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Connie Mack

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SPORTS
August 29, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
I realize the admission could cost me membership in the Philadelphia Chapter of the Aging Baby Boomers Society, but I never thought the Three Stooges were funny. For me, the appeal of the slapstick was overshadowed by the unpleasantness of the slapped faces, not to mention all the eye-gouging, ear-twisting, and hair-pulling that convulsed so many others who watched the Stooges nightly on Sally Starr's Popeye Theater . So it was as disappointing as it was surprising when a Facebook friend recently posted a black-and-white photo I'd never seen, a publicity shot in which those same Stooges were playing stickball with, of all people, Connie Mack.
SPORTS
December 7, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
There were no tears or celebrations when his life's obsession was done. There was only great relief. "I was ready to be done," Norman Macht said. "I lived with it for so long. " Early this year, Macht sent off the galley proofs for the third and last volume of the Connie Mack biography he began in 1985. He was 56 then. For three decades, he immersed himself in the man who managed and owned the Philadelphia Athletics for a half-century. He traveled everywhere Mack had been.
SPORTS
August 22, 2001 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Connie Mack not only dressed like a Victorian gentleman, he behaved like one, too. Dignified and distinguished, with a reputation as stiffly erect as the high collars he favored, Mack was a churchgoing exemplar of traditional values in the morality-stretching 1920s. Which is why, 75 years ago today, he seemed so ill-suited in the role of public lawbreaker. On Aug. 22, 1926, the manager/co-owner of the Philadelphia Athletics sent his team onto the Shibe Park field in blatant violation of Pennsylvania's Blue Laws, the Colonial-era regulations that prohibited almost everything but church socials on Sundays.
NEWS
May 2, 1999 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was an era when you could sit in the bleachers for 50 cents and watch baseball heroes with colorful names step up to the plate. There were "Shoeless Joe" Jackson, "Home Run" Baker and "Chief" Bender, for instance. As players with the Philadelphia Athletics, their talent led them to capture four pennants and three World Series titles in the span of five years. But it took more than talent, as a new exhibit at the Chester County Historical Society reveals through period photographs, paintings, artifacts and original film footage.
NEWS
July 9, 2012 | By john rooney
I HAD LEARNED at an early age that baseball was a business. So, when the nun asked our first-grade class how many boys wanted to see the Philadelphia A's win the World Series game being played that day in Shibe Park against Chicago, every boy's hand shot up in the air — except mine. Why did I want to see Chicago win? Because the Series would go an extra game and we would make more money. With the Phillies mired in last place, fans are criticizing the performance of the players and questioning decisions made by the organization.
SPORTS
November 8, 2012 | Associated Press
ON A NIGHT when sports and politics went one-on-one, name recognition scored few points with voters. Linda McMahon, who once ran World Wrestling Entertainment with her husband, lost her U.S. Senate race in Connecticut - again. Connie Mack IV, who carries one of the most venerated names in baseball, was defeated in a bid for a Senate seat in Florida. George Allen, with familial links to the Washington Redskins past and present, also was blocked from the Senate. Ben Chandler, the grandson of former baseball commissioner Happy Chandler, was out of his U.S. House seat in Kentucky.
NEWS
January 28, 2013
By John J. Rooney When I wake up in the middle of the night and have trouble getting back to sleep, I follow the advice of sleep specialists who recommend a vicarious walk through a familiar, pleasant scene. In my imagination, I find myself revisiting the section of North Philadelphia where I grew up - a rowhouse, working-class, Irish American neighborhood known as Swampoodle. I close the front door behind me, cross the porch, and descend the steps to 20th Street. Two versions of the scene come to mind.
NEWS
November 9, 1988 | By Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Hubert H. Humphrey lost an election in Minnesota yesterday. Connie Mack was in a fight. And Gary Hart was trying to become President Reagan's man in Washington. The names may sound familiar, but these aren't the guys you may be thinking about. Humphrey, better known as "Skip," is the Minnesota state attorney general, son and namesake of the late senator and vice president. Humphrey tried to follow his father (and his mother, who held an interim appointment) into the U.S. Senate, but lost to Republican Sen. David Durenberger.
SPORTS
July 9, 1996 | by Doug Darroch, Daily News Sports Writer Sources: ``Babe,'' by Robert W. Creamer; ``Philadelphia's Old Ballparks,'' by Rich Westcott
Although he was a Baltimore native and played for Boston and New York, Philadelphia had more than a bit part in the Babe Ruth story: MACK HAD DIBS When Jack Dunn had to sell off his stars to save his minor league franchise in 1914, he first offered Babe Ruth to Philadelphia A's owner Connie Mack. But Mack already was making plans to get rid of his own stars after the season. Ruth wound up with the Red Sox. WORLD SERIES DEBUT Ruth made his first World Series appearance in 1915's Game 1 at Baker Bowl (Broad and Huntingdon)
NEWS
May 16, 2004 | By Phil Joyce FOR THE INQUIRER
Connie Mack called him "mister," which sounds impressive enough - except that Connie Mack called just about everybody "mister. " Mack even called Ty Cobb - whom he considered the "dirtiest player in baseball" - "Mr. Cobb. " What's impressive is that Bill Campbell was covering sports in the mid-1940s when the legendary Cornelius McGillicuddy ("Mr. Mack" to you) was managing the Philadelphia Athletics. Campbell was a 22-year-old sports reporter for radio station WCAU who worked mostly nights.
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SPORTS
August 29, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
I realize the admission could cost me membership in the Philadelphia Chapter of the Aging Baby Boomers Society, but I never thought the Three Stooges were funny. For me, the appeal of the slapstick was overshadowed by the unpleasantness of the slapped faces, not to mention all the eye-gouging, ear-twisting, and hair-pulling that convulsed so many others who watched the Stooges nightly on Sally Starr's Popeye Theater . So it was as disappointing as it was surprising when a Facebook friend recently posted a black-and-white photo I'd never seen, a publicity shot in which those same Stooges were playing stickball with, of all people, Connie Mack.
SPORTS
June 27, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
Even before the Cavaliers' chartered jet departed San Francisco Monday, the morning after that franchise's first NBA title, a massive parade was planned for downtown Cleveland, mock-ups of their championship rings were all over the internet, and their mandatory White House visit was being hastily arranged. Those three rewards - the procession, the precious stone, and the president's personal praise - have become the official booty of champions, the trifecta of triumph, the sine qua non of sports.
NEWS
January 7, 2016
By John Rossi There were few Philadelphia worthies on the recently released Baseball Hall of Fame ballot. Of course, Dick "Don't Call Me Richie" Allen is on the Old Timers ballot again but has at best a slim chance of election, something that many fans, not just Philadelphians, believe is long overdue. But there is another Philadelphia baseball player who has been overlooked and now is largely forgotten by the city's rabid baseball fans: Robert Lee "Indian Bob" Johnson. Part Cherokee Indian, Johnson was born in 1906 in Oklahoma - then called the Indian Territory- and gloried in his politically incorrect nickname.
SPORTS
December 7, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
There were no tears or celebrations when his life's obsession was done. There was only great relief. "I was ready to be done," Norman Macht said. "I lived with it for so long. " Early this year, Macht sent off the galley proofs for the third and last volume of the Connie Mack biography he began in 1985. He was 56 then. For three decades, he immersed himself in the man who managed and owned the Philadelphia Athletics for a half-century. He traveled everywhere Mack had been.
SPORTS
June 22, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Before the pair of renaissances that yielded the Phillies their only two World Series titles and salvaged some pride for a franchise paralyzed by humiliation, Bucks County-born author James Michener was asked how he endured the ups and downs of being a baseball fan. "Ups?" Michener replied. "What ups? I'm from Philadelphia. " The Philadelphia Michener knew as a boy was a robust industrial hub, a city frequently referred to as "The Nation's Workshop. " But by the time the prolific writer died in 1997, most of the factories that had cranked out everything from locomotives to hats were shuttered.
SPORTS
December 15, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
As the concrete foundation of the new Comcast Innovation and Technology Center was being poured last week, the Phillies continued dismantling their own less-enduring underpinnings. Jimmy Rollins is going to the Dodgers. Cole Hamels is on the market. And if you phone now, Ryan Howard can be yours by Christmas. The baseball around here figures to be hellish at least for as long it takes Comcast's second Center City tower, a 1,121-foot edifice on Arch Street, to reach the heavens. For whatever reason, this phenomenon of simultaneous ascension and descent is more common here than you might imagine.
SPORTS
June 23, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Dan Snyder has been forced to circle the wagons in his greedy defense of the controversial Washington Redskins trademark. And few outside of Cleveland would be surprised, or dismayed, if the Indians' overtly racist logo - the toothy Chief Wahoo - soon vanished. The supporters of these anachronistic sporting symbols see them as worthy, innocent, and long-standing traditions. But to believe that, you've got to overlook the disturbing history from which they arose. There was a time in American sports, predominantly in early 20th-century baseball, when deformed or degraded mascots were the norm.
NEWS
March 25, 2014
PHILLIES fans once hurled batteries at J.D. Drew because he refused to sign with their team. Philadelphia is the only city in America that had a judge, court and even jail on the premises during a professional football game. And, yes, Philadelphia fans did throw snowballs at Santa Claus. But that is another story. What is the source of Philadelphia's infamous reputation for negativism, for always expecting the worst of its sports teams? After all, Philadelphia did have its moments of sports glory.
SPORTS
December 2, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Mike Turner nearly forgot about the tiny bedroom closet in his late father-in-law's house. Chick Galloway, a shortstop for nine seasons with Connie Mack's Philadelphia A's, had built the house in Clinton, S.C., in 1926, the year Turner was born. Since the former ballplayer's death in 1969, two of Turner's daughters have occupied the Spanish-style dwelling adjacent to Presbyterian College's campus. Now his youngest daughter, in the midst of a divorce, is making plans to sell the longtime family residence.
SPORTS
October 28, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
I bequeath myself to the dirt to grow from the grass I love, If you want me again look for me under your boot-soles. - Walt Whitman, "Song of Myself," Leaves of Grass Not long ago, amid the dirt and grass of Harleigh Cemetery in Camden, where Walt Whitman himself is interred, I went looking again for my great-grandfather. There, under my boot-soles, I found him in Plot 115. But the great poet was mistaken. The grave site yielded few answers. John Radcliff is a ghost.
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