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BUSINESS
July 13, 1999 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co. got intense, though short-lived, attention from Wall Street on Friday. The chemical giant's stock jumped as much as $5 a share in early trading and closed up $3 for the day, as arbitrageurs sought to exploit the company's terms for the final stage of its Conoco Inc. spin-off. It's just the kind of jump that can overtake big stocks, even Dow-Jones industrials such as DuPont, on slow summer days when news breaks while half the investment world is up in the hills or down on the beach.
BUSINESS
March 27, 1986 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Du Pont Co. granted its largest shareholder, Seagram Co. Ltd., a greater voice in the affairs of the company and assured its own independence under a new "standstill" agreement announced yesterday by officials of both firms. The arrangement extends and modifies the terms of a 10-year agreement worked out in 1981. Though the original pact was to run until 1991, it established a deadline of next year for seeking an extension. Otherwise, Seagram would have lost its current three seats on the Du Pont board.
NEWS
January 8, 1986 | By James McCartney, Inquirer Washington Bureau (Inquirer Washington Bureau reporter Ellen Warren contributed to this article.)
Citing "criminal outrages by an outlaw regime," President Reagan last night imposed a total U.S. economic embargo on Libya and called on the more than 1,000 Americans remaining in that country to leave immediately. Reagan made the announcement in a nationally televised news conference, his first since September, while declaring he had "irrefutable evidence" of Libyan involvement in the Dec. 27 terrorist attacks at airports in Rome and Vienna that killed 19, including five Americans.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1986 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hey there, blue-collar America: This boom's for you. If you work in a factory, shop at a K mart, drive a Chevrolet and dine at the Colonel's, this is your season in the sun. The stunning collapse of oil prices during the last few months means a boost for the whole energy-consuming economy, but not in equal amounts: The biggest winners, say a number of economists, will be those in the middle. As the effects of cheaper oil prices ripple through the U.S. economy, people who take home modest paychecks, work in low-tech factories and shop at mass-market outlets will enjoy the largest benefits, the analysts say. Yuppies and their affluent suburban cousins will benefit proportionately less.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
IN THE REGION Urban: Controversial shirt never stocked Urban Outfitters Inc. said it never stocked or sold a controversial T-shirt with a pocket patch that critics said resembled a symbol worn by Jews in Nazi Europe, while the shirt's Danish manufacturer, Wood Wood, said a photo featuring the embroidery on Urban's website "must be an early sample" of a prototype that was never, ultimately, made. The Philadelphia-based retailer would not explain how a photo of the yellow cotton Kellog tee with a six-pointed blue star on a chest pocket ended up on its website for $100.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1991 | By Terry Bivens and Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writers
Bethlehem Steel Corp. yesterday reported large losses for the fourth quarter and 1990, reflecting $550 million in costs for restructuring and modernization, including a recently announced plan to form a joint venture with British Steel PLC. The British Steel venture, announced on Jan. 24, would begin in two or three years. As envisioned, it would eliminate 2,000 Bethlehem Steel jobs and effectively end more than a century of steelmaking in the company's home city of Bethlehem, Northampton County.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1986 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer (Staff writer Gilbert M. Gaul contributed to this article.)
Weaker demand and lower prices for many of the products made by the Du Pont Co. resulted in a 22 percent decline in 1985 profits for the Wilmington company. The chemical and oil company yesterday reported net income of $1.12 billion or $4.61 a share, versus $1.43 billion or $5.93 a share in 1984. Sales were $29.5 billion, a 4 percent drop from revenue of $30.6 billion in 1984. Analysts were predicting a much steeper decline in annual profits. Thom Brown of Butcher & Singer in Philadelphia said he had been estimating earnings of about $4.30 a share and was surprised that income was better.
NEWS
August 14, 2003 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To Daniel and Susan Cohen, Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi will remain a terrorist regardless of how much he capitulates before the United Nations, or how much money he pays to the families of the victims of Pan Am Flight 103. They see any deal with the dictator as a politically motivated move to open up Libya's oil markets. "This was Gadhafi's crime and he shouldn't get away with it, and that's what's happening," said Susan Cohen of Cape May Court House, whose daughter died in the bombing.
NEWS
October 9, 1988 | By Bob Garfield, Special to The Inquirer
Wendelin Bickler is a dead farmer. Mark Carlson is chairman of the Greater Rugby Area Convention and Visitors Bureau. Father X is a phony Catholic priest. The U.S. Geodetic Survey is a government agency concerned with maps. What they all have in common is an obscure latitudinal-longitudinal coordinate. It's right here in Pierce County, and there is nothing like it anywhere else in the world. We're talking about the Geographical Center of North America. "If you take a map of the continent . . . and you put a pin through Rugby, it will balance perfectly," says Carlson, a Rugby city father and publisher of the Pierce County Tribune.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1991 | The Inquirer Staff
Du Pont Co., the Wilmington chemical and energy producer, said yesterday that despite improvement from its Conoco oil operations, its earnings slid 21 percent during the second quarter. "Although our petroleum earnings were up 38 percent from last year and there were signs of recovery for some of our U.S. fibers businesses, the impact of continuing weakness in key markets depressed second-quarter earnings," said chairman Edgar S. Woolard. Earnings were down for chemicals, fibers, polymers, diversified businesses and coal, according to company figures.
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