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Conoco

BUSINESS
July 1, 2007 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
First of two parts Over its 205 years, DuPont Co. has manufactured some of America's best-known products - cellophane, nylon and Teflon. The breadth of its technological research, and the scientific talent that flocked to work at DuPont, has spawned more than 30 other firms - and many are in this region. "It is their variety that has spawned this variety," said Jonathan Russ, professor and historian of American business at the University of Delaware. "There have been firms historically where people have left to do their own projects - IBM, Xerox, Kodak.
NEWS
November 12, 2003 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A terrorist slams a front-end loader into an oil tank at the ConocoPhillips refinery in Trainer, Delaware County. Crude pours over a dike and floods the Marcus Hook Creek. Soon, a metastasizing, 10,000-barrel spill shuts down the Delaware River. Now what? Luckily, the scenario was fiction, but the reaction was the real deal. Led by the local U.S. Coast Guard unit, more than 300 emergency responders began a two-day exercise yesterday to simulate an oil spill caused by a terrorist attack.
NEWS
August 14, 2003 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To Daniel and Susan Cohen, Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi will remain a terrorist regardless of how much he capitulates before the United Nations, or how much money he pays to the families of the victims of Pan Am Flight 103. They see any deal with the dictator as a politically motivated move to open up Libya's oil markets. "This was Gadhafi's crime and he shouldn't get away with it, and that's what's happening," said Susan Cohen of Cape May Court House, whose daughter died in the bombing.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2002 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 14 years, DuPont researcher Peter M. Mrozinski has worked on a gene-based system for detecting food contamination. The $39,000 BAX system introduced in November 2000 gained a key customer in April when a federal food-safety agency decided to use it in three field labs. But will DuPont Co. stick with the BAX system long enough for it to fulfill the potential seen by Mrozinski? There was a time when such a question would have seemed out of place at DuPont, which marks its 200th anniversary on July 19. Founded as a gunpowder-maker in 1802, DuPont thrived through much of the 20th century on its inventions - nylon, Teflon, Lycra and countless other products that go into clothing, buildings and automobiles worldwide.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1999 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co. got intense, though short-lived, attention from Wall Street on Friday. The chemical giant's stock jumped as much as $5 a share in early trading and closed up $3 for the day, as arbitrageurs sought to exploit the company's terms for the final stage of its Conoco Inc. spin-off. It's just the kind of jump that can overtake big stocks, even Dow-Jones industrials such as DuPont, on slow summer days when news breaks while half the investment world is up in the hills or down on the beach.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co. shares fell sharply yesterday after the Wilmington-based company said it anticipates a 10 to 15 percent decline in second-quarter earnings. The company's stock price fell $7 a share to close at $70.13 as 11.1 million shares were traded, more than four times the average daily volume. The drop by DuPont, one of the 30 stocks in the Dow Jones Industrial Average, accounted for 28.6 points of the blue-chip average's decline of 85.19 points to 9,089.78 yesterday. Last year, DuPont's second-quarter earnings were 99 cents a share, and analysts expected the company to earn $1.01 a share in the second quarter of this year.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1998 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co. announced yesterday that it will spin off its oil subsidiary, Conoco Inc. It will start by selling up to 20 percent of the company in what will be one of the largest initial public offerings in history. Company officials said the move was part of "an aggressive growth plan" in which the Wilmington company will put even more emphasis on agricultural biotechnology and pharmaceutical products. Analysts said the sale could bring DuPont $3 billion to $5 billion, valuing Conoco at between $15 billion and $30 billion.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1993 | By Donna Shaw, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was Greenpeace, with its propane-fueled, ozone-friendly refrigerator parked across the street. There were critics of toxic emissions and of generous executive pay. Interspersed with these were calls for political nonpartisanship, compensation for Florida farmers and better contracts for union employees. These and other diverse interests came together yesterday at the annual shareholders meeting of the DuPont Co., in a year when the huge company is redefining itself as lean and efficient in response to harsh economic conditions.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1991 | The Inquirer Staff
Du Pont Co., the Wilmington chemical and energy producer, said yesterday that despite improvement from its Conoco oil operations, its earnings slid 21 percent during the second quarter. "Although our petroleum earnings were up 38 percent from last year and there were signs of recovery for some of our U.S. fibers businesses, the impact of continuing weakness in key markets depressed second-quarter earnings," said chairman Edgar S. Woolard. Earnings were down for chemicals, fibers, polymers, diversified businesses and coal, according to company figures.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1991 | By Marian Uhlman and Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writers
Du Pont Co., the Wilmington chemical and energy producer, said yesterday that improved profits from its Conoco oil operations helped to cushion falling profits from its other businesses. Total profits were down 4 percent in the quarter, when the recession cut demand for a number of Du Pont's products, including carpet fibers, coal, polymers and electronic and imaging systems. However, after-tax profits from Conoco were up 63 percent from the first quarter of 1990, thanks to strong profit margins on the refining of crude oil and improved sales of oil and natural gas. Du Pont said its chemical operations were hurt by the costs of the partial end to Freon production in the United States and by the costs of developing alternatives to Freon and other chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)
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