy Valley for a Penn State football game on the opening day of the 2016 season? It just may very well happen. Jordan Rodgers, who won the hand of Fletcher Monday night in the season finale of the reality show The Bachelorette, played quarterback at Vanderbilt in 2011 and 2012 under then-head coach James Franklin. Now Penn State's head coach, Franklin said Thursday at football media day that he would love to have Rodgers and his fiancée come to a game, and he set out to do that later in the day on Twitter.
NEWS
August 7, 2016
The Silk Roads A New History of the World By Peter Frankopan. Knopf. 672 pp. $30 Reviewed by Paul M. Cobb I n the year 1238, at the abbey of St. Albans, a serene 20 miles or so northwest of London, a medieval scribe named Matthew Paris recorded some tragic news about fish. In that year, the fishermen and merchants from the Baltic who ordinarily crossed the North Sea to take part in the herring fishing off the coast of England did not dare leave their homes.
SPORTS
July 30, 2016 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Throughout his week in Las Vegas earlier this month, Jay Wright hustled from coaches meetings to team meals to practices, keeping company with the power people in USA Basketball, and not once did he experience a moment alone with the most powerful of them all. Wright spent those seven days in the desert as an assistant coach with the USA select team, the group of 23 young NBA players charged with preparing the U.S. national men's team for the...
NEWS
July 18, 2016
Kingsessing - with its paneled homes with metal awnings, trolley cables stretching over asphalt streets, and weeds peeking out from concrete cracks - is hardly the picture of nature. But the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has a plan to make Kingsessing a model for green space. Working with groups such as Philadelphia University's landscape architecture program and the grassroots organization Empowered CDC, Fish and Wildlife has identified eight spaces to turn into community green space.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
A long-classified document suggesting involvement by Saudi Arabian government employees in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks was released by the House Intelligence Committee on Friday after a campaign by families and victims for its disclosure. The 28 pages - available at philly.com/911saudi - had been classified for 14 years until Friday afternoon. "While in the United States, some of the September 11 hijackers were in contact with, and received support or assistance from, individuals who may be connected to the Saudi government," the report says.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
How big a bet is Comcast placing on smart-home gadgets and monitoring services, on the whole Internet of Things/connected-home revolution? Enough so that Comcast's Xfinity Home division is introducing its own line of smart-home products. And the company recently agreed to purchase the iControl Converge software platform and engineering talent pool. iControl powers the home-security and automation platform for Xfinity Home, as well as IoT services for other cable companies (Cox, Rogers, Time Warner, and Bright House)
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Tom Wilk, Former Inquirer Copy Editor
  When the Delaware River Bridge opened on July 1, 1926, an estimated 100,000 people crossed the span, taking the opportunity to travel between Philadelphia and Camden without water transportation. They came on foot, not by car, that first day. Ninety years later, the bridge has undergone many changes, starting with its name. The span was renamed the Benjamin Franklin Bridge in 1956 to differentiate it from the Walt Whitman Bridge. Tolls are now one-way and have risen from 25 cents to $5 for cars, with E-ZPass now an option.
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